Free Jean Toomer Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Jean Toomer

    • 1041 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Jean Toomer's family was not typical of migrating African Americans settling in the North, or fleeing the South. Each of his maternal grandparents were born of a caucasian father. But a "speck of Black makes you Black." Thus, Toomer's grandfather, Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback, was a free born black, a Union officer in the Civil War and was elected to the office of Lieutenant Governor and later Acting Governor of Louisiana during Reconstruction. The Pinchback's retired north and settled in the

    • 1041 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Jean Toomer- An African American Writer

    • 1177 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited

    Jean Toomer was an African American writer. He was known as the leading American writer of the 1920s after he established his book "Cane" which inspired authors of the Harlem Renaissance. Jean Toomer was born on December 26, 1894 as Nathan Pinchback Toomer. His mother was the governor of Louisiana during Reconstruction and the first U.S. governor of African American descent (Jones 1). In 1985, Toomer's father abandoned him and his mother. He forced them to live with his mother cruel father in Washington

    • 1177 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Claude McKay was born on September 15th 1890, in the West Indian island of Jamaica. He was the youngest of eleven children. At the age of ten, he wrote a rhyme of acrostic for an elementary-school gala. He then changed his style and mixed West Indian folk songs with church hymns. At the age of seventeen he met a gentlemen named Walter Jekyll, who encouraged him to write in his native dialect. Jekyll introduced him to a new world of literature. McKay soon left Jamaica and would never return to his

    • 692 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Alice Walker

    • 661 Words
    • 2 Pages

    didn’t see yet. This plan was for them to identify their artistic ability, whether if it was through singing, writing or making quilts. Throughout the essay, “In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens,”Alice Walker’s mentions her foremothers. Women like Jean Toomer, Phillis Wheatley and Zora Neale Hurtson, who were all either poets or writers. Mike Fike has also reco...

    • 661 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Jean Toomer Essay Topics

    • 1135 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Jean Toomer was an author of many poems. Sometimes his poetry may be difficult to understand, but if a reader can find key words they can interpret some meaning out of it. Toomer was born close to a time period where they may have said words that had different meanings than they do now. He grew up in a time period where society thought that some people should have less respect toward certain people. Toomer organized everything he knew about morality and edited it into his poetry. Jean Toomer’s

    • 1135 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Karintha's Plight

    • 700 Words
    • 2 Pages

    In Cane by Jean Toomer, women are, as critic Meagan Abbott writes, “damaged by functioning primarily as vessels of others’ meaning.” Using a combination of prose and poetry, Toomer metaphorically alludes to the affects of sexuality on Karintha, the protagonist of the first short story in Cane, “Karintha,” over time. Because of her sultry beauty, Karintha is prematurely thrust into the sexual arena through no doing of her own, becoming burdened rather than invigorated by her beauty. Her early exposure

    • 700 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Like many average White American, Toomer was not recognized by the African American people and had no intentions to taking him or his book seriously because of his preference of being white. Toomer, like other poets and playwrights, has been very successful in describing significant events through his use of vocabulary and vision. Toomer uses different literary devices to give a visual and emotional feeling of the reaper and his hunger

    • 1286 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jean Toomer was raised by a single mother and grandfather, for he “never knew his father” (958). He never completed a college degree despite attending numerous universities and colleges. Before writing his critically acclaimed work, Cane, Toomer used his talent to write for articles and magazines and was also a teacher for a short –while. While attending various colleges and universities, writing articles and magazines for work, and spreading the power of education, Toomer traveled to many “African

    • 919 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Blood-Burning Moon b Jean Toomer

    • 1245 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited

    Come out that fact’ry door” (Toomer 652). This moon blazing scarlet in the night sky certainly sets the tone for Jean Toomer’s story, “Blood-Burning Moon.” Not only does it foreshadow the violence that darkens his tale, but it also symbolizes the irresistible forces that tug at the lives of our three main characters, pushing and pulling on the chords of racial inequality that bind the nation. The moral vacuum left by the First World War compelled such writers as Toomer to focus on the individual’s

    • 1245 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Jean Toomer was bi-racial, sometimes being perceived as white and sometimes black. His race was a catalyst for his writings. Toomer wrote prose and poetry reflecting his ideas about race and gender, not wanting either to be an issue in the future. His writings depict people of all races facing struggles, some gender struggles and some racial struggles. In “Becky” and in “Blood Burning Moon,” Toomer centers around two females. During the time period of his writings and what is still somewhat evident

    • 927 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Use of Imagery in Jean Toomer's Cane

