Free Irish Essays and Papers

Sort By:
Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays

Free Irish Essays and Papers

Page 1 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Irish

    • 1797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited

    famine, despair, and hardship. Throughout the years the Irish have come from the lowest of lows to the highest of highs. In this paper I will give a history of the Irish people before coming to America, what it was coming here, how they were welcomed to their new home, and how they are faring now. I will also expose many of the stereotypes that the Irish have pinned to them and the reason that they are there. In the early 1800's, the Irish had great success in the potato industry due to the high

    • 1797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    irish patato famine

    • 1477 Words
    • 3 Pages

    in the 1500’s was a very unstable country. The country’s English rulers fought with the local Irish civilians and the Irish nobles. The Irish nobles also fought among themselves. The English landlords owned the land that the peasants lived and farmed on. As a result of this continual fighting, it was hard for the peasants to grow enough food to feed themselves. The British passed laws to deny the Irish peasants freedom. They were forbidden to speak their own language, to practice their own religion

    • 1477 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Irish History

    • 876 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Sources: 1.) Whelan, Kevin. The Tree of Liberty: Radicalism, Catholicism, and the Construction of Irish Identity. 1760-1830. United States: University of Notre Dame Press, 1996. Irish History Tree of Liberty Paper The Protestant Landowners in the 1690’s grew tired of attempting to collect taxes from a relatively poor Irish population. Middlemen were therefore appointed to manage the lands, collect taxes, and ensure profitability. The owners of the lands may have been Protestant but the workers

    • 876 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Irish Stereotypes

    • 517 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The Irish people have been on the receiving end of many racial stereotypes. When they migrated to America because of lack of jobs, poor living conditions, and many other reasons they were treated as the lowest member of the social class. They were given jobs that were thought to be too unsafe for blacks to carry out because the loss of a slave was an out of pocket expense (Kinsella, 2002). But The Irish were not only discriminated against in America, but in their own country as well, and England

    • 517 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Irish Campaign in America

    • 1826 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited

    Early Modern Scotland Darien Company: A Necessary Disaster? The 1690s were a time of much unrest in Scotland. The Glencoe massacre had served to discredit the monarch somewhat. Recent crop failures had led to a famine which was affecting much of the country. There was also a serious downturn in Scottish trade which greatly affected the economy. In the aftermath of this came the Darien Expedition. The Darien Scheme, as it is commonly referred to today, is one of the greatest failures in Scottish

    • 1826 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Irish Stereotypes

    • 1787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited

    since time has passed the Irish stereotypes were made are developing and have become well-known. Most stereotypes are made through misguided interpretations or assumptions of people and in this case that is what majority of the Irish stereotypes follow. Many of these stereotypes of the Irish give them a label that all Irish people are the same. The media hasn’t helped these assumptions that are put on the Irish and these misguided ideas which end up spreading the Irish stereotypes causing them to

    • 1787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    several years of political organisation and agitation among the unskilled working class, carried out primarily through the Irish Transport Workers Union. The ITGWU had been founded by Larkin in 1909 specifically as a union of the unskilled, long deemed 'unorganisable' by the official trade union movement. The open militancy of the ITGWU was a new departure in the history of the Irish trade union movement and the organisation grew rapidly, from 4,000 members in 1911 to 10,000 by 1913. The ITGWU quickly

    • 1622 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Irish Literature and Rebellion In the heart of every Irishman hides a poet, burning with nationalistic passion for his beloved Emerald Isle. It is this same passion, which for centuries, Great Britain has attempted to snuff out of the Catholics of Ireland with tyrannical policies and the hegemony of the Protestant religion. Catholics were treated like second-class citizens in their native home. Centuries of oppression churned in the hearts of the Irish and came to a boil in the writings and literature

    • 1454 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Irish Essay

    • 1115 Words
    • 3 Pages

    During the 18th and 19th centuries, the Irish rapidly flowed into the United States. The Irish immigrated in different waves and for various reasons, only to be greeted with significant barriers when landing in America. The Irish were essentially pushed out of Ireland because of the awful economy and the great potato famine. Upon arriving in the United States, the Irish had a difficult time with jobs, discrimination, housing, and money in the populated urban cities in which they settled. Having

    • 1115 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Influence Of Chinese And Irish

    • 2138 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited

    The Influence of Chinese and Irish Laborers on the Transcontinental Railroad The Chinese and Irish laborers answered strongly when asked to help build the Transcontinental Railroad that connected the Pacific and the Atlantic Coasts. During the long process the immigrant workers encountered harsh weather and living and working conditions. Their work produced the Great Iron Trail in an incredibly short time with minimal resources and equipment. Their struggles are often overlooked and their overseers

    • 2138 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
Previous
Page12345678950