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    Influenza Vaccines

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    Influenza is an infectious illness that can be spread from one individual to the next. It can be transmitted by means of saliva, nasal secretions, feces and blood. It can also be spread by coming in contact with the virus on contaminated surfaces. Influenza is responsible for an average of 36,000 deaths and for more than 226,000 hospitalizations each year in the United States. (Davidson, 2007-2009, Davis, 2007). It is my goal for this paper to explain how flu vaccines are made, how long it takes

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    Influenza Vaccines

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    the globe affecting thousands of people is the influenza virus and the different strains that recently evolved. Influenza viruses are said to be pathogenic and can be highly contagious when not properly treated immediately (Pfleiderer et al, 2014). This deadly virus has affected countless regions or areas throughout the earth for hundreds of years. Over the span of years, researchers have been studying and reproducing various new influenza vaccines due to the high rates of mortality and disease caused

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    Influenza Vaccines

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    Influenza is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality every year, although Influenza Vaccines (i.e., flu shots) is a effective way to decrease the chance of morbidity and mortality caused by influenza. Therefore, it is important to know the reason for non-vaccination, and find the methods to increase the coverage rate of vaccination in population. A resent study done by Chinese researchers indicates a low vaccination rate, which is just 16.7%, in year 2010/2011 of Beijing, and the same

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    Influenza Vaccine

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    what is the benefit of treating influenza with oseltamivir outside the current dosing recommendations, including starting treatment after 48 hours of symptom onset, extending treatment duration beyond five days, or doubling the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved dose? Background: In the United States, influenza season generally starts in October, peaks during winter months around January and February, and concludes by April or May. Because each influenza season varies in length and severity

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    The vaccine that was chosen for this report is the influenza vaccine. Influenza, also called the flu, is an acute viral infection of the upper or lower respiratory tract. (The Editors of Encyclopedia Britannica) This specific topic was chosen due to the fact that the influenza virus, or the flu virus, is such a well known and common illness. The flu affects people all across the world on a daily basis because it is very hard to fight. The illness has many different forms which causes problems for

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    Influenza Vaccines Essay

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    The Influenza Vaccine Vaccines save us from being infected with viruses. They save approximately 2.5 million people from death every year. However, while they help save lives, vaccines still have both minor and severe side effects. This can result in nausea, severe sickness, and in rare cases, death. Every year, 3,000 to 4,500 people in the United States are hospitalized due to vaccine side effects. It is extremely important for all communities to be informed about the side effects of vaccines and

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    “Have you received your flu vaccine yet?” Indeed, this question is very familiar to many, and rightfully so―influenza, a dangerous illness that has been present since the first recorded flu pandemic in 1580 (http://www.foxnews.com/story/2005/11/02/timeline-avian-and-pandemic-influenza/), has been the cause for billions of deaths throughout history. However, there is a reason that the common question “have you received your flu vaccine yet?” is so well known. Vaccines have been extraordinarily helpful

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    The Importance of the Influenza Vaccine

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    humans have developed ways to cure themselves, beginning with simple herbs and proceeding as far as vaccines and complex medicines. One cure that long eluded scientists was that of the influenza virus. Now, the influenza vaccine, or flu shot, saves thousands of lives a year and helps prevent serious complications resulting from influenza infection. At no time was a search for the cure for influenza more frantic than after the devastating effects of the pandemic of 1918. The pandemic killed somewhere

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    The Influenza Vaccine: Today and Tomorrow

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    the preventive. This preventive is called the influenza vaccine. The vaccine used all over the world to prevent the flu. There are many misconceptions in the advertisement of the flu vaccine though. No one quite knows how the vaccine works to prevent the virus. The world also has a skewed vision of the side effects involving the vaccine. When given the influenza vaccine there is a fifty percent chance of getting the flu. On the contrary, the vaccine has helped many to survive and live long, healthy

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    2004 Influenza Vaccine Shortage Internal PR Action Plan MKT 438 November, 22, 2004 Abstract This year’s flu season is supposed to bring a strain of the virus with a severity unlike any other seen in previous years. This supposed new strain is a mutated, currently untreatable strain that is expected to be responsible for several deaths. The media has caused such a wide spread panic over the Influenza bug this year and then claimed that 48 million vaccines mysteriously became contaminated

