Free J. D. Salinger Essays and Papers

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Free J. D. Salinger Essays and Papers

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    The theme of The Catcher in the Rye is simple. J. D. Salinger uses this novel to draw a clear distinction between the purity of childhood and the wickedness attained when one reaches adulthood. Salinger uses multiple literary devices including diction, symbolism, tone, and even the title of the novel to drive home his ideas about the innocence of children and the corruption of the world. The form of diction used in The Catcher in the Rye is a topic on which many people are strongly opinionated.

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    example is Rachel Canning, who rebelled against her parents and ultimately sued them. The idiosyncrasies of teenagers are inevitable; it was present ninety years ago, and it will surely be present ninety years from now. Works Cited Salinger, J. D. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, 1951. Print. Powers, Richard. "1950s Teenagers." 1950s Teenagers. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Mar. 2014. "20th Century Teenagers." Fofweb.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Mar. 2014. Schrum, Kelly. "Teenagers." Encyclopedia

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    The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger shows the transition of a young teenager who struggles to find himself in the adult world. Holden Caulfield encounters many different elements that he had been influenced by the world around him. He views the world full of “perverts” and “phonies”. As a result of his views, Holden withdraws from society because he believes society is “broken” and very flawed. Holden’s view of society is developed based on his experiences such as the death of his brother, flunking

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    School.” Parts of Salinger’s school life can clearly be seen from this statement because at the age of 13, Salinger attended McBurney School and managed the fencing team there. After McBurney School, at the age of 15, Salinger “was sent to Valley Forge Military Academy in Pennsylvania, which was later the inspiration for Pencey Prep” (as said by www.nndb.com). This reveals how Salinger incorporated his childhood/school life in The Catcher in the Rye. Later on, Holden begins to describe Ackley

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    J.D. Salinger's A Catcher in the Rye

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    reasons for books to be censored. Despite being a worldwide best seller, J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye has been on the banned books list since 1961 ( (Baldassarro). The Catcher in the Rye tells the short journey, of anti-hero Holden Caulfield, between the end of the fall semester and Christmas break (Salinger). The story begins when Holden is expelled from his school, Pency Prep, for failing a majority of his classes (Salinger). Holden knows he must return home, so he attempts to prolong the scolding

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    the nonexistent members of our world. J.D. Salinger explores this elusive innocence in his short story, "A Perfect Day for Bananafish." Distinct similarities appear between the main character, Seymour Glass, and Salinger including the World War II experience and attraction for younger, more innocent people (Salerno). Salinger conveys this through Seymour’s preference of a young girl’s company over his own wife's company. Throughout the story, “Salinger constantly draws attention to himself and his

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    A major event in Holden’s life, in “The Catcher in the Rye” by J. D. Salinger is when Holden’s brother Allie dies. Allie’s death leads holden to being unable to let go of the past, he does not like any form of change, and he is afraid of being alone. Due to Allie dieing, Holden is unable to let go of the past. One example of this is when Stradlater, Holden’s roommate at Pencey goes on a date with Jane Gallagher, a girl that Holden used to know Holden says that “I kept thinking about Jane, and about

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    Ever since I read ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ – I was 17 then – I have tried to explain myself why this book is so significant. Why is it so hated and adored at the same time? I must confess I hadn’t heard anything about Salinger till I watched ‘Conspiracy Theory’. If you don’t remember I’ll tell you that the movie was about this taxi driver Jerry Fletcher who traced conspiracy in everything and all of sudden one of his theories came to be true. Mel Gibson was incredible playing a man who was

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    There is Light

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    Holden, the main character of Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, alienates himself from humanity and searches for an ideal world that can transcend time. From having a date with his old girlfriend to an encounter with a prostitute, Holden must confront his preconceived notions of the world and accept reality. Although women in the book have simple personalities and are rarely illuminated through Holden’s digressive character, J. D. Salinger uses Holden’s interactions with Jane, Sally, Phoebe and

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    Modern Society’s Demands

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    has set certain standards that they expect everyone to conform to, but in The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger Holden Caulfield is used to show what happens when humans do not conform to society’s wishes. J.D. Salinger uses Holden Caulfield to tell some of his own story and to show the consequences of not conforming to society and how society will eventually force everyone to conform. Salinger subtly points out may of societies demands, such as growing up and understanding sex. Holden refuses to

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