Free J. D. Salinger Essays and Papers

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Free J. D. Salinger Essays and Papers

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    kind of connection, but he could only discern desolation and loneliness. Dismally, he is repudiated by all the people who he try to talk to and is confronted with rejection and dissent from society. The novel, The Catcher in the Rye, written by J.D Salinger, accentuates the obliteration for oneself to be fraternized and associated. The author portrays Holden's early childhood as a period of ignorance and innocence, and depicts how he carries a fear of failing to possess the courage to be candid and

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    Period 9 March 2014 Falling Holden Caulfield, the main character in The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, is a troubled teenager living in a society full of “phonies”. Throughout the course of the book Holden is trying to protect children from losing their innocence, playing his role of the catcher in the rye. What Holden ends up learning is that growing up is necessary and we all end up falling. Salinger demonstrates use of physical description of falling which leads to a metaphorical fall for Holden

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    In a post World War II era, when all the men are returning from war and glad to be home and realize that it completely different now that people have returned. J.D. Salinger an author who writes the realistic viewpoint hat occurs in many people and then reflects into his literature. Such as a boy named Teddy who simply a child with little responsibility on a cruise ship with his parents, a couple highly regarded socialites, Seymour Glass a man married to a high class materialistic women who clings

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    J.D. Salinger conveys The Catcher in the Rye’s meaning by combining three of the novel’s elements: Holden’s personality, resistance to having guidance in his life, and actions. Primarily, he uses Holden, The Catcher in the Rye’s protagonist, as an example of a teenager who has failed to develop during the essential period of youth. Additionally, he uses the characters of Mr. Spencer and Mr. Antolini to act as voices of reason to Holden, while also showing Holden’s missed opportunities in life when

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    them lived in New York City, Holden’s desire to neglect society and migrating to different locations became a reality for Salinger, as he started living in a different area, New Hemisphere according to Encyclopædia Britannica, In his book, the author J.D. Salinger, expands on discrepancies between childhood and adulthood. By enhancing the disparity between purity and filth, Salinger portraits his own view of the world as

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    Who Am I? A look inside Holden, Seymour, and Salinger from three acclaimed works. After World War II J.D. Salinger joined the ranks of the exceptionally adept authors that came about after the heinous second world war. Salinger, fueled by his experiences from the war, addressed many concerns and issues, most of which are timeless. Due to many of his astounding pieces, and his fresh outlook on society, is considered a phenomenal, classic, American author. One that is responsible for many renowned

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    from any other work of literature is the attributes that make this novel so relatable. The source of this raw, real emotion that completely captivates the reader is Salinger himself. The Catcher in the Rye ‘s main character Holden Caulfield is undeniably Salinger. This work of fiction nearly resembles an autobiography. J.D. Salinger uses his novel to express his disillusionment through motifs, pathos, and symbols. The most noticeable motif throughout the novel is Holden’s constant involvement

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    because their aspirations are killed, and the things they notice are discredited. The novel, Catcher in the Rye, by J.D Salinger, is told from a teenager’s, Holden’s, perspective. This novel is about how Holden has difficulty connecting to people because most adults and teenagers can not understand why he is so depressed by the world. In the novel, Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger, the author, proves that teenagers’ role is to

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    described as a lost spirit who sees himself as being fundamentally different from his social environment following his wartime experience; he leaves the war “seeing-more” and as a result, awakens to find that he has lost touch with the material world. Salinger uses the story’s dialog as the medium for conveying Seymour’s struggle; he establishes the shallow nature of the environment Seymour is exposed to using the dialog between Muriel and her Mother while simultaneously giving clues about Seymour’s character

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    The Catcher In The Rye and Looking For Alaska, two American novels about young adulthood, provide an insight on the commonalities and differences between these two generations and their unique American experiences. The two novels written by J.D. Salinger and John Green, respectively, were written fifty-four years apart, but their similarities are nonpareil. In fact, Green cites The Catcher In The Rye as an inspiration for his novel. The Catcher In The Rye and Looking For Alaska display similarities

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