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    Frank in 'Eveline by James Joyce

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    1. Introduction The following paper will deal with the character Frank in James Joyce’s “Eveline” from his collection of short stories Dubliners. The focus of this paper will be to investigate whether Frank’s motivations for taking the story’s main character Eveline with him are based on honest romantic feelings towards her or whether he fits the stereotypical picture of the sailor who is “yarning a girl into his bed in every port” (Ingersoll 59) and rather uses her. So the research question of

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    University of Toronto Quarterly 48.4 (1979): 303-312. Project MUSE. Web. 22 Oct. 2016. Cooper argues Jones ' mastery of visual description in In Parenthesis. In Paragraphs seven through thirteen, Cooper compares In Parenthesis to James Joyce 's “Araby,” and attributes the same qualities to Joyce 's writing. He makes the point that both have “a highly developed feeling for space, form, and color” (306.) He then follows up with an example from Joyce 's text. This opinion of Joyce 's writing style parallels

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    Sensory Overload in James Joyce's Ulysses

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    Sensory Overload in James Joyce's Ulysses In writing about the experience of reading Ulysses, one critic has commented that "it's rather like wearing earphones plugged into someone's brain, and monitoring an endless tape-recording of the subject's impressions, reflections, questions, memories and fantasies, as they are triggered either by physical sensations or the association of ideas" (Lodge 47). Indeed, the aural sense plays a crucial role throughout much of the novel. But in the "Wandering

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    James Augustine Aloysius Joyce was born in a wealthy suburb of Ireland just south of Dublin on February 2, 1882. The Joyce family was considered of the upper class and had blood lines that could be traced back to old Irish nobility in the country. Their "noble" blood did not prove to be enough to maintain their social status, the family's position in society steadily declined as James Joyce aged, and he was constantly moving to more modest residences, a main cause of this was due to James' father

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    Cassidy-Payson 9 Life?s Cruelty in James Joyce?s ?Araby? While reading James Joyce?s ?Araby? you can see very vivid settings, characters and you can also find a lot of symbols with different meanings. In ?Araby? Joyce uses Ireland during the early 20th century as the setting of the story during a time that Ireland was a very dark and depressing place. Through Joyce?s use of symbols, unique characters and settings he captures how life can be dark and cruel at times. Joyce is able to describe the setting

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    Literary Analysis: Clay and The Dead

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    fifteen Dubliners stories, city life, religion, friends and family bring hope to individuals discovering what it means to be human. Two stories stood out in James Joyce’s Dubliners. One story attempts to mislead readers as it is hard to follow and the other story is the most famous story in the book. In the stories “Clay” and “The Dead,” James Joyce uses escape themes to deal with the emotions of the characters, Maria and Gabriel living in the Dublin society. Both stories take place during the winter

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    Comparing Updike's A&P and Joyce's Araby

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    Comparing Updike's A & P and Joyce's Araby John Updike's A & P and James Joyce's Araby share many of the same literary traits. The primary focus of the two stories revolves around a young man who is compelled to decipher the difference between cruel reality and the fantasies of romance that play in his head. That the man does, indeed, discover the difference is what sets him off into emotional collapse. One of the main similarities between the two stories is the fact that the main character

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    Gabriel's Epiphany in The Dead by James Joyce Many people in society feel alienated from the world and separated from their fellow man while others may try to find meaning where none exists.  In James Joyce's "The Dead," Gabriel Conroy faces these problems and questions his own identity due to a series of internal attacks and external factors that lead him to an epiphany about his relation to the world; this epiphany grants him a new beginning.  The progression in Gabriel from one who feels

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    Worthy Essence

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    A Raisin in the Sun and Alice Walker’s story Everyday Use, the reader learns how the rejection of assimilation affects both the characters of Beneatha and Dee. In both texts, the reader can ... ... middle of paper ... ...lzer, Sondra. “James Joyce Quarterly.” In the Beginning There Was “Eveline” 16.4 (1979): 479-85. Print. Rollison, Rob. "Introduction to Poetry, by Billy Collins." The Poetry Room. N.p., 05 June 2012. Web. 20 Apr. 2014. Shmoop Editorial Team. "Beneatha Younger in A Raisin in the

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    the complex works of James Joyce.  On a deeper level, though, the poem suggests an important aspect of Joyce's prose.  Arnold's poem is often singled out as a prime exa... ... middle of paper ... ....  New  York:  Penguin, 1976. Levin, Harry.  "The Artist." James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man:   Text, Criticism, and Notes.  Ed.  Chester G. Anderson.  New York:  Penguin,  1968.  399-415. Loe, Thomas.  "'The Dead' as Novella."  James Joyce Quarterly 28 (1991):  485-98.

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