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Free Jacques Lacan Essays and Papers

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    Jacques Lacan

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    The theories of Jacques Lacan give explanation and intention to the narrator’s actions throughout the novel “Surfacing”. Although Margaret Atwood may not have had any knowledge of the French psychoanalyst’s philosophies, I feel that both were making inferences on behavior and psychology and that the two undeniably synchronize with each other. I will first identify the complex philosophies of Jacques Lacan and then demonstrate how the narrator falls outside of Lacan’s view of society and how this

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    Freud vs. Jacques Lacan The story of Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus has been interpreted by innumerable writers, philosophers, and critics in countless ways; the methods of interpreting Oedipus vary from mad rages and blind accusations to ignorantly perverse acts ranging from basic sexual desire to pre-destined fate ordained by the gods. Perhaps the most famous psychoanalyst in history Sigmund Freud theorized that Oedipus' story was applicable to all. French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan translated

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    The Portrayal of Women in Advertising

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    be published in the influential British film journey screen. (Hein,2008) Her written views have achieved to shift the perception of film theories conventional structure known as psychoanalytic, which were written about by Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan. Lacan was to have primarily came up with the theory and was originally identified as the “gaze”. His use was to define the anxious state that derives with the awareness that one could be viewed. He argues that a person loses a sense of “autonomy”

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    the conscious (Bressler 121). In Jacques Lacan’s essay “The Agency of the Letter in the Unconscious or Reason since Freud,” he agrees with Freud’s claims that the unconscious influences our behavior and actions. As a result, Lacan created three different categories to explain the transformation from infant to adulthood, namely need, demand, and desire and labeled these three psychoanalytic orders, as the Imaginary, the Symbolic and the Real stage. Lacan claims that during the Symbolic stage

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    Word-association in Oedipus The King

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    audience's perception of Oedipus through oral dramatic presentation. "Lacan insists that dialogue is the place where a certain subject comes into being, or perhaps more properly, where the subject comes into being in a certain kind of way" (Lee 38) Jacques Lacan deals with the perception of individuals as well. However Lacan's perceptions are those dealt with in the mind of his subjects. Let us introduce Oedipus, as the subject, to Lacan the psychoanalyst. Now that the two have met in our minds' we can

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    Unconscious Desire

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    that want to be exposed through the conscious (Bressler 121). In Jacques Lacan’s essay “The Agency of the Letter in the Unconscious or Reason since Freud,” he agrees with Freud’s claims that the unconscious influences our behavior. Lacan created three categories to explain the transformation from infant to adult, namely need, demand, and desire and labels these three parts as the Imaginary, the Symbolic and the Real stage. Lacan claims that during the Symbolic stage the child is initiated to language

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    Literature Review

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    According to Jacques Lacan’s (in Sarup 1993:6) theory of the self, society is located in each individual therefore we cannot separate the two. Society is located in each individual as the self cannot be understood outside society, which is interpreted through language. Globalisation standardised society as there is a continuous flow of information, shrinking the world into a global village (in Sturken & Cartwright 2001:317). Thus, the effects that globalisation has had on society can be seen to affect

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    child at the moment when the child, still in state of dependency, identifies its reflection in the mirror. The child is then left to the mercy of the gigantic and fiendish realization that it may never again become unified with the ideal-I, or as Jacques Lacan names it, the Gestalt. The Gestalt represents the "rigid structure of the subject's entire mental development," an ideal goal that cannot be obtained, and the subject "will only rejoin the coming-into-being of the subject asymptotically. This is

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    Perversity and Lawrence’s Prussian Officer

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    a can is completely subjective.  It's nothing but a trigger for my pre-existing notion of a can. SIGNIFIER (CAN) SIGN =SIGNIFIED (CYLINDRICAL CONTAINER) Actual meaning comes from the thing itself, rather than our word for it.  Jacques Lacan modified Saussure's original algorithm so that the signifier dominated the signified.  We have many words for the same object.  For example, the adjectives ugly, unattractive, hideous, revolting, and homely describe a less-than-desirable state

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    The Greaty Gatsby is not only Fitzgerald's best work, but it is one of the greatest pieces of literature to ever have been published in the United States. This all time classic offers an accurate depiction of the Roaring Twenties, as it exposes the decadence and loss of morality hidden beneath the luxury of the times. Popular interpretations present the novel as a critical review of class issues and the social situation existent in the 1920s, as well as Fitzgerald's commentary on the American Dream

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