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    Suicide In Jails

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    Suicide In Jails The United States is plagued by a countless number of social dilemmas. Although not in constant public scrutiny, suicide is a serious problem which has seemed to have lost importance. When suicide is coupled with arrest and incarceration it becomes an increasingly complex situation. In fact, research indicates that the jail suicide rate ranges from 2.5 to 13 times greater than the rate of the general population (Winkler 1992). Motivation, prediction, and prevention of suicidal

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    gender issues in jails

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    article I chose is titled Gender Issues in the New Generation Jail, by Patrick G. Jackson, and Cindy A. Stearns. The source for this article is the Prison Journal. The article explains how men and women in the new jails have adapted. The definition of the new jail is a fifty-person pod style jail. The old jail was considered to be inhumane, disgusting, and have many blind spots. The problems in the old jails were growing year by year. The new jail comes furnished with televisions, separate showers, a phone

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    Behind the Scenes of the County Jail Someone, suspected of a crime, is arrested by police. Later on, the suspect goes to court to face their charges. A classic episode of Law & Order. But, where do these suspects go in between the two events. They are held in their local jail of course. While people are familiar with the arrest and courtroom scenes from TV, many are unfamiliar with the jail scene, which becomes home to the suspects who cannot make bail until a court rules a verdict for

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    The Long and Winding Road: How Jails Came to Be in America [The guards here believe that] the tougher, colder, and more cruel and inhuman a place is, the less chance a person will return. This is not true. The more negative experiences a person goes through, the more he turns into a violent, cruel, mean, heartless individual, I know this to be a fact – Annonymous Prisoner, “The Trauma of Prison Rape” (Manner 130) The prisoner described the truth of jails as he is experiencing them now, while the

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    Letter from a Birmingham Jail

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    Letter from a Birmingham Jail Is an individual ever morally justified in breaking a law?  The answer to this question is yes.  There are several reasons that have made me believe that it is morally justifiable in breaking the law; however the most convincing comes from Dr. Martin Luther King in his letter from a Birmingham Jail.  " We can never forget what that everything Hitler did in Germany was legal..." (Classic Arguments 668).  King went on in his letter to say that it would

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    tension is the past. For many years blacks were mistreated and abused based solely on the color of the skin. In Martin Luther King J.R.'s "Letter from Birmingham  Jail", he uses references to the past and people of the past to strengthen his point. The actions in the past and present can affect the future. In "Letter from Birmingham Jail", King uses references to Saints, philosophers of the past, and theologians to get into the minds of the clergymen to whom he is writing the letter. By using the

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    Jail Time Those blocks (block, block, block) in just plain gray (gray, gray, gray): the perfect surroundings to leave one's mind blank... or insane. Ow. My head hurts. It has been lying against this wall for at least an hour now. I scratched the back of my head to move around my dark, curly hair. It was beginning to feel plastered against my scalp. It was a bit tangled from not brushing it for a day and my fingers did not run through it with ease; nevertheless, it felt good to keep the blood

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    We MUST Keep Repeat Offenders in Jail Why do killers, rapists, and child molesters go free? A large portion of early release prisoners commit serious crimes after being released. In fact, "in a three year follow-up of 108,850 state prisoners released in 1983 from institutions in 11 states, within three years sixty percent of violent crime offenders were re-arrested. More than half of those charged with violent crimes were discharged within two years."(from Truth In Sentencing by James Wooton)

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    States across the nation have seat belt laws in place that make it a requirement for drivers and passengers in vehicles that are being operated on public streets to wear some sort of safety belt. In 1998, 41,471 people were killed in 6,334,000 reported motor vehicle accidents in the United States. Seat belts are estimated to save 9,500 lives each year, and statistics show a higher degree of seat-belt use in states that aggressively enforce seat belt laws. The laws, as well as the punishments available

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    law. Our country deals with these drug-addicted offenders by placing them in jails for a year or longer, only to have them come back out to society when their sentence is over. They are still drug-addicts and so they return to the street only to commit yet another crime. From here the cycle of crime, arrest, jail, and return to society continues, solving absolutely nothing. Therefore, placing drug-addicted offenders in jails fails to confront the major problem at hand which is that of the drug abuse

