Free Ithaca Essays and Papers

Sort By:
Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays

Free Ithaca Essays and Papers

Page 1 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Ithaca

    • 1501 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Ithaca When you set out on your journey to Ithaca pray that the road is long, full of adventure, full of knowledge.' Constantinos Kavafis, Ithaca (1911) Ithaca, a Greek island in the lonean Sea, was the island that gave birth to Ulysses, one of the smartest Greek commanders, who through his invention of the `Trojan Horse' led the Greeks to a victory over the Trojans. Immediately after this victory, Ulysses set out on his journey to return to Ithaca. To return home, to kiss his wife, to see

    • 1501 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Ithaca by C.P. Cavafy

    • 745 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Ithaca by C.P. Cavafy Everyone is given the opportunity to take the odyssey that is "life, however it is important to make the journey as memorable as one possibly can. The poem "Ithaca" by C.P. Cavafy suggests that what is most important in life is the experience that is incorporated with the journey, not necessarily just reaching the ultimate goal. It is the quest, not the destination which matters most. This message is conveyed through the poem through the use of allusion, myth and symbolism

    • 745 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    James Joyce's Ulysses - Balancing Information in Ithaca "I hold this book [Ulysses] to be the most important expression which the present age has found; it is a book to which we are all indebted, and from which none of us can escape. " T.S. Elliot In the midst of 'Ithaca,' the climactic second to last episode of Ulysses, James Joyce provides the necessary information for calculating how much excrement, in pounds, is produced annually by the entire population of Ireland (p. 718). The type

    • 3235 Words
    • 7 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    episodes, readers can relate to their own struggles in life and how these experiences shape who they become. Two poets who have encompassed this theme of learning from one’s struggle include Constantine Cavafy and Alfred Lord Tennyson. In Cavafy’s “Ithaca,” Cavafy urges readers to live life for the journey rather than the goal of living life. Similarly in Tennyson’s “Ulysses,” Tennyson inspires readers to continue to explore life rather than settling and retiring. These two poems bring a more profound

    • 907 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Ithaca

    • 1571 Words
    • 4 Pages

    poems about events and situations that they could never have imagined (Epstein 4). “Cavafy’s achievement was somehow to write outside time by anchoring his writing as firmly as possible inside time” (Epstein 4). In the year 1911 Cavafy produced “Ithaca” (Ithaka), which was one of his best poem’s, at the age of forty-eight (Epstein 3). This poem is truly one that captures the readers mind and makes him or her think about life. This poem translates into real life situations that many people will

    • 1571 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Subsystems in Ithaca

    • 1271 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited

    Death, destruction, disorder; this was what was destined to engulf Ithaca had Odysseus not been able to return home and reclaim his place at the head of Achaean society. The basis of a civilization’s culture is made up of five subsystems according to Colin Renfrew in his Emergence of Civilisation. Renfrew’s five subsystems are named as subsistence, technological, social/ political, symbolic, and trade/ communication. These subsystems are all interconnected, allowing for actions to exist in multiple

    • 1271 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Penelope Of Ithaca

    • 716 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Penelope of Ithaca Penelope was the daughter of Icarius, of Sparta. Her father was the brother of Tyndareus, making her a cousin to Helen of Troy, and Clytemnestra. It was during the contest for Helen's hand that Odysseus was able to wed Penelope. Odysseus knew he had little chance of winning Helen, as he was not as wealthy as some of the other suitors; he instead used his greatest asset, cunning, to secure a wife. He approached Tyndareus with the offer of a trade; in exchange for Penelope's

    • 716 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    sail on Poseidon's waters back to Ithaca. Pride is good to have, but in Odysseus’s case, it’s a little too much. On the other hand, he does things that make him a great hero. When Circeturned his crew into animals, he climbed straight up a mountain, risking his life just to save his crew. He will do anything to get back to Ithaca and see his wife and son, no matter how crazy it is. He even goes into the underworld to speak to a prophet about how to get back to Ithaca. Being  brave and courageous is

    • 691 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Odysseus Lessons

    • 604 Words
    • 2 Pages

    information on how to get home to Ithaca. One of many gods that helped him was Aedus. Aedus gave him a bag of bad winds to get him home to Ithaca. All the winds were in the bag except for the west wind. The west wind will get him and his men home safely unless the bag is opened. If the bags of winds were to open all the winds would get out, and Odysseus would get turned back even further away from Ithaca. Odysseus learned many lessons during his journey home to Ithaca. One of his lessons was that

    • 604 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Odysseus tells Athena, whom he believes is a shepherd, a false account, of how he came to Ithaca, primarily since he needs to keep his identity a secret, familiarize himself with the situation on Ithaca and formulate a plan to execute the suitors. He perceives that he has arrived in a mist-shrouded and unknown land. And thus secondarily, he needs to present a feasible reason for being alone and stranded with copious amounts of treasure for safety reasons as well as to allay suspicion in relation

    • 1098 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
Previous
Page12345678950