Free Irish Nationalism Essays and Papers

Sort By:
Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays

Free Irish Nationalism Essays and Papers

Page 1 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    several years of political organisation and agitation among the unskilled working class, carried out primarily through the Irish Transport Workers Union. The ITGWU had been founded by Larkin in 1909 specifically as a union of the unskilled, long deemed 'unorganisable' by the official trade union movement. The open militancy of the ITGWU was a new departure in the history of the Irish trade union movement and the organisation grew rapidly, from 4,000 members in 1911 to 10,000 by 1913. The ITGWU quickly

    • 1622 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Act of Union in 1800 was a significant factor to the nature of Irish nationalism in 1800. Prior to the Act, the society of the united Irishmen, a republican society who wanted parliamentary reform and Catholic Emancipation, fought, under the leadership of Robert Emmet, with physical force for their complete independence. Because of their military strand they differed from their predecessors the ‘Protestant Patriots’, this is because the society was heavily influenced by revolutionary events in

    • 1386 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Best Essays

    Ireland and Irish Nationalism in the Poetry of William Butler Yeats William Butler Yeats was an Irish poet, a dramatist, and a prose writer - one of the greatest English-language poets of the twentieth century. (Yeats 1) His early poetry and drama acquired ideas from Irish fable and arcane study. (Eiermann 1) Yeats used the themes of nationalism, freedom from oppression, social division, and unity when writing about his country. Yeats, an Irish nationalist, used the three poems, “To Ireland in

    • 1790 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 8 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Nationalism in Ireland During the Nineteenth Century After the Act of Union in 1801 the fate of the Irish people was in the hands of British M.P.s. They ruled the majority in Parliament and were making all of the decisions without much regard for the opinion from the people of Ireland. In order for the voices of the Irish people to be heard there would have to be a new nationalist approach to dealing with the British Parliament. Leaders such as Daniel O'Connell and Charles Parnell revolutionized

    • 1280 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Avancement of the Cause of Irish Catholics and Nationalist Leaders in the Years 1801 - 1921 In 1801, the Act of Union between Britain and Ireland saw the closing of Irish Parliament and was therefore routinely denounced by all manner of Irish nationalists. Much of Ireland was owned by absentee protestant ascendancy landlords, which caused a lot of bad feeling among the ordinary Irish people who worked on the land and had to pay extortionate rents for the land they worked on, often to

    • 3866 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Irish Nationalists and Ulster Unionists The question of the division of Ireland between the predominantly Protestant North and the Catholic South is a long-standing, deep seated and highly complex issue which still continues to be controversial to this day. There have been many attempts to resolve the problems in order to restore peace to this small island, however none have been found. The Irish Nationalists and the Ulster Unionists both had powerful reasons for fighting their own cause

    • 1963 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    turn brought about Nationalism who sought to protect it. These two paramilitary groups brought Ireland to the brink of civil war by 1914. When Liberals won power in 1906 they tried to keep the Irish question in the background ensuring it stayed well down the political agenda. But in 1910 things changed and the election lead to the Irish nationals holding the balance of power, this meant Liberals were only able to reduce the Lords power with the support of the Irish Nationalists but in

    • 575 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Effectiveness of Irish Catholic and Nationalist Leaders in Advancing Their Cause in the Years 1801 and On The Act Of Union in 1800 meant there was no longer any Irish institution capable of advancing either an Irish nationalist or catholic cause. As a result the advancement of those causes depended on influencing the British Government directly. The catholic cause initially focused on securing emancipation for the catholic population and aimed to improve the lives and rights of Catholics

    • 1772 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The I.R.A: Activists or Terrorists?

    • 1496 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited

    partition Ireland. The Brits would take control of the northern part of Ireland, and call it Northern Ireland. They would leave the rest of the island for the Irish. Neither side was happy about this outcome. The majority of the Irish bitterly accepted this. They felt Northern Ireland would collapse under it‘s own weight. A group of brave Irish nationalist did not stand for this, and fought tooth and nail to rise against the British.

    • 1496 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Change of the Irish Question between 1800 and 1922 The Irish Question changed dramatically between the years 1800 and 1922. The Anglican Ascendancy meant that Ireland was governed indirectly from England. The Ascendancy angered the Catholics, limited their rights and made them pay taxes to the Protestant church. This led to dissatisfaction amongst Catholics culminating in the 1798 Rebellion. This caused the British Government to become more involved with Ireland, as they began to fear

    • 1956 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
Previous
Page12345678950