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    Comparing Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience and Martin Luther King's Letter From a Birmingham Jail The two essays, "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, and "Letter From a Birmingham Jail," by Martin Luther King, Jr., effectively illustrate the authors' opinions of justice. Each author has his main point; Thoreau, in dealing with justice as it relates to government, asks for "not at once no government, but at once a better government. King contends that "injustice anywhere is a threat to

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    The Heroine of Louise Shivers' Here to Get My Baby Out of Jail Sleeping Beauty's father was a king who loved his daughter dearly. Unfortunately, however, he forgot to invite one of the oldest and most powerful of the fairies to the celebration of his daughter's christening. Because of his forgetfulness, the princess was sentenced to one hundred years of sleep and inactivity. She was saved by a prince who made his way to her bedside and awakened her with a kiss of true love. Of course, they celebrated

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    Birmingham Jail

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    Letter From Birmingham Jail By: Austin Ignatovich 11/18/15 Martin Luther King (MLK) Jr. was one of the bravest protesters for the civil rights movement and was also very well educated. In his letter from a Birmingham Jail to his “fellow Clergymen” he answers some questions the Clergymen have on his actions and views about the civil rights movement. MLK’s contemplative tone shows that he knows what what he wants to do and exactly how to do it. He knows what time of year to do it, where to do it

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    Letter from a Birmingham Jail and The Declaration of Individualism Although the time periods and goals may be different the method for bringing about change is usually the same, this method is protest.   This method is supported by two different people, in two different time periods, with two different goals; these two people are Thomas Jefferson and Martin Luther King Junior. Martin Luther King Junior's letter from a Birmingham Jail was an expression of his encouragement for protest against

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    Letter To Birmingham Jail

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    While Martin Luther King Jr. was imprisoned in Birmingham Jail King wrote his “Letter from Birmingham Jail”. In the “Letter from Birmingham Jail”, King responds to the eight clergymen about the injustice and problems in society that he and his race face. He also tells the clergymen about non-violent direct action and how he and his people have waited too long by saying “Justice too long delayed is justice denied” (par. 11), and that action must be taken in order for them to fight for their goal of

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    My Dear Fellow Clergymen: While confined here in the Birmingham city jail, I came across your recent statement calling my present activities "unwise and untimely." Seldom do I pause to answer criticism of my work and ideas. If I sought to answer all the criticisms that cross my desk, my secretaries would have little time for anything other than such correspondence in the course of the day, and I would have no time for constructive work. But since I feel that you are men of genuine good will and that

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    Birmingham Jail Letter

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    Martin Luther King, a leader of the protest against prejudice was able to pursue the rights for African American people. Eight of his fellow clergymen criticized his procedure to protest, but they still supported him. In the "Letter from Birmingham Jail", King wanted to encourage others to rebel against the wrong, even if it is not wise it is right, he was optimistic and yet disappointed. In order for him to convey his tone and justification he reaches out to people by using allusion, analogy, and

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    Martin Luther King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail” is an excellent example of an effective argument; it was written in response to an editorial addressing the issue of Negro demonstrations and segregation in Alabama at the time. He writes in a way that makes his argument approachable; he is not attacking his opposition, which consists of eight Alabama clergymen who wrote the editorial. This is illustrated in his opening sentence: “My dear Fellow Clergymen” (464). King was an activist for civil

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    Birmingham Jail Tactics

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    This essay will discuss the strategies deployed during the protest demonstrations in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1963 as well as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s rationale for conducting the demonstrations as he expressed in his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail and if the demonstrations were deemed a success. Leaders from the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights (ACMHR) met with Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) members to plan the strategy for demonstration in Birmingham. The campaign

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    Pathos in MLK, Jr.'s Letter from Birmingham Jail In his "Letter," Martin Luther King Jr.'s ability to effectively use pathos, or to appeal to the emotions of his audiences, is evident in a variety of places. More particularly in paragraph fourteen, King demonstrates his ability to inspire his fellow civil rights activists, invoke empathy in the hearts of white moderates, and create compassion in the minds of the eight clergyman to which the "Letter" is directed. In response to the clergyman's

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