    • 2441 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 14 Works Cited

    Use of Imagery in Jean Toomer's Cane Dusk. It is that darker side of twilight when the sun has just set, but the moon has yet to take full charge. It is a time of mergings, of vagueness and ambiguity, when an end and a beginning change places. The sun steps aside and lets the moon and stars take over for a while. As the most pervasive image in the first section of Jean Toomer's Cane, it is the time of day when "[t]he sky, lazily disdaining to pursue/The setting sun, too indolent to hold/

    • 2441 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 14 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jean Toomer’s Cane elucidates the complicated racial plight of early twentieth century America. His assumably conscientious attempt to consider a social panacea is belied only by the appearance that the entire work fails to provide any direct solution to the modern experience. There exists, however, a referential significance that realigns his project with messages of Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio, an earlier work from the modernist canon. A close reading of Cane’s structure and thematic

    • 1095 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    An Analysis of Jean Toomer's Cane In the prose fiction Cane: Jean Toomer uses the background of the Black American in the South to assist in establishing the role of the modernist black writer.  While stylistic characteristics such as ambiguity of words and the irony of the contradictory sentences clearly mask this novel as a modernist work.   Toomer draws upon his experiences and his perspective of the life of Blacks in Georgia to create a setting capable of demonstrating the difficulties

    • 1695 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    why don't that doctor come on here?" Rannie keeps on hoping, and not allowing Sarah, the witch doctor to help her. Rannie believes that Sarah help will be evil, and that the white doctor will soon come. 'We going to have us a doctor,' Rannie Toomer said fiercly, walking over to shoo a fat winter fly from her child's forehead. 'I don't belive in none of that swamp magic.' Rannie is unaware of who she is and how others view her. She does not realize that the color of her skin is oppressing

    • 1203 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    A Look at the Character Karintha in Jean Toomer's Cane Jean Toomer's Cane begins with a vignette entitled "Karintha" about a young woman who grows up too quickly. The first paragraph tell us that "men had always wanted her, this Karintha, even as child...." From the description that is presented, it appears that she was always beautiful and desirous to men, even when she was a mere child. Men of all ages wanted her from the time she was young - the young men couldn't wait until she was old

    • 1013 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Toomer's Seventh Street, Depicts Life and Issues in the Prohibition Period Toomer captures very deep thoughts in his writing in fairly simple language. The way he works his ideas into the text is amazing. In "Seventh Street," an excerpt from his larger work, Cane, Toomer blends ethnic ideas together while speaking about issues that involve the whole public spectrum. He begins with a four-line verse that draws the reader in and helps him to visualize the setting. Money burns the pocket

    • 1006 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Comparing the Blues and Jean Toomer's Cane

    • 2007 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited

    Comparing the Blues and Jean Toomer's Cane "The difference between the possibility of Black life and the Reality of Black Life is the Blues" (McKeever 196) Debate centers around the structure of Jean Toomer's introspective work Cane. Whether viewed as a novel or a collection of short stories and poems, the impressions are poignant and compelling. They are full of passion and depict a writer casting a critical eye towards himself and his surroundings. The work is often read as a "portrait

    • 2007 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Second of all, in particular jeans and pants play a role in fashion. It’s based on the seasons. For example, shorts fit best in the summer and spring. Leggings would fit best in the fall and winter. There are many types of leggings. Multicolored leggings are like printed, with flowers and any other kind of design. One strange fact about jeans is that it even has a birthday it’s on May 20th! Skinny pants and sweatpants are in fashion right now, as you can see I wear skinny jeans almost everyday! Pajamas

    • 773 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Blue Jeans and Denim

    • 785 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Jeans have become one of the most popular articles of casual dress around the world. Nothing speaks louder than consumers’ demand; estimated over 800 million pairs of blue jeans are produced worldwide, which represents a multi-billion dollar business. According to market-research firm NPD Group, Americans bought $13.8 billion of jeans in the year ended April 30, 2011. Another resource claims that North America alone accounts for 39% of global purchases of jeans, followed by Western Europe at 20%

    • 785 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    I wake up in the backyard laying in the grass of my house with the biggest headache. Then I see my mom running of the house shocked at me. " Jean what do you think your doing out here?!" my mom shouts at me. She helps me up to get ready for school. "I have no idea" i said holding my head, I was really dizzy. " Just because you are outside in the morning does not mean you don't have to go to school" she said shaking her head and opening the glass sliding back door. "even if you were acting weird yesterday"

    • 796 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Powerful Essays