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    The Humanistic View

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    During the renaissance, humanism was a philosophy that was characterized by its blending of the concern of the history and actions of all human beings, and their influence in the world, with religious duty. Prior to renaissance thinking, medieval Europe considered life to be sinful and should despised, and that people should only be concerned about their duty to God. Writers of the renaissance time period expressed their opinions about human nature and human’s role in the universe through their

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    Humanistic Psychology

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    that the purpose of institutions is to serve and advance the freedom and power of their members. In Western civilization we honor the times and places, such as Classical Greece and Europe of the Renaissance, when such affirmations were expressed. Humanistic Psychology is a contemporary manifestation of that ongoing commitment. Its message is a response to the denigration of the human spirit that has so often been implied in the image of the person drawn by behavioral and social sciences. Ivan Pavlov's

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    The humanistic perspective on personality deals exclusively with human behavior. Humanistic psychologists believe that human nature includes a natural drive towards personal growth, that humans have the freedom to choose what they do regardless of environmental factors, and humans are mostly conscious beings and are not controlled by unconscious needs and conflicts. They also believe that a person's subjective view of the world is more important than objective reality. Two of the humanistic theorists

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    Humanistic Psychology

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    Another perspective is the humanistic perspective. The humanistics perspective is an approach in psychology that studies the uniqueness of humans as individuals and emphasis on humans being good. It is an approach that study humans as a whole. Humanistic psychologists examine the behavior of humans through the eyes of both the observer and and the person. Humanistic psychology is based on the idea of free will. They believe that humans behave according to how they feel. Humanistic psychologists also believe

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    Humanistic Psychology

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    movement named third-force psychology started as a reaction to the defect of behaviorism and psychoanalysis to deal fully with the human condition (Hergenhahn, 2008). This third-force movement is humanistic psychology, which refers to the combination of the philosophy of romanticism and existentialism. Humanistic psychology instead paid more attention to each individual's potentials and highlighted the importance of self-actualization. In addition, humanists believe that human’s uniqueness and their

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    Humanistic Psychology

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    and practices of the humanistic movement, specifically with the therapies for the different mental disorders. Psychoanalysis understands the unconscious behavior, behaviorism focuses on the conditioning process that produces behavior. Humanistic psychology focuses on the person's potential to act as a whole person in a nurturing environment by choice with receiving a positive way of life. The Humanistic Movement and Person Centered Approach to Psychology The humanistic psychology approach

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    Humanistic Therapies

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    Introduction This essay will describe 15 bullet points on psychoanalysis and its variants as well as 14 bullet points describing humanistic therapies. It will also include the main aspects of each therapy. Psychoanalysis and its Variants • According to Feltham (1995) during the era of 1886 an innovative approach to psychology was ventured by Freud (who initially took interest in neurology, hypnosis and purifying methods) by the means of free association and interpretation of the unconsciousness

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    Humanistic Psychology

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    Humanistic Psychology (humanism) is based on the belief that people are good by nature. This type of psychology holds that morality, ethical values and good intentions are the driving forces of behavior, while adverse social or psychological experiences can be attributed to deviations from natural tendencies, this is why I believe is the most interesting perspective above the rest. Humanism incorporates a variety of therapeutic techniques that focus on each individual's potential and emphasize personal

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    Humanistic Psychology

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    Augustine was a saint and philosopher. Some of Augustine’s thought can be related to the practice of humanistic psychology. My professional focus is the psychotherapy category called Humanistic-Experiential. Humanistic-Experiential therapies are, “psychotherapies emphasizing personal growth and self-direction” (Butcher, et al, 2006). The humanistic approach places primary importance upon human interests, values, and most importantly the belief in human potentials (Schultz & Schultz, 2009, pp297)

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    Humanistic Therapy

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    unique. The perceptions of people allow the study of humanistic or emotion-focused treatments. Emotion-focused treatments such as, Carl Roger’s person-centered theory, existential psychotherapy, Gestalt therapy, and constructivist approach share common beliefs. However, they differ in specific principles. Each concept of humanistic therapy analyzes the importance of perceptions and emotions in counseling and psychotherapy. The first humanistic approach was developed by Carl Rogers. In the 1940s and

