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Free Ideal tragic hero Essays and Papers

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    Creon as the Ideal Tragic Hero of Antigone Tragedy always involves human suffering, but not everyone who suffers is a Tragic Hero. According to Aristotle, there are five basic criteria that must be met for a character to be considered a Tragic Hero. Aristotle’s ideas about tragedy were recorded in his book of literacy theory titled Poetics. In it he has a great deal to say about the structure, purpose and intended effect of tragedy. His ideas have been adopted, disputed, expanded, and discussed

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    Oedipus Rex as the Ideal Tragic Hero If we give ourselves up to a full sympathy with the hero, there is no question that the Oedipus Rex fulfills the function of a tragedy, and arouses fear and pity in the highest degree. But the modern reader, coming to the classic drama not entirely for the purpose of enjoyment, will not always surrender himself to the emotional effect. He is apt to worry about Greek fatalism and the justice of the downfall of Oedipus, and, finding no satisfactory solution

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    The character of John Procter in Arthur Miller’s The Crucible was a great example of a truly tragic hero. He measured up to every one of Aristotle’s requirements. He was not a perfect person because he had many faults and was not completely good or bad. Best of all, he knew that he was not perfect and he recognized and regretted the errors that he made throughout his life. Then, after the reader stays with Procter while he confessed all of his horrible sins for the whole town to hear, he had was

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    Oedipus as the Ideal Tragic Hero of Oedipus the King In the introduction to Sophocles' Oedipus the King, Sophocles defines a tragic hero as one who "[behaves] admirably as a man, [but who] is nevertheless tripped up by forces beyond his control and understanding..." (Sophocles 76).  In Oedipus the King, Oedipus is the tragic hero. The force that "trips up" the hero is fate, or, moira. It is Oedipus's actions that set the events into motion,  but it is ultimately his fate, and his attempted

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    Tragic Heroes in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman and Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Dramatists such as Aristotle started to write a series of plays called tragedies. They were as follows: the play revolved around a great man such as a king or war hero, who possessed a tragic flaw. This flaw or discrepancy would eventually become his downfall. These types of plays are still written today, for example, Arthur Millers "Death of Salesman" and Henrik Ibsens "A Dolls House." "Death of Salesman"

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    Hero

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    When someone is characterized as a hero they are often someone, who is very selfless, brave and is of distinguished valor. They challenge people to some how or another follow in their footsteps, and are often models to our society. Often inspiring and showing them that no matter what they should reach for the stars. Hero's strive to find the best in people and not just in them. Men such as Siddhartha, Moses and the Great Odysseus each show their special qualities of heroes, and all were of admirable

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    The Ideal Hero in Shakespeare's Hamlet

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    Hamlet is not like the other tragic heroes of his period. He stands apart from other Shakespeare's heroes because of his innocence. Perhaps this supposed tragic hero is an ideal hero - one without the tragic flaw. The tragic flaw has been a part of the formula for the tragedy since the Golden age of Greece. The main, and, most often, the only flaw that has been attributed to Hamlet is his delay.  This seems to constitute the central part in Hamlet. Critics seem to cling to this detail, as if trying

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    Creon Tragic Hero

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    A Tragic Hero Indeed In Ancient Greek plays, tragedy is a common theme that meant to be dramatic and have the reader experience catharsis. “Antigone”, part of The Oedipus Plays of Sophocles, is a paragon of classic Greek tragedy. Human flaws cause the protagonist to fall from greatness and as a result, he loses everything; eventually, he will realize his mistakes. Creon is the tragic hero in the play, “Antigone”. Human flaws are the primary reasons for a tragic hero's demise. Creon's hubris

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    tragedies that have been written include a tragic hero that has his/her tragic flaw. In Antigone there are two main characters; Creon, the tyrant king of Thebes, and Antigone, the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta. One of these main characters must be chosen to be the tragic hero in the story. Creon and Antigone are almost polar opposites when it comes to views of society, but their attitudes are almost identical. Religion and Politics both have separate rules and ideals; some of them contradict each other

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    Using the characteristics of the neoclassical ideal, examine the usage in Moliere’s Tartuffe or Racine’s Phaedra. The neoclassical ideal really focuses on preserving the ideals of the classical period of tragedy. These characteristics include the appearance of a tragic hero, the tragic flaw that is present in our hero, evoking pity and fear for the hero, the recognition scene, and how the pace of the play follows the actions of the protagonist. Tartuffe is a comedy, but it still follows these

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