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Free Insane Asylums Essays and Papers

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    Nineteenth Century Insane Asylums

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    Nineteenth Century Insane Asylums No matter where they were, mad houses, or insane asylums, have the same basic features and functions. The views of asylum life changed drastically over the course of the nineteenth century. The growth of the number of mad houses during the nineteenth century is quite remarkable. Before 1810, only a few states had insane asylums. By 1850, most of the Northeastern and Midwestern states' legislatures supported having asylums. As early as 1860, 23 of the 33 existing

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    Insane Asylums

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    The Tales of Mental Asylums in Pennsylvania Once upon a time, long ago in the mists of time, sprawling brick structures housed countless individuals with mental disturbances. These massive structures were known to the world as mental asylums for the insane. In reality, the majorities of these individuals were not insane, but in contrast were suffering from mild mental problems such as depression or anxiety. These people were looked down upon in society and were labeled as "freaks" or "batty" because

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    Asylum Victims The main purpose of an insane asylum or mental hospital was to care for and provide treatment to the mentally ill. In the late 1800’s to early 1900’s this was not the case. Not only were the mentally ill forced to go into these institutions, but perfectly healthy people were admitted as well. Many of the perfectly healthy individuals, unfairly admitted, were women (Jean-Charles). These healthy women were placed in insane asylums simply because they were not an “obedient housewife

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    The History of Insane Asylums

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    hear the words “insane asylum”? Do such terms as lunatic, crazy, scary, or even haunted come to mind? More than likely these are the terminology that most of us would use to describe our perception of insane asylums. However, those in history that had a heart’s desire to treat the mentally ill compassionately and humanely had a different viewpoint. Insane asylums were known for their horrendous treatment of the mentally ill, but the ultimate purpose in the reformation of insane asylums in the nineteenth

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    Poe

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    realize that the narrator is nothing other than insane. Although the narrator is insane, he committed a grotesque murder and should pay for what he did. In a case like this, although the person is insane, you want to give them a cruel and unjust sentence, like the cruel and unjust murder they committed. Criminals and insane people are both a threat to themselves and society but in different ways, which is why there is jail for criminals and insane asylums for psychopaths. The Tell-Tale Heart illustrates

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    History and Overview of Insane Asylums

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    decades the mentally ill or insane have been hated, shunned, and discriminated against by the world. They have been thrown into cruel facilities, said to help cure their mental illnesses, where they were tortured, treated unfairly, and given belittling names such as retards, insane, demons, and psychos. However, reformers such as Dorothea Dix thought differently of these people and sought to help them instead. She saw the inhumanity in these facilities known as insane asylums or mental institutions,

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    Davis was insane. She has lived in an insane asylum since she was 21. She had disappeared for one year and magically appeared two months pregnant and muttering about dragons, talking monkeys, and forces. I’m Josh Davis her son. When she went to the asylum nobody knew she was pregnant so I was born in the asylum. I never met my father. My mom never talks about him and the blood test didn’t come back. Because I live with my mother’s parents, they spoil me probably thinking I would go insane as well

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    19th century during industrialization. The Western countries saw an immense increase in the number and size of insane asylums, during what was known as “the great confinement” or the “asylum era” (Torrey, Stieber, Ezekiel, Wolfe, Sharfstein, Noble, Flynn Criminalizing the Seriously Mentally Ill). Laws were starting to be made to pressure authorities to face the people who were deemed insane by family members and hospital administrators. Because of the overpopulation in the institutions, treatment became

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    Foucault and Erving Goffman, together they give a delineation of the discourse of madness. This essay delves into both of these renowned sociologists, in an attempt to explore both Michel Foucault’s finding on the treatment of the insane and Erving Goffman’s work on asylums. It begins with a very deep and archival aspect on Foucault’s part; where close attention was paid to the evolution of language, words and the view of the mad. Foucault studied and researched in a more genealogical and archeological

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    perception, and rights than what they have now. There have been laws put in place in order to let the mentally disabled have more rights to their treatment and education. One psychiatric institution that dehumanized its patients was the Pennhurst Insane Asylum. According to Emily Smith Beitiks (2012), “3,500 patients were living in Pennhurst with only 600 workers to assist them.” With this low amount of workers it was very hard for patients to get the treatment they deserved.

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