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    Horney And Jewel

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    spiral in my life.” Horney emphasized the individuals search for a sense of security in the world as the primary motivational force in personality. In attempting to establish a sense of security, each person develops a particular personality style for coping with the world. Jewels personality style for coping with the world is one of the rules she lives by: “To live a true to yourself life, to be honest and courageous and know that good things will follow out of that. Horney assumed that the early

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    Karen Horney

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    Karen Horney was a very influential psychologist and is often thought of as neo-Freudian. (Introduction.) Many of her theories were influenced by Freud, but she took her own spin on his views. Instead of focusing on sexual development, Horney focused on social development. According to Horney, many of the fears and anxieties children have are ultimately caused by the parents. (Introduction.) Horney had a very unusual childhood, which may have been where many of the points stated above had started

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    Karen Horney: Her Life and Work

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    Karen Horney: Her Life and Work Karen Horney, a psychoanalyst perhaps best known for her ideas regarding feminine psychology, faced much criticism from orthodox Freudian psychoanalysts during her time. Robert Sternberg said that creativity is always a “person-system interaction” because many highly creative individuals produce products that are good, but that are not exactly what others expect or desire. Thus, creativity is only meaningful in the context of the system that judges it. If this

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    Karen Horney Theory

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    and personality development did not reflect women’s visions, needs and opinions (Wellesley Centers for Women, 2011: Westkott 1989). However, Karen Horney, a psychoanalyst in the first half of the twentieth century began to question the concept of human nature being only associated with man and not woman (Eckardt, 2005). Through this questioning, Horney began to reinterpret Freud’s psychoanalytic theory on feminine psychology development, accumulating in fourteen papers written between 1922 and 1937

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    Karen Horney, a psychoanalytic theorist, established one of the top recognized concepts of neurosis. Horney alleged that neurosis stemmed from simple anxiety produced by interpersonal relationships. Horney’s theory suggests that schemes used to handle anxiety can be overworked, triggering them to take on the presence of needs. According to Horney, simple anxiety can result from a variation of things such as “direct or indirect domination, indifference, erratic behavior, lack of respect for the

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    "Unpleasant experiences with the opposite sex seem to be unavoidable" (Horney 342). This quote from Karen Horney's essay The Distrust Between the Sexes seems to be discussing Dracula. Though her essay, (a lecture originally given to the German's Women Medical Association in November 1930), does not mention Dracula directly, the points that she argued can be transposed onto Bram Stoker's Dracula. In her essay, Horney asserts that men are very concerned with self-preservation, and also that men

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    Freud Vs Horney

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    Karen Horney (1885-1952) and Sigmund Freud had a multitude of contrasting and opposing opinions on obsession-compulsion neurosis, psychoanalysis, and inner conflicts. As Freud focused on neurosis as an instinctual drive or object relationship drive that was determined biologically, Someone with the obsession disorder, or obsessional-compulsion disorder, they are caught in a neurotic caught in a neurotic bind where they are unknowing on how how to maintain health. Horney believed that obsessional-compulsion

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    Analysis Of Karen Horney

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    Critique - Karen Horney Most of Horney’s theories came from clinical experiences. With her vivid experience, she able to describes virtually and contribute to practitioners in a wide knowledge especially in neurotic personality. Horney’s comprehensive descriptions of neurotic personalities provide an excellent framework for understanding unhealthy people. In that extent, there is no other personality theorist has written so well about neuroses (Psychology, 2016). Although Horney painted a vivid portrayal

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    putting all of their faith and trust in only one other person. Horney explains that self-preservation is part of human instinct, and people have a fear of losing themselves in their loved one. Next, Horney explains how people often overlook their own impulses. The pressure from their conscience causes them to project these impulses onto their partners. Projection results in distrust of their partner's emotions toward them. As Horney moves on, she accounts for an almost unavoidable source of disappointment

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    lala

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    magazines viewed contained such messages (78). It seems that the media socializes women to value themselves according to their appearance and men are taught that being a man is about status and success rather than physicality (DeGenova and Rice 68). Karen Horney, a German psychiatrist in the early twentieth century, maintained that there is a distrust that exists between the sexes partly because “we all have a natural fear of losing ourselves in another person” (361). Because trusting someone of the opposite

