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    Utopia - The Impossibility of Perfection

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    Utopia - The Impossibility of Perfection "The latter end of [this] commonwealth forgets the beginning." ?William Shakespeare, The Tempest From Plato's The Republic to Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, the search for a perfect social state has never stopped; its ultimate goal of achieving a human society that exists in absolute harmony with all due social justice, however, has proved to be woefully elusive. The pure concept of a utopia can be theoretically visualized as a perfect geometric

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    Candide: The Impossibility Of The Happy Life This paper's focus is Voltaire's view of human happiness.  Specifically, it will argue that Voltaire, in Candide, says that human happiness is impossible. Voltaire believes this for three reasons. First, Voltaire presents mankind in the novel spending all its life worried about personal problems of the moment. When people in Candide have no problems, Voltaire indicates, they do not feel happy but become bored instead. Their emotional lives swing between

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    Cultural Diversity and the Impossibility of a True Melting Pot The core standards of America are founded, in principle, on the basis of its diversity and equality among citizens. Begin- ning with its Declaration of Independence, the United States distinguished itself from other modern nation-states by establishing a country of men who were different but equal. Yet, despite the unifying images America projects within and beyond its borders, the idea behind E Pluribus Unum does not resound as

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    Austin's Ditch: The Political Necessity and Impossibility of "Non-Serious" Speech ABSTRACT: This essay seeks to show that there are political implications in Jacques Derrida’s critique of J.L. Austin’s notion of performative speech. If, as Derrida claims and Austin denies, performative utterances are necessarily "contaminated" by that which Austin refuses to consider (the speech of the poet and the actor in which literal force is never intended), then what are the implications for the speech

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    Isabel Allende and Kiss of the Spiderwoman by Manuel Puig, however, the characters Alba and Molina, respectively, create paradoxes through their subversive actions. These paradoxes create conflicts in self-interest, which, in turn, reveal the impossibility of actually knowing or understanding one’s true motives. In Allende’s The House of the Spirits, the character Alba displays subversive tendencies around her progression into adulthood. For example, Alba joins the revolution at age 18, mostly because

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    Rocketry

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    Rocketry, the use of rocket power as a propulsion mechanism, has changed the boundaries of man’s domain.Before the advent of efficient rocket power, space flight was seen as an impossibility and exclusively the subject of science fiction stories.The nature of rocket power changed in the early twentieth century when a man named Robert Hutchings Goddard focused his research and his entire life on efficient rocket propulsion.Rocket power had been thought of long before Goddard’s time, but he was the

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    others, a drawn-out ordeal with annoying aspects, but one they realize will be completed shortly. Yet to some, to a select, elite group of young, paranoid, and, let’s face it, broke, lot of people known as college students, it’s a travesty. An impossibility. An object traveling deep into the Void, never to be seen again. This trip into the parallel universe to which some objects traverse without return is known as: The Loss of a Package Sent by your Parents. It wasn’t a package of cookies --

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    Commentary on Alphonso Lingis’s article, “The World as a Whole” Martin Heidegger’s work in Being and Time elucidated a phenomenological ontology in which death and anxiety function as the imminent possibility of impossibility, circumscribing Dasein and inscribing weight to Dasein’s temporal existence. He constructs an individual whose ontological whole is made of three fundamental elements that function as a whole; understanding, feeling and action. This being, Dasein (translated as Being There)

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    he chose to write his “Asian Saga” series of novels. Exposing the customs and culture of the ancient Orient is a daunting task for even the most qualified professional. However, to do so with an intriguing and entertaining medium is verging on impossibility. Until the last two centuries, both China and Japan remained time capsules that held within them unique societies based on radically different values and perspectives. This national seclusion in China and Japan was a direct result of the countries’

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    An Analysis of George Bataille's The Story of the Eye ...awareness of the impossibility opens consciousness to all that is possible for it to think. In this gathering place, where violence is rife, at the boundary of that which escapes cohesion, he who reflects within cohesion realizes that there is no longer any room for him (Theory of Religion 10). When Georges Bataille first published The Story of the Eye in 1928, anonymously and "in a limited edition of 134 copies" (Lechte 118), he had

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    The Impossible World of M. C. Escher

