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    Mumbo Jumbo by Ishmael Reed

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    Mumbo Jumbo by Ishmael Reed Mumbo Jumbo is a novel about writing itself ? not only in the figurative sense of the postmodern, elf-reflexive text but also in a literal sense? [It] is both a book about texts and a book of texts, a composite narrative of subtexts, pretexts, posttexts, and narratives within narratives. It is both a definition of afro American culture and its deflation. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Author of The Signifying Monkey Mumbo Jumbo is Ishmael Reed?s third novel and by

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    Problem of Place in America" and "My Neighborhood": The Breakdown of Community WR 121 Paper #2 In Ray Oldenburg's "The Problem of Place in America" and Ishmael Reed's "My Neighborhood" the authors express thier dissatisfaction with the community. Oldenburg focuses on the lack of a "third place" and the effects of consumerism on the suburbs, while Reed recalls his experience with prejudice communities. Their aim is to identify problems in our society that they find to be a problem. Although neither of

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    Jes Grew

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    Ishmael Reed, through parody, allusion, and satire, manages to convey the meaning of Jes Grew without once explicitly defining it. There is a good reason why he never defines it; Jes Grew has no true definition. Even those infected by this ?anti-plague? that evokes the jump, jive, and wail, do what you feel like spirit inside of them, can?t put their finger on exactly what is ?this Jes Grew thing? (33). One cannot explain Jes Grew without destroying its carefree feeling. Yet without ?finding its

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    Tradition and Ancestry in Ishmael Reed's Mumbo Jumbo In the Western industrialized world, time is seen as a progression of events, the present building on the past as civilization becomes more "advanced." However, in the African conception of time, "the human being goes backward ...he is oriented toward the world of the ancestors, toward those who no longer belong to the world of the living" (Zahan 45). Ishmael Reed's Mumbo Jumbo problematizes the relationship between past and present

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    The Masterpiece of Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle

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    exemplified with the opening line "Call me  Jonah" (Vonnegut 11). The line is a parody of  the first line  of Melville's most-famous  Moby Dick.  Literary critic  Peter Reed  points out  that "it  is characteristic  that Vonnegut's  speaker should  be a Jonah, who does in  effect get swallowed by the  whale, rather than a whale-hunting Ishmael"  (Reed 124). If  the reader was  to examine  the  use  of  this  line,  he  would recognize that Vonnegut's intent and purpose is not to provide a reasonable and  serious 

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    Moby Dick

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    Moby Dick is an extremely long novel written by Herman Melville. This book is an epic tale of a crazed sea captain hunting the whale that bit off his leg told through the eyes of a school teacher. As the story begins Ishmael is at the local boating dock looking for work. Ishmael being a school teacher has allot of time off as of the moment because the school is at recess, for what reason i don't know. He is in a tavern talking amongst the whalers. He asks if they know of any ships on witch he could

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    Moby Dick: Symbols To Draw Attention

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    interesting to its readers. At the beginning of the novel, the characters Ishmael and Queequeg are introduced. Ishmael is the narrator of the story. He is also a merchant seaman who signs up for a whaling voyage to see the world- and the only crewmember to survive and tell us the story. Queequeg is a tattooed cannibal from the South Seas. He is courageous, as well as kind-hearted. (Cavendish) After becoming friends with Ishmael, he also signs up for whaling and becomes a harpooner. Melville chose to

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    bible women

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    Rebekah The values in Genesis are disobeyed by yet another woman who does not conform to the female model of a fertile mother. While fertility is an overriding value in god’s human construct that women in Genesis threaten to undermine women also obstruct the “natural” course of history which god has set in motion as part of his ideal world. After god reconstructs the world through Noah and then Abraham, the divine element withdraws from the world slightly, and a natural historical course begins

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    Events of The Patriarchs Lives

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    In the events of the patriarchs' lives by which the foundations of the nation Israel were laid, begins with the life and Faith of Abram’s obedience to the covenant of God, before his name was changed to Abraham. Moses still being the great Patriarch of the scriptures explains the existence of how the founding fathers Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, began as these great leaders, he starts by telling their life story, which began with the day Abram was born and received the call of God. (Genesis 12-50)

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    Comparing the Bible and Margaret Laurence's The Stone Angel: An Examination of Archetypal References Often times great novels and plays allude to religion, to mythology, or to other literary works for dramatic purposes. Shakespearean plays are perfect examples. Allusions help the reader or spectator better understand, through visualization, a character or an event in a novel. In some cases, the characters, the events, or a series of events are structured according to the people and the action

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