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    or decreases over the period of her life shown in the movie. Horney acknowledged the influence social and cultural forces have on the development of personality. She theorised that it was these forces during childhood and not biological forces that shaped the personality (Shultz). Horney focused on the relationship between the child and his or her parents, and believed that it was a key factor in personality development (Shultz). Horney suggested that there were two basic needs in a child’s life,

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    Fedelina Paul Case Study

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    suffer from basic anxiety. Basic anxiety is an insidiously increasing, feeling of being alone in the world. Often times basic anxiety can lead to feelings of insecurity and also distant from your common environment which is referred to as basic evils. Horney then center her focused on the neurotic needs or trends that we commonly used to minimize feelings of anxiety when we are attempting to relate to others. For example, the need for a dominant partner, the exaggerated need for social recognition, or

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    through. As well as Freud, Karen Horney also created her own theories. Her theories were relatively similar to Freud’s, however, they also have their differences. It is essential to have general knowledge of their background and to understand both of their theories before we begin contrasting them. It is known

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    less popular today and they cost little to nothing. The Great Depression caused several Americans to suffer and one can envision that this cheap form of entertainment was all they could afford. Theory: themes, structures, and perspectives Karen Horney based her entire ideation of her theories on childhood experiences.

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    (1999). Karen Horney. MuskingumCollege: Department of Psychology. http://www.muskingum.edu/~psych/psycweb/history/horney.htm#Theory Karen Horney and Humanistic Psychoanalysis in Fadiman, J. & Frage, R. (1994). Personality and Personal Growth. New York: Harper Collins. (pp.130-150). Psychoanalytic Social Theory – Karen Horney (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.ivcc.edu/uploadedFiles/_faculty/_mangold/Horney%20and%20Psychoanalytic%20Social%20Theory.pdf Schultz D. & Schultz S. (2008). Karen Horney: Neurotic

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    childhood (aggression,affection). A child will “passionately” cling to one parent and feel jealous of another. However, even if their might be several aspects to these behaviors, the child ultimately wants security, and not sexual intercourse. Karen Horney also found the Freudian concept “penis envy” illogical and if this concept was even brought about so should “womb envy”. She believed sometimes boy’s do express a desire to have a baby, however it is not resulted in universal male “womb envy”. She

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    The Changing Status of Women

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    believe that women have been treated unfairly, but I also believe that women today have much better opportunities offered to them than in the past, and that women today are closer to equality than ever before. Writings by Simone de Beauvoir, Karen Horney, and Margaret Mead document that, in the past, women have been oppressed or repressed in many ways. For instance, they were not allowed to vote until 1920. Women could not hold high positions in the workplace, and they were not paid the same amount

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    Michael Jackson

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    In the 1990s Michael got married, had two children, and eventually had a third child from a surrogate mother. He later divorced and the mother did not play any significant role in his children’s lives. Michael always dreamt of being a father and this was finally his chance to have children he could love and care for. On June 25, 2009 Michael died of overdose from propofol and benzodiazepine after suffering a cardiac arrest. In his autobiography Michael was always aware of how unfortunate it was that

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    mother who humiliates her every day, all while trying to get an education. (Daniels et al, 2009) When discussing neurosis it is important not to refer to the general theory of neurosis developed by Freud but the theory of neurosis developed by Horney. Horney defines neurosis in her theory as psychological illness caused by alienation from the real self, the core personality of the person within which as the potential to grow exponentially as a person and reach self-actualization( full growth of potential)

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    characters life, causing her personality to grow and develop. One should note that this essay will not follow the order of events that take place in the movie, but rather apply these events to Horney’s theory, accounting for personality development. Horney makes use of the term ‘neurotic trends’ to account for an individual’s “behaviours and attitudes towards oneself that express a person’s needs” (Schultz & Scultz, 2008). These neurotic trends include the movement away from people (the detached personality)

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