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    Irish Immigrants in Boston

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    Irish Immigrants in Boston The life of Irish immigrants in Boston was one of poverty and discrimination. The religiously centered culture of the Irish has along with their importance on family has allowed the Irish to prosper and persevere through times of injustice. Boston's Irish immigrant population amounted to a tenth of its population. Many after arriving could not find suitable jobs and ended up living where earlier generations had resided. This attributed to the 'invisibility' of the

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    Irish Immigrants

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    Populated by 8 million people, Irish, with a majority of Roman Catholic, are among the poorest people in the western world. Only about a quarter of the population could read and write, and their life expectancy was relatively short. Ireland was an exceedingly impoverished country. Under the english rule, citizens lost many of their political and religious rights. They were separated between protestants, who represents the continued presence of England, and Roman Catholics, who were hostile to Britain

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    Discrimination of Irish Catholic Immigrants During the 1920’s During the 1920’s there were many controversial issues.  There was a concern about declining moral and ethical values, which led to restrictions such as prohibition for example.  The concern about these issues seemed most intense when they pertained to religion.  In situations like these it always seems necessary to place the blame somewhere.  One particular group on which this blame was emphasized happened to be the immigrants.  Irish Catholic

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    Irish Catholic Immigrant

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    Being the first born daughter of an Irish Catholic family in Brooklyn, New York during 1935 was a journey from the start. Growing up on Flatbush Avenue during the 1930’s was not the same as it is today. My Nana claims that the community was very close knit and it was very rare that someone of the unfamiliar bothered anyone living in the neighborhood. As a child and teenager growing up in Brooklyn, my grandmother could not recall a time in her life that she felt threatened or endanger for her well

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    Honored Irish Immigrants

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    of a better life. For the Irish, the American dreams and promises weren’t just ideas and hopes, they were the way to a new beginning in America, a way to start over and forget the horrifying past they encountered. The Irish struggled day after day to pay for fair travel to America. To many people, the challenge the Irish overcame seemed to deserve praise. Today, the Irish are honored and commemorated for their hard work and desire for a better life. The start of the Irish’ peoples struggles began

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    that the Irish immigrants have to face in America for their first six months in the new world. Little did he know that in a couple of decades, the Irish population of America would increase almost fivefold. The story that he would tell of his immigration would be strikingly different than the stories of the nearly 700,000 refugees that would make the voyage across the Atlantic thirty years after he did. The conditions for the Irish Catholics in America would all but get better. Irish

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    Overview Of Irish Immigrants To America

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    Immigrants to America have played a major role in shaping the America that we know. These individuals have had to content with discrimination, prejudice, and a less than warm welcome. For many, it has taken generations for them to be an accepted part of our society. Two of these groups were the Irish and Jewish immigrants. These immigrants suffered hardships in their home countries, immigrated to America where they perhaps endured different hardships, but eventually, became an accepted part of our

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    notorious potato famine, many Irish were moving across the Atlantic to America in hopes of a more prosperous, uncomplicated and trouble-free lifestyle. Irish emigrants looked at America to offer a higher standard of living through high wages and low commodity costs. With the myths of an easily attainable lifestyle existing in America, it is no wonder why later; there were so many potato famine-era immigrants that they established the basis for the significant Irish population and ethnicity in the

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    Descriminationn Against Irish-American Immigrants and Native Americans Racism is a problem with roots reaching as far back as biblical times, and it is questionable as to whether or not racial discrimination will ever vanish. Many different groups of people have been subject to racism over time. Two historical examples of people who were discriminated against because of their nationality are Native Americans and Irish-American immigrants. Although the situations they faced are not quite identical

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    Successful Management of a Diverse Workforce

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    American Independence, the American workforce began seeing many German and Irish immigrants who were Roman Catholic, which increased as the nineteenth century progressed. Actually, according to Hatton and Williamson (1998), during the second half of the nineteenth century, “ the rate of Irish emigration was more than double that of any other European country, with as many as 13 per thousand emigrating each year”. While the Irish were flooding the workforce from Europe, the Chinese were also flowing into

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