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    Functional Irrationality

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    Functional Irrationality (1) I. Introduction The view that some forms of irrationality may serve a useful purpose is being increasingly entertained, despite the disquiet it elicits. The reason for the disquiet isn't difficult to discern, for if the view were made good it might threaten the unqualified normative primacy that rationality enjoys in the evaluation of thoughts, beliefs, intentions, decisions and actions. In terms of the predominant "rational explanation" model, reasons both generate

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    Irrationality in “Rational Gaze”

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    The phrase, “Rational Gaze”, is extremely misinterpreted. As Ayn Rand defines, rationality is the virtue to recognize and accept that one’s only source of knowledge is their ability to reason. Thus, rationality is very unique and individualistic. It has no boundaries. However, rationality is misinterpreted as the disposition to act in unanimity with other human beings, in order to obtain knowledge from nature. This skewed definition of rationality leads to confusion and unattainable anxiety. The

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    Reason and Irrationality in King Lear In King Lear, Shakespeare deals with the issue of reason and irrationality namely by contrasting the Machiavellian tactics of Goneril, Regan, and Edmund with the love Edgar, Gloster, Lear, and Cordelia experience. In doing so, he makes a very profound statement about the nature of human existence—he condemns reason and natural order while promoting the most nonsensical thing in the world: human love. From the text, I ascertain that Shakespeare believes that

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    Mormon Irrationality or Magical Thinking I am regularly (such as last night) in conversation with well-educated Mormons who struggle when trying to deal with rational concepts related to things like science, investment strategies, politics and other purely secular matters. And I see in their struggles infections likely attributable to the magical thinking at the heart of what is required these days to be a literally believing Mormon. The conversation in which I participated last night that caused

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    How Genuine is the Paradox of Irrationality?

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    How Genuine is the Paradox of Irrationality? ABSTRACT: In light of interpreting a paradox of irrationality, vaguely expressed by Donald Davidson in the context of explaining weakness of will, I attempt to show that it contains a significant thesis regarding the cognitive as well as motivational basis of our normative practice. First, an irrational act must involve both a rational element and a non-rational element at its core. Second, irrationality entails free and intentional violation of fundamental

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    In the play Romeo and Juliet ,by Shakespeare we are constantly bombarded with different meanings of words, contrasts, and characters who are quite irrational. They wish things upon themselves, and when they happen, are astonished. This piece of literature is filled with situations where the character intends one thing to happen, but his results are completely different. Throughout the following paragraphs the reader is to decide if the examples shown display opposite results from the original plan

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    Social Issues

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    control may involve a company's ability to predict and control consumer behavior, not the consumer's ability to predict what kind of product or control what kind of service he gets. Ritzer calls such breakdowns "the irrationality of rationalization." Ritzer points out the irrationality of rationality, as all of the supposed benefits of Mcdonaldized systems backfire: waiting in long lines, suspect quality, little or no customer service, little or no customer service, the illusion of large quantities

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    Liberty And Paternalism

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    LIBERTY AND PATERNALISM John Stuart Mill and Gerald Dworkin have distinctly opposing views on legal paternalism in that Mill is adamantly against any form of paternalism, whereas Dworkin believes that there do exist circumstances in which paternalism is justified. Both agree that paternalism is justified when the well being of another person is violated or put at risk. Mill takes on a utilitarian argument, explaining that allowing an individual to exercise his freedom of free choice is more beneficial

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    Freedom

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    here but I think the good will should be substituted with irrationality. For example in order to maintain the title rational while conforming to society's dictated rationality, one must do the following. Allow our irrational thoughts and ideas to manifest themselves in private and then refine and hide them for public display. When an individual is accepted or titled as rational they are universally accepted (universal law). Irrationality must be well disguised at first to gain universal acceptance

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    Although Girard’s second chapter of The Scapegoat may discuss persecution among certain groups of people because of false perceptions, it is really about people's desires to utilize scapegoats as a way of justification for their misfortunes, but their reasoning for scapegoating is ultimately irrational. In the second chapter of his book, “Stereotypes of Persecution”, Girard offers an explanation. As he himself claims, “they (men) are disconcerted by the immensity of the disaster but never look into

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