Free Irish diaspora Essays and Papers

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Free Irish diaspora Essays and Papers

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    Changes in the numbers and sources of international migrants in the 19th and 20th centuries greatly altered the ethnic and social makeup of the U.S. population. Starting in the early 1800s, there were many waves of migrants with a fluctuating amount of people coming to the United States, and with each group of people America was made all the more culturally diverse. However, such a large influx of people did have adverse consequences, especially for African Americans. In 1820, almost 8,000 immigrants

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    century was the Irish Potato Famine. The Irish Potato Famine struck Ireland in 1845, leaving millions of people starving, dead, and in poverty. More than 1.5 million people left their homeland to seek refuge in the America (Costly). Discrimination against the Irish, especially by potential employers, left many immigrants jobless and in poverty even in the United States. After the harsh treatment they had endured in America, many Irishmen took up arms and joined Mexico in an Irish Brigade in the Mexican-American

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    Analysis The book, “The Irish Way” by James R. Barrett is a masterpiece written to describe the life of Irish immigrants who went to start new lives in America after conditions at home became un-accommodative. Widespread insecurity, callous English colonizers and the ghost of great famine still lingering on and on in their lives, made this ethnic group be convinced that home was longer a home anymore. They descended in United States of America in large numbers. James R. Barrett in his book notes

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    The Potato Famine

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    one of the greatest tragedies Of the nineteenth century.” -Ian Gibson Irish-American. To some, this term merely designates one of the many ethnic groups which can be found in the United States; but to those who are Irish-American, it represents a people who faced a disaster of mammoth proportions and who managed to survive at great cost. The Great Hunger of 1845 changed, or more often, destroyed the lives of millions of Irish, causing them to seek refuge from poverty and starvation in other, more

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    potato famine. This famine was a turning point in Irish history. It was the cause of the great flloods of immigrants into the United States and into England, and was the origin of the stereotype of Irish people being poverty ridden. The history of Ireland is important in understanding the famine. The conditions which turned the failure of a single crop into a national disaster were a product of a turbulent relationship between the Irish people and their English rulers (Percival 15). The

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    Racism in America

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    the struggles most races went through during the early age and today racism still exist among us because of our skin color. The Irish community was one the groups that had to deal with racism in the early the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Political and social had impact the community in different aspect in life. In American soil, the people tend to describe the Irish on different level of stereotypes based on certain characteristic, personality and trait. The people of Ireland ended in America

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    During the 19th and 20th century immigration was vastly popular among the Irish and Chinese people. They faced rough travels across the oceans, dangerous disease causing many to die while on ships and navigated through harsh landscapes. Finding ships to take them was difficult along with the ride across the oceans which resulted in many fatalities for the Irish. Once they arrived both of them were discriminated against due to their ethnicity, culture and religion. Many of these people were used because

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    The historical land of Mesopotamia significantly contributed to early civilization in relation to its close proximity to the Tigris and Euphrates rivers and rich fertile land it provided. The rivers offered the people of Mesopotamia fertile soil, irrigation water for crops and fishing, and also supplied an abundance of wild barley and wheat for food or could stored as a food supply. The first settlers of Mesopotamia learned to cultivate and harvest crops, which would provide a bountiful supply for

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    Irish Immigrants

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    Populated by 8 million people, Irish, with a majority of Roman Catholic, are among the poorest people in the western world. Only about a quarter of the population could read and write, and their life expectancy was relatively short. Ireland was an exceedingly impoverished country. Under the english rule, citizens lost many of their political and religious rights. They were separated between protestants, who represents the continued presence of England, and Roman Catholics, who were hostile to Britain

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    During the 1800's, the Irish population relied heavily on the farming and eating of potatoes grown on land that was not owned by them. The land they cultivated and grew their crops on was owned by strangers. In 1845, a catastrophic blight struck potato crops all over Ireland. The sudden wilting of all potato crops lasted five years and brought about starvation, disease, and death. This also brought massive immigration to North America. These immigrants from Ireland came not only to Ellis Island

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