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    HRM - Conflicts of Scientific and Humanistic Values 1.0 Introduction One of the popular theory of the “Critical Theorist “ ( with referrence to the Marxist view ). science reduce humankind to passive objects beholden to the laws of "nature." Sociology, as a form of science, is therefore also criticized for making scientific studies a means to an end unto themselves, as well as for not recognizing the importance of the individual. Modern society at large is criticized for being obsessed with rationality

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    Introduction to the Humanistic Approach Þ Each individual is unique Þ What matters is each person's subjective view not objective reality. Þ Reality is defined by the individual's perspective, which is based on their personal unique experiences of life. Þ Each individual strives to maximise their potential (self-actualisation) and should be responsible for their lives (free will). Þ Human nature is inherently good and self-righting History of the Humanistic Approach ==================================

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    Introduction Humanistic Psychology came about in the 1950’s. At this time the major practices of psychology were that of behaviorism and psychoanalysis. Humanistic Psychology was essentially developed as a response to these practices. Humanistic psychology can be loosely defined as a school of psychology which focuses on self-actualization, stresses growth, and focuses on potential of the individual client. One of the major beliefs of the humanistic thinkers is that change and growth cannot occur

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    key focus in understanding their lack of performance. Psychological Approach Humanistic psychology research is a mental point of view that underscores the investigation of the whole person (Stober & Grant, 2006). They look at human conduct through the eyes of the individual and the observer. Humanistic psychologists believe an individual's behavior is tied into their mental self-portrait and inner-feelings. The humanistic point of view focuses on that every individual is unique, and has the freedom

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    Humanistic and Social Development

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    The humanistic and social development curriculums are both excellent ways to design a physical education class. The humanistic approach focuses on helping students reach their maximum potential. This approach believes learning is viewed as a personal act to fulfill one’s potential. On the other hand, the social development curriculum is designed for students to interact with peers to develop in a positive way. Social development is the process of change exhibited by individuals resulting from their

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    Humanistic Therapy first originated from Carl Rogers in the 1950s. This type of therapy is most associated with client-centered therapy, meaning the client controls the majority of the therapy. Carl Rogers (1965), believes transparency is crucial in the relationship between the client and therapist (Rogers, 1965). He wants the client to be able to read the therapist and see through them to know the therapist is real and wants to help (Rogers, 1965). According to McLeod (2008), the core conditions

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    Overview of Humanistic Psychology

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    Humanistic Psychology is a psychological perspective that highlights the study of a person in whole. These psychologist look at human behavior not just through the eyes of the viewer, but also through the eyes of the client that has the behavior. These psychologist believe that an individual's behavior is associated to his or her intimate feelings and their self image. Humanistic psychologist accepts human beings are not just a commodity of the environment. These psychologist study human meanings

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    Features of the Psychoanalytic and Humanistic Perspectives Outline the key features of the psychoanalytic and humanistic perspectives, and briefly compare and contrast their views on conscious experience, a person as an integrated whole, and the role of therapists in arriving at changes. Answer In explaining and predicting animal behaviour, different schools of psychology are of different perspectives; e.g. cognitive approach focuses on the mental processes, behaviourism is based on

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    Humanistic psychology emerged as an explicit movement in the 1950’s, it was founded by George Kelly, Abraham Maslow and Carl Rogers, who felt that core aspects of human experience were being left out of account by the psychology of the time. According to the American Association of Humanistic Psychology ( 1962, p. 2) ‘ It stands for...respect for differences of approach, open-mindedness as to acceptable methods, and interest in exploration of new aspects of human behaviour...it is concerned with

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    The Humanistic-Existential Perspective The humanistic-existential perspective is both a reaction to and an outgrowth of the psychodynamic perspective. These thinkers refer to psychodynamic theory as inadequate, many were repulsed with its tendency to break down the "whole" person into discrete components, and, the idea of adapting to one's society, however questionable its values. Most importantly, they disagree that human action is beyond the individuals control, in fact they believe that

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