Free Japanese architecture Essays and Papers

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Free Japanese architecture Essays and Papers

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    Greek and Japanese Architecture For a great many years, architecture has been a breaking point for different artisticeras in history. Some of the most famous “works of art” have been chapels, temples, and tombs. Among the most dominant and influential eras of great architecture are the sophisticated, stoic Greeco-Roman periods and the more mystical, elemental Japanese eras. These two very distinct and very different eras have more in common than you may realize. When work began on the Parthenon

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    and built his own house, The Maekawa House, in 1941(Reynolds, 2001). Since the war was going on, he was only able to construct his home with limited materials (Reynolds, 2001). Nevertheless, he was still able to incorporate the traditional Japanese architecture with influences of the western style. The Maekawa House is considered to be modern because of the introduction it had of a different type of design in Japan (Reynolds, 2001). Maekawa obtained the traditional wood construction and spacious garden;

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    Religion has a big influence on Mesopotamian and Japanese architecture. Mesopotamia shifts their religious views to the concept of having multiple gods looking over them. This same concept influenced the Mesopotamians to build massive, tall structures called Ziggurats. The purpose to the ziggurat’s design was to enable the community a way to become closer to the gods, essentially as a passageway between heaven and earth. Japan on the other hand, centralizes their beliefs around Buddhism, Shintoism

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    The Japanese culture in very unique and opposes what most say is normal in their lifestyle. Japan is formed by a band of islands east of Asia in the Pacific Ocean. The islands stretch over 1360 miles from the northeast to the southwest. Japans total land area is smaller in size than the United States state of Montana. The four largest islands make up about 98 percent of the total land mass of the country. Due to the mountainous region, only about 15 percent of the land is able to be used for housing

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    Japanese Gardens are designed with a purpose, every detail has meaning and every element symbolizes something. Gardens were usually built for wealthy asristocrats or people of power. Early designs of Japanese gardens consisted of important religious influences and gave natural objects significance such as in Shinto, Buddhism, and Daoist Beliefs. In Shinto beliefs, gardens were designed as a purified and cleansed space for the arrival of kami. Kami are sacred spirits of Shinto and great rocks that

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    The Three Primary Spaces

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    away with what we have left of Japanese culture. Let us try to make a proper appraisal of the spaces of the beautiful Jikō-in. The idea that there is an intimate connection between the old Japanese heritage of a sense of space and the point at which Western architecture finally arrived was very strong after the War. This gave the Japanese people confidence and helped them to quickly recover from the defeat of the War ; however, it is quite clear that the beautiful Japanese spaces and the new spaces achieved

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    Kisho Kurokawa is a Japanese architect, who was born on April 8, 1934 in Kanie, Aichi. During Kurokawa’s Childhood it was bad times in Japan, Japan had just came back from war and many of the Country was destroyed. People were hungry and had very little. Kurokawa growing up had to burn books for heat and eat leafs that he found. His father, Miki Kurokawa was an architect but during that time busy repair and rebuilding Japan. His father later opened his own architecture company and built over 100

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    the highest achievement in Japanese castle architecture. The castle is the best-preserved example of the early 17th –century Japanese castle architecture. It serves as a classic example of Japanese castle architecture, having been designated a national treasure in 1931. Composed of 83 buildings with advanced systems of defense and innovative fortified devices dating from the beginning of the Shogun period, it is an architectural expression of the romanticized Japanese historic period, a period of

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    Diploma Art Extended Essay “To what extent does the ‘Jeju Project: Architecture of the Wind’ reflect the success of Itami Jun’s attempt to overcome his conflicting cultural identities through Architecture and Aesthetics?” Junha Hwang 111015 Word Count: 3411 Number of Pages: 25 Abstract As a Japanese-born Korean architect, Itami Jun faces a cultural conflict between the two nationalities, and his architecture and artworks have been highly influenced by his cultural background

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    Shigeru Ban Shigeru Ban is an architect born in Tokyo, Japan. Ban was formed in California. He is usually regarded as a traditional Japanese architect although he did not studied in his country. His work is characterized by the use of unconventional recycled materials. In 1986, Artek.Inc came to Ban and asked him to design a chair with a particular material named UPM. This material is created from the industrial waste of paper and plastic. Shigeru said, “They asked me to design some chair out

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