Free Internet censorship in the People's Republic of China Essays and Papers

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    This is where internet censorship steps in. Although censoring some sites is reasonable, some are not. If a site on the internet criticizes the government and if this happens in a country where the government is somewhat oppressive, the site is blocked to access. I believe the level of tolerance towards criticism of a government can be found by the internet censorship in that country. We can categorize these types of governments into five: No or few censorship, normal amounts of censorship, above normal

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    Internet Censorship and China

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    The Politics of Censorship – Bryan Thetford Such an enormous investment is, out of necessity, coupled with legislation and bureaucracy. In 2010 the People's Republic of China released a white-paper via their Information Office detailing its policies for implementing and regulating the Internet (Xu). Delegating control to over a dozen government organizations and detailing 18 specific laws or decisions regarding China's Internet, the document is nothing if not thorough (Dance to The Revolution). Despite

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    Internet Use in China

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    media, Internet included, despite the fact that the government applies strict rules of control and censorship, which is against the nature itself of Internet. In order to deliver a better idea of how media work in China today, is necessary to remind where the People's Republic of China is from and what is the approach to media generally, that helps to understand the contrast based on the different ideologies behind Internet and Chinese government relating to media. When the People's Republic was founded

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    Universal Human Rights?

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    Throughout the years, the People’s Republic of China (hereinafter, the PRC) has remained notorious for its explicit defiance of international human right norms. These norms, codified in the United Nation’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights (hereinafter, the UDHR), define human rights to be “inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family” (The Universal Declaration). While this declaration seeks to cement a set of universal human rights in the international

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    Censorship and Information Privacy Policies in Eastern Asia and the United States of America Introduction Fifteen or twenty years ago, no one would have been able to predict the magnitude of the impact that the evolution of computer internetworking technologies has had on the world. The advancement of computers and networking technologies, as well as the constant flow of new innovations has forever changed the way the human race communicates. People across the globe have been given a medium

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    Censorship Laws and Practices in China

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    Censorship Laws and Practices in China Introduction China joined the global Internet age in 1994, and has been commercially available since 1995. Since then, Chinese Internet usage has seen explosive growth, doubling every six months, and the number of online users is only second to the US. The Internet age ushered in the information age with a new world of freedom and expression for the Chinese. However, soon after its inception, the Chinese government has reined in the free wheeling Internet

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    Censorship in the Media

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    Is Censorship necessary? “Once a government is committed to the principle of silencing the voice of opposition, it has only one way to go, and that is down the path of increasingly repressive measures, until it becomes a source of terror to all its citizens and creates a country where everyone lives in fear." -- Harry S Truman Thesis: Although some people believe that censorship is adequate to select what things does the society will be good and can live around it while others believe that there

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    Media Control and Censorship

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    Essay: Media Control and Censorship Censorship is the suppression of media or public communication deemed disagreeable or even dangerous, by the government or some sort of group in control. Even though the freedom of speech, opinion, information and press are considered individual human rights and are rooted in democratic ideology, media censorship is not uncommon in the world, and has been popular with authoritarian regimes such as the Soviet Union. However, how has censorship changed from the Soviet

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    Chinese Government The Chinese government abuses the legal process and ignores many fundamental human rights of its citizens. This is evidenced by the underrepresentation of women by their government, citizens’ religious lives being controlled, and censorship of freedom of speech granted to their citizens in their constitution. The Chinese government restricts the human rights of its citizens to protect their image from being damaged. Female activists face unlawful detainment by China’s police force

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    Google and China

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    Google made a deal with the People’s Republic of China to launch Google.cn, a modified version of the American Google search engine. Because of Chinese censorship laws, Google was required to become an Internet service provider in China, as well as censor search results in order to remove any results that are considered illegal in China (Wilson). This means that Google was implying that the vision for their company could comply with the self-censorship laws in China, however, being an American company

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    Censorship: An Obstacle for True Democracy