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    Cornelis Escher, his impossible perspectives and impossible geometries, and then into the mathematics behind creating these objects. The works of Escher demonstrate this fascination. He creates worlds that are alien to our own that, despite their impossibility, contain a certain life to them. Each part of the portrait demands close attention. M. C. Escher was a Dutch graphic artist. He lived from 1902 until 1972. He produced prints in Italy in the 1920’s, but had earned very little. After leaving

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    a paper

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    Response Paper #1 The reading materials in Week 6 explore the impact of international law on states, and more specifically, state behaviors. The idea is not to oversimplify the influence of international law but to understand in what circumstances (under various theories) would the legal framework and rules of international society shape and limit the behavior of nations and their alternatives. And these include many scenarios that constitute a change in state behavior – such as abstaining from

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    Nine Stories

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    Muriel can not provide. Seymour^s relationship with Sybil is making up for Muriel^s shortcomings. Seymour is looking for the understanding of a child and the love of an adult. He wants someone who will not judge him. He rea! lizes the impossibility of his desires with Sybil when he gets a loud reaction from her after kissing the arch of her foot. Seymour has no one who understands him, which causes his feeling of isolation. He can no longer relate to the world he lives in and with no

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    English Commentary

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    the miracle that Kien awaits is to find that the past still exists "untouched" and "untainted". Of course that miracle is impossible and consequently the paragraph has a deep nostalgic sadness. Like Kien, we can feel the painful irony of the impossibility of this miracle to happen. Other images function in the same way to show Kien's despair and loss of hope. He saw "a river stretching before him. He saw himself floating towards his death". Here the narrator compares the river to a path that

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    how peace can weaken or inspire during a mental war. Phineas, a natural rebel, is known as the best athlete in school. For example, he and three others come to look at a tree, which is considered among the Upper Middler students at Devon an impossibility. Phineas demonstrates his supreme power by stating that the tree is, indeed, a "cinch" (p. 6). No Upper Middler had dared to do the unthinkable, vaulting off a tree to land in a shallow river. Phineas is the first to do this. This single statement

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    Evolution Vs Creation

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    evolutionary process, and how evolutionists answer them. The Overwhelming Odds against Spontaneous Generation Perhaps the most common scientific argument against the evolutionary theory used by creationists is the mathematical impossibility for the occurrence of successful changes in the DNA that actually results in a development of a new or modified species. What are the chances of evolving the DNA molecule - crucial to all life - by natural processes? Without an outside controlling

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    Hammond has a strong temper. On page 102, Mrs. Hammond has a dialogue with the grocer. The grocer is trying to collect money for the food that Mrs. Hammond has received from his grocery. "I don't believe it," cried Mrs. Hammond, "for it is an impossibility that my family could have consumed articles to this amount." (Page 102) Mrs. Hammond speaks harshly toward this grocer for doing his job. "Charles, who knew that the slightest liberty taken by a person not altogether agreeable to her, was sometimes

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    relationship, but rather stay as two good friends, Joe’s values of honesty and hard work are not communicated to Pip. However, the failure of Joe’s values to be communicated to Pip, do not reflect poorly on Pip, but rather, show the impossibility to expect that that should happen. Joe does not adopt a role as father for Pip. We see Joe’s reluctance to accept this role one night when a group was “assembled round the fire at the Three Jolly Bargemen'; (133). When Jaggers comes

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    many of the works of literature in this body of information are "unrealistic," and they feel they are "fake" and unimportant to them. The schools also often ask instructors to ignore their students' cultures and social circumstances. This is an impossibility. Donald Thomas states this nicely when he writes: "We bequeath to words what we cannot ourselves decipher from the rush of daily being. Words are juxtaposed to the world just as we are" (2). Simply put, culture and language are interconnected.

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    War and Peace and Tolstoy's View of History

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    ultimate purpose is beyond our comprehension.  All that is accessible to man is the relation of life to the bee to other manifestations of life.  And so it is with the purpose of historical characters and nations. This presupposition of the impossibility of a total, ultimate view of history helps to explain why Tolstoy, in his view of human actio... ... middle of paper ... ...rriere, Tolstoy's Pierre Bezukhov - A Psychoanalytical Study, Melksham: Bristol Classical Press, 1993. Helen Edna

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