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    flu from ever occurring. Development of a vaccine began soon after the first strain of influenza was isolated in 1933. Observations were conducted using formalin inactivated whole virus preparations. They discovered that inoculating an individual with an inactivated form of the virus would introduce the antigens to the body causing it to produce a certain immune response. In 1938, Jonas Salk and Thomas Francis developed the first vaccine for the influenza virus. Today, a very similar approach is

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    Influenza Vaccine Safety

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    Influenza Vaccine Safety in Children Ayodeji Elujosi and Faith Adodo Chamberlain College of Nursing NR 103: Transition to the Nursing Profession Fall 2016 Influenza Vaccine in Children According to Ballard (2014) “patient safety is an essential and vital component of quality nursing care.” Nonetheless, errors abound everywhere and healthcare system is not an exception. These errors can be deleterious to safe patient care, due to defects of the systems. Different ally like the general public

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    During the frigid winter months, the flu takes ahold of the entire country, constraining it in a cough-ridden, congested grasp until taking its leave in the warm months of spring. Several strains of the influenza virus compose collectively of the flu, and these strains mutate — or alter their genetic composition — as the virus creeps into and out of the people and animals it infects. Throughout the year, researchers and doctors scramble to find the most effective prevention for the evasive flu so

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    the organisms that could possibly cause disease. On the other hand, Vaccines are also very important to us. They can literally stimulate someone’s immune system by producing immunity to a specific disease which will prevent you from being infected. In fact according to research, vaccines have decreased the number of infections from preventable diseases by more than ninety percent. The brilliant man behind the invention of vaccines goes by the name of Edward Jenner. The country doctor living in England

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    In 2005 the CDC conducted a survey. This survey stated that eighty-million influenza vaccine doses were given out in the United States. In about 2011, another survey was taken. This result said that the number of doses peaked to about one hundred and sixty million doses. In 2016 this rate has dropped down to one hundred and forty five million doses (CDC). This statistic seems to be dropping every year. This could cause several issues to people in the United States as the years progress. Vaccinations

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    According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, "there are over 200,000 hospitalizations from influenza on average every year. An average of 36,000 Americans die annually due to influenza and its complications – most are people 65 years of age and over. Additionally, there are over 40,000 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease in the U.S. and approximately one-third of these cases occur in people 65 and older. Over half of the more than 5,000 annual deaths from invasive pneumococcal

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    really expected there to be that many prescriptions going through a pharmacy in my small hometown. Mrs. Becks also administered several influenza vaccinations to patients. She told me that once you have been giving vaccines long enough that it is very simple, but did not like it at first. I would have thought it did not take a lot for a pharmacist to give flu vaccines, but sometimes it interrupts the flow of work they had been doing prior to that. In a community pharmacy, there is one pharmacist on

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    Influenza Virus

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    Influenza is one of the viruses that spread very fast and impacts a lot of people around the globe. At any given year, 20% of the population in the United States is expected to develop influenza pandemic (Palese and García-Sastre, 2002). In the US alone, there are more than 30,000 deaths a year just from influenza (Yang et al., 2013). Influenza virus is from the family Orthomyxoviridae with two main strains: Influenza A and B are the most common once to cause disease in human and they can be both

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    A Critique of the Flu.gov Web Page

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    the Emergency Department the flu season seems is an incredibly busy time of year. Hospitals are faced with numerous people coming in with complaints of fever, body aches, nausea and vomiting, and the like. According to Thomas & Ademolu (2014), the influenza virus is responsible for 200,000 hospitalizations and 23,000 deaths in the United States per year. With this virus affecting so many patients it is imperative that there be adequate resources available to manage this disease. The following is an

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    Quarantines In Canada

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    50 000 Canadians in a single year, the Spanish Influenza is considered to be one of the most fatal pandemics in Canadian history. In 1918, quarantines were not a new concept, but the quality and quantity of quarantines changed impressively during the fight against the Spanish flu. Unlike quarantines, vaccines were a completely new phenomenon; prior to the flu epidemic, there was almost no history of vaccines in Canada. However, quarantines and vaccines were not the only measures Canadians took to prevent

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