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    Censorship has been used by governments and influential groups throughout history as a tool for political and economic gain since ancient times. The Romans thought censorship was necessary to shape the morals of society to match up with government ideals. During the 1500's the Catholic Church banned certain texts that conflicted with the established religion from being read. In these times the idea of censorship was viewed differently that it is today. With powerful organizations limiting information

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    The Futility of Web Censorship

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    Proof Firewall News Item: Moses, A (2009,02,26). Web censorship plan heads towards a dead end. Brisbane Times, Retrieved 2009,03,02, from http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/news/technology/web-censorship-plan-heads-towards-a-dead-end/2009/02/26/1235237821636.html A. Presentation of the Issue In December 2007, the Australian government revealed plans to initiate an Australia wide filter for illegal and ‘questionable’ content on the Internet (ABC, 2007). Said plans were met with thunderous opposition

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    offense in the United States, is not illegal in China (Internet, 2010). Every country has its own way to deal with threats against its information systems. Some have been working for years to strengthen their defenses against attack through legislation and law enforcement while others are just beginning to address the problem. The United States began passing heavy legislation after the September 11 attacks in order to augment existing laws. China, on the other hand, has only recently begun to expand

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    China's Golden Shield Project

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    The Golden Shield Project, colloquially known as the “Great Firewall of China”, is the Chinese government’s Internet surveillance and censorship campaign. OpenNet Initiative, a professional collaboration between the Cambridge Security Program, University of Toronto Citizen Lab, and Harvard Law School, declared the Firewall to be the most sophisticated content-filtering intranet regime in the world (Punyakumpol). The Ministry of Public Security, China’s principle security authority, initiated, developed

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    The People's Republic of China has commonly been regarded as a nation that has censored its media very heavily and has enforced this harshly. China is the largest country in the world, and also has the one of the fastest expanding media. Additionally, China has been enjoying explosive pecuniary expansion for the better part of the last few decades and as a consequence, the living standards of most Chinese citizens has increased drastically in modern times due to growing wealth of the general population

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    Amuru Serikyaku Professor Conteh-Morgan INR 4931 5 April 2013 The Triangular Relationship: The PRC’s Domestic Security Apparatus, Human Rights Organizations, and Sino-American Relations On June 4th 1989, the People’s Republic of China shocked the world when Deng Xiaoping, then the “paramount leader” of the CCP-controlled state, ordered the massacre of thousands of protesters demonstrating for greater freedoms in Tiananmen Square. Deng Xiaoping and Premier of the State Council, Li Peng, defended the

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    such states in the world today. Some hide behind the veil of a democratic government and others are in plain sight as communist, socialist, fascist, or totalitarianism regime. The World Factbook: China, Central Intelligence Agency of the United States of America, lists The People’s Republic of China (PRC) as a communist state (cia.gov). The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has ruled with an iron fist for many years. Is the PRC, controlled by the CCP, a tyrannical political state? The comparative

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    Internet Censorship: Censoring Freedom

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    matter of seconds. Ever since the internet was first made publically available in 1991 the ease of accessing entertainment, education, and information has been increasing every year. We now live in an age where roughly 30% of all people in the entire world are connected to the web ("World Internet Usage Statistics New and World Population Stats"). However, despite the obvious advantages of the internet’s freedom, some countries are trying to control the internet and display what it deems appropriate

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    Internet Censorship- Research Paper By Lyle Tamlyn (43669182) Throughout the world there has been an increase in discussions regarding “Censorship of the Internet”, explain how Censorship can work in some instances but in others it can be a detriment to society. According to Amnesty International (2014), internet censorship is the control and suppression of online information or services by government or other stakeholder institutions. It is enforced by monitoring chat rooms and forums, deleting

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    The introduction of the Internet to the mainstream world has brought with it a new way of distributing information. This new distribution of information over the Internet has created a power struggle between some states and their citizens. The basic definition of power is the action of a person over another person to force the submissive person to do something he would not ordinarily do. Brian A. Connery, a professor at Oakland University who has studied power, defines power as, "Any capacity

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