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    Imprisonment in A Doll’ s House In a Doll’ s House, a certain number of imprisonment effects are at hand. Characters such as Nora or Kristine, are condemned either by poverty or by the situation or even by the role that women were expected to play and accept in this very conventional society, regardless of the fact that they were, despite this, respected and considered as the “pillars'; of society. In the play “A Doll’s house';, all the main characters are imprisoned

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    Imprisonment and Persecution of Quakers

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    Imprisonment and Persecution of Quakers In An Account of the Travels Sufferings and Persecutions of Barbara Blaugdone, Blaugdone describes her experiences as a traveling Quaker minister, most often those of persecution and imprisonment. Imprisonment was not an uncommon occurrence for Quakers, as Blaugdone exemplifies. Traveling from town to town, Blaugdone notes, “I had Prison in all those Places” (12). Although the Quaker ideal of denouncing the clergy was not necessarily uncommon, the Quakers

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    The Theme of Imprisonment in Great Expectations The renowned poet, Richard Lovelace, once wrote that "Stone walls do not a prison make, nor iron bars a cage." Although many think of a prison as a physical building or a jailhouse, it can also be a state of mind. A great number of people are imprisoned mentally and emotionally. Charles Dickens expresses this message in his eminent novel, Great Expectations. This book is about a simple laboring boy who grew into a gentleman, and slowly realized

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    Imprisonment in Shakespeare's King Lear

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    Imprisonment in King Lear In the play King Lear, by William Shakespeare, the idea of imprisonment is fundamental to the plot and central ideas. All characters are imprisoned, whether it is physically, socially or psychologically. Each character suffers 'imprisonment' in some form. King Lear is one of the more caged characters of the play, he suffers both social and psychological incarceration and this is one the chief reasons for his descent into mental hell and inevitable downfall. Lear

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    Crime and Imprisonment in Great Expectations

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    Crime and Imprisonment in Great Expectations There is a clear relationship between the characters in Great Expectations and crime. Dickens uses this connection to show that a criminal can be reformed. He also shows the characters to be prisoners of their own doing. Pip is born into his prison. He continuously associates himself with criminals and criminal behavior. Pip likens himself to a criminal from the start: "I think my sister must have had some general idea that I was a young

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    Imprisonment of Women Exposed in The Yellow Wallpaper When asked the question of why she chose to write 'The Yellow Wallpaper', Charlotte Perkins Gilman claimed that experiences in her own life dealing with a nervous condition, then termed 'melancholia', had prompted her to write the short story as a means to try and save other people from a similar fate. Although she may have suffered from a similar condition to the narrator of her illuminating short story, Gilman's story cannot be coined merely

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    Imprisonment in Yellow Wallpaper, Jane Eyre and Slave Girl When I think of prisons, the first thing that comes into my mind is of course locking someone up against their will or as a punishment, because someone else has decided that this is for the best or simply wants to get someone out of the way. Bertha Mason in Jane Eyre is locked up in the attic and the woman in The Yellow Wall-paper is confined to a summer home by her husband. For both these women, the locking up serves as yet another

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    Contemporary Imprisonment

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    The most pressing problem for the prison system could be seen to be suicide. According to the World Health Organization (2000) suicide is often the single most common cause of death in correctional settings. Both jails and prisons are responsible for protecting the health and safety of their inmate populations. The failure to do so can be open to legal challenge. Based on this the World Health Organisation (2000) also states that it can be further fuelled by media interest, a suicide in correctional

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    Imprisonment! Who would like to be imprisoned, especially for so long? Just the name Imprisonment has been so powerful that it brings shame and emotional stress to individual, family and society. The same applies to mental illness. According to USA TODAY in “Cost of not caring: Stigma set in stone,” health care policy has made mental illness a shameful disease by limiting health care coverage that psychiatric patients get. Though imprisonment is outrageous, there is nothing wrong with incarcerating

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    Criticism by Imprisonment

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    throughout the novel, as she is seen as a slave by the upper class. Wharton’s criticism lies in Lily’s character - she is genuine, living in a world of falsities. However, Lily cannot escape because she was raised to live in the fallacious society. This imprisonment in a caustic world for a substantive prisoner is the force that drives Lily to her death, Wharton’s depiction of the fate of those who cannot achieve the accepted. In This Side of Paradise, Amory reflects on the new students at Princeton in the

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