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    Irish Literature and Rebellion In the heart of every Irishman hides a poet, burning with nationalistic passion for his beloved Emerald Isle. It is this same passion, which for centuries, Great Britain has attempted to snuff out of the Catholics of Ireland with tyrannical policies and the hegemony of the Protestant religion. Catholics were treated like second-class citizens in their native home. Centuries of oppression churned in the hearts of the Irish and came to a boil in the writings and literature

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    Irish mythology is a slew of history and myth, blurring the lines of understandable and reliable Irish history (Dersin, 16; Kinniburgh). This unique literature, demonstrates the Celtic peoples sense of the connection between the natural and supernatural realms (Dersin, 15). In Irish myth, the Tuatha de Danaan are the human like gods that reside in the Otherworld after being fought off by the first Irish people when they came from Spain (Dersin, 16). They are immortal beings with shape-shifting abilities

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    The Irish Potato Famine and The Holocaust in Literature Writers often use literature as a means of communicating traumatic events that occur in history, and such events are recorded by first-hand accounts as well as remembered by people far removed from the situation. Two traumatic events in history that are readily found in literature are The Irish Potato Famine and The Holocaust. A literary medium that has been used quite poignantly to convey trauma is poetry and the poetry from these two

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    prominent Irish writers of the twentieth century; his writing characterizes a broad, multifaceted range of political, social and religious anxieties shaping Ireland for the duration of its most remarkable period of change, which transformed the place from a relatively peaceful country to a more political and aggressive location. The picture Synge creates shows us that the question of identity relating to Ireland is problematic; however it has produced and provoked some of the greatest literature of the

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    post-colonial. Although colonialism, as a subject for Irish criticism and theory, has been tentatively broached (for example, see Celtic Revivals (1985) by Seamus Deane) Edward Said’s lecture “Yeats and Decolonization”, published as a pamphlet by Field Day in 1988, was an important catalyst for post-colonial study of Irish literature and culture. The premise of this now seminal study is that Yeats was a poet of decolonisation, a muse expressing the Irish experience of the dominant colonial power of Britain

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    language is a reminder that this book was written with the rich and cultured person in mind and becomes aggravating to this unenlightened one. In reading the excerpt from The Land of Spices by Kate O’Brien contained in “The Penguin Book of Irish Literature”, this reader is at once aware of the descriptive words with which Helen (the eventual Reverend Mother of the novel) depicts her father, Henry Archer. She presents him in the passage as a man who is “very beautiful…different from other men…with

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    366, I honestly never knew very much about the oppression of Ireland from England. I knew that there had always been trouble between the two countries, but I never knew of the strong feelings that have been expressed about England in many Irish works of literature. After reading works from this course I began to see Swift’s emphasis on politics, his use of gross humor and his ideas of fitting into society in both the excerpt found ... ... middle of paper ... ...ire has helped me to examine my own

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    In modern Ireland, women are having children less than they were a few decades ago. This fact is illustrated within modern Irish literature. Children are scarce in William Trevor’s Reading Turgenev and in Edna O’Brien’s Wild Decembers. Both stories follow the struggles of adult Irish relationships that aren’t complicated with the task of raising children during the time of the plot. While the children are rarely anywhere to be found, many characters act like they are children when they supposed to

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    traditions and also the broader Irish literary tradition in which it belongs. Seamus Deane refers to Ireland as a "Strange Country" and indeed O'Brien's own narrator recalls the words of his father: " . . . he would mention Parnell with the customers and say that Ireland was a queer country." (7) Such a concurrence indicates to a degree the peculiar nature of the Irish situation with regard to theoretical post-colonial models. There is a temptation to see all Irish work since the revival in

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    James Boswell

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    have had no ability. "I have long wished that the Irish literature were cultivated.2 Ireland is known by tradition to have been once the seat of piety and learning; and surely it would be very acceptable to all those who are curious either in the original of nations, or the affinities of languages, to be further informed of the revolution of a people so ancient, and once so illustrious. "What relation there is between the Welsh and Irish language, or between the language of Ireland and that

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