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Free Japanese novelists Essays and Papers

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    The “Outsider” in Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea and Wonderful Fool The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea  Wonderful Fool   In designing the characters in a novel, frequently, an author includes a character who finds himself on the outside of the accepted society. This outsider character often finds himself at a disadvantage. The mere fact that he is unfamiliar in his society tends to create problems for the character to solve. After solving these problems, the character leaves

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    Thought Communication in The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea and Wonderful Fool In the novels The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea, by Yukio Mishima, and Wonderful Fool, by Shusaku Endo, the authors write in a way which allows the characters to speak directly to the reader through thoughts. This device lets the reader know exactly what the character is experiencing. Mishima and Endo's use of direct thought communication proves to be a beneficial aspect that aids the reader

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    amongst the characters. This manifests itself in how the relationships between characters in the work are characterized. Sometimes lack of proper respect can be an auxiliary cause for conflict, while in other cases it can be the root of it. In Japanese culture, respect is considered very important in the relationships between different people; for example, it is customary to bow to one's elders and respect those of superior knowledge and ability. Failure to show such respect is taken offensively

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    Naturalism and Realism

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    Throughout the early 1840’s up to the early 1900’s American authors were either classified as realist or naturalists. Realism is a faithful representation of life that focuses on middle class people and their problems and a form of writing where god is absent. Naturalism is an exaggerated form of realism where nature is an independent force. Some of these authors like Kate Chopin, Jack London, and Ambrose Bierce are all naturalist because of their exaggeration of life and life events. Stephen Crane

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    Annotated Bibliography Crash Course. “Holden, JD, and the Red Cap- The Catcher in the Rye Part 2: Crash Course English Literature #7.” Youtube. Youtube, 17 Jan. 2013. Web. 18 Nov. 2015. Crash Course is a Youtube channel that explains a plethora of topics that range from history to astronomy. John Green, author of The Fault in Our Stars, takes over the literature section and gives insight to the deeper meanings of many influential books, such as The Catcher in the Rye. In this second part of

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    Comparing Relationships in Susan Minot's Lust and Coraghessan Boyle's Carnal Knowledge "After the briskness of loving, loving stops"-Susan Minot This quote from Minot summarizes the love affairs in her short story "Lust" and T. Coraghessan Boyle's short story "Carnal Knowledge." The protagonists in these stories go to great lengths to please their significant others hoping to find loving, fulfilling relationships. They make sacrifices and relinquish certain degrees of power to find happiness

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    Ambiguity in literature after World War II reflects and explores issues of self and society. These two ideas often work against each other instead of coexisting to form a struggle-free existence. J. D. Salinger, Sylvia Plath, and Richard Heller illustrate this struggle with their works. These authors explore ambiguity through different characters that experience the world in different ways. Identity, while it is an easy concept, can be difficult to attain. These authors seek out ambiguity with

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    A Comparison of Birdsong and Regeneration how far do you agree that these writings produced in recent years about WW1 you should consider the genders of writer any themes and symbols which you have come across in wider reading comment specifically on language? Because bird song and regeneration were both written in the 1990s we see that there is a different atmosphere to some of the earlier works from such

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    Susan Glaspell's A Jury of Her Peers The North wind is blowing in Dickson County on this cold, March morning, and in Susan Glaspell’s, “A Jury of Her Peers,” murder bring together a group of men and two women, with two separate agendas. The men’s group who includes: Mr. Hale; a witness, Mr. Peters; the sheriff, and Mr. Henderson; the county attorney are persistent in finding evidence to ensure a conviction of Minnie (Foster) Wright; wife of the victim, John Wright. However, the two women: Mrs

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    When people tell stories they tend to be about what they know. One thing that most people know is the environment around them. They pick up habits from their family, friends, and neighbors. They begin to talk like them using dialect and slang inherent to their region. Also, it is not uncommon for people to write about a fictional community that is based from their own community. As community affects how we write, writing can also affect the community. In other words, communities influence authors

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