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    Illegal Immigrants: Immigration Reform, Citizenship and Deportation Introduction The United States has seen a gradual increase in the number of illegal immigrants who cross its borders for the past fifteen years. According to a 2013 report by the Pew Research Center, almost twelve million undocumented immigrants were living in the United States in 2012. (Gomez, A.) According to William Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution, immigration is “starting to have a bigger impact on more States

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    John F. Kavanaugh, a professor of philosophy and a Jesuit priest, wrote the article “Amnesty? Let Us Be Vigilant and Charitable” for an issue of America, a Jesuit publication. In his article he discusses the negatives of American immigration laws and argues for their reform. Kavanaugh begins his article by addressing his audience of Catholics in America’s emotions through the classical appeal of pathos. With his first sentence he tells the story of a lovable woman with a family who was deported back

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    In this part of the essay I will review and summarize President elect Donald. J. Trump's plans on immigration and if the ideas are feasible. The Immigration Reform plan, is based off three main principles, A nation without borders is not a nation, A nation without laws is not a nation, A nation that does not serve its own citizens is not a nation. A nation without borders is not a nation is pretty straightforward in implying that there must be a wall across the southern border, stopping geographically

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    sides in the debate about immigration. The opposing side argues that there are more negative than positive consequences to immigration reform. They believe that creating a gateway for illegal immigrants to gain citizenship will encourage more illegal immigration and reward those who have broken the law. They also argue that more immigrants will result in less resources and jobs for American citizens. Meanwhile, those who support immigration reform argue that immigration reform could actually bring social

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    Challenge of the 21st Century: Immigration Reform In 2013, nearly 1.7 million immigrants entered the United States -- a nation built with the blood and sweat of the millions of immigrants who came to it -- in search of a better life, one free from tyranny and oppression. However, only nine hundred thousand of these immigrants entered the country legally, vesting their time and resources into the legal residency “green card” program -- the very first step to full citizenship (Monger). The other seven

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    Immigration reform is back in the news, and there's a slight chance something can be done about it before fall. Everyone in this country will benefit if a good plan is put into place. This even includes the people who are so completely against doing anything about the issue. The people who say all illegal immigrants and undocumented workers should be "rounded up and sent back where they came from" will benefit just as much as those who say we should find a way to keep them here. Almost every aspect

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    United States, following the 2008 global financial crisis, led to major changes in public debate over immigration reform and, ultimately, to the enactment of immigration reform policies on the state levels across the country. Using Kingdon’s “Three Streams” and Baumgartner and Jones’ Venue-Shopping theories, this paper will discuss the policy-related impacts of the crisis on U.S. immigration reform. According to Kingdon (2011), policy change often occurs at the convergence of the three main streams

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    Six years after the promulgation of the Refugee Act of 1980 the U.S. Congress enacted the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA), on November of 1986, with the objective to control and deter the illegal immigration into the United States. The major provisions demanded; a) the legalization of foreign nationals who had been continuously unlawfully present in our country since 1982. b) Demanded the creation of mechanism to secure and enforce the United States borders. c) The legal adjustment

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    Immigration; Reform or Racism

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    INTRODUCTION How should we decide who to let in? This may appear to be a question of immigration - but is it really? In this paper we will analyze the social concepts of Otherness, New Racism, and Critical Race Theory, in trying to answer that question. As we address immigration in this country, are we talking about immigration reform or just a newer form of racism? If it is racism, what do we do about that? SUMMARY OF THE SOCIAL PROBLEM First let’s answer the question, what is racism? A full definition

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    Immigration law and reform tend to be a major issue in American Society and Politics today. Numerous immigrants come across the border today into the United States seeking freedom, jobs and a better way of life which is not much different than what people were doing when this country was first established. The birth of the United States came from immigrants of various races, nationalities and cultures that developed the foundation of where it stands today. With all these various groups of individuals

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