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    Decline of Indian Southwest

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    Decline of Indian Southwest Lord Acton said, “The most certain test by which we judge whether a country is really free is the amount of security enjoyed by its minorities.” In the late 1800’s the security of the minorities in the southwest was in serious jeopardy. For the Apache’s the security was promised but rarely upheld by the American government. The minimal security the Navajo enjoyed vanished by 1846. Men like Kit Carson desired but often failed to maintain the peace and security for

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    Cree Indians

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    Cree Indians This is an introduction to the Cree Indians way of life explaining about the foods they ate, significance of story telling, myths, religious beliefs, rituals performed, and their present day way of life. It is almost impossible to touch on every aspect because of what is not printed and only known by elders. Some native words used by Cree Indians: Kiwetin meaning the north wind that brings misfortune (Gill, Sullivan 158). Another word is maskwa used for bear, the most intelligent

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    Dunbar’s Perspective on the Indians in the Film Dances with Wolves This film starts out with a wounded Civil War Veteran at war, named John Dunbar, who shows characteristics of loyalty, honor, courage, fearlessness, and strong will. After healing from his wounds, a general, who had clearly lost his mind, sent him further in the West to make post. On his way there, he and the carriage man Timmons, saw unsightly and brutally body remains, that only Native Americans left behind after their slaughter

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    An Indian Woman In Guatemala

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    An Indian Woman In Guatemala Guatemala is the land of Eternal Springs and the home of the richly cultured and historic Mayan people. It it also the country of Rigoberta Menchu, an illiterate farm worker, turned voice of oppressed people everywhere. Guatemala also has the sad distinction of being home to Latin America's oldest civil war. "For more than three decades, left-wing guerrillas have fought a series of rightist governments in Guatemala. The war has killed an estimated 140,000 in

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    Comanche Indians

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    COMANCHE INDIANS The Comanches, exceptional horsemen who dominated the Southern Plains, played a prominent role in Texas frontier history throughout much of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Anthropological evidence indicates that they were originally a mountain tribe, a branch of the Northern Shoshones, who roamed the Great Basin region of the western United States as crudely equipped hunters and gatherers. Both cultural and linguistic similarities confirm the Comanches' Shoshone origins

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    Western Perceptions of the American Indian

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    Western Perceptions of the American Indian In this reflective essay, I discuss how the Europeans perceived the American Indians and the factors that shaped these perceptions. I have paid particular attention to the first-hand accounts of the encounters with the natives, written by Western explorers, missionaries, and visitors to the New World. It is particularly interesting to note how these accounts were distorted and exploited by different groups, each trying to mold the situation in their

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    President Jackson and the Removal of the Cherokee Indians "The decision of the Jackson administration to remove the Cherokee Indians to lands west of the Mississippi River in the 1830's was more a reformulation of the national policy that had been in effect since the 1790's than a change in that policy." The dictum above is firm and can be easily proved by examining the administration of Jackson and comparison to the traditional course which was carried out for about 40 years. After 1825

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    Coming of Age in Hemingway's Indian Camp and Joyce's Araby In reading Hemingway's "Indian Camp" and Joyce's "Araby", about 2 young boy's not so ceremonial passage to life's coming of age. The protagonist Nick in "Indian Camp" witnessed in one night the joy of going on a journey to an unknown destination with his father and uncle Charlie. Later, Nick receives an expedited course in life and death. Joyce's "Araby" protagonist whis friends with Mangan but has a secret desirable infatuation with

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    Gambling On Indian Reservations: The Hope For A Nation About thirty miles off the highway and down a dirt road, you'll see the silhouette of a woman inside her house. She is exhausted, staring as the dust from the dirt floor mixes with the sunlight flowing through the holes the walls. She looks around and knows her life is in shambles. Her house is nothing more than rotting boards and rusted metal roofing. She has no electricity or indoor plumbing. Her only furniture is a moth-eaten couch and

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    How Did The Environment Affect The Native American Indians With Particular Reference To The Woodland Indians? The environment hugely affected the Native American Indians in many different ways. This is because of the way in which the Indians used the environment and the surrounding land. The Indians were very close to nature, and so that meant that any changes in nature would be changes in the Indians. Land The Indians thought of land very differently to the white man. The land was sacred

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    The Creek Indians

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    The Creek Indians Location and Background The early English traders gave the Creek native Americans their name because they usually built their villages on or near creeks or rivers. If they were to still have their villages it would include areas of Northern Florida and Eastern Louisiana and Southern Tennessee. The majority of the villages were located along the banks of the Coosa, Tallaposa, Flint, Ocmulgee, and Chattachoochee rivers. The native word for the most powerful band of Creeks

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    Indian Frontier

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    The Indian Frontier of the American West tells a story of the different Indian tribes and whites from 1846 to 1890. This period of time is very famous in American history. It produced some of the most widely heard of names in the battles between Indians and whites. These names include Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce tribe, Sitting Bull of the Oglala Sioux, Cochise, Geronimo, and Mangas Coloradas, and John Ross of the Cherokee Nation. These names are still very respected among historians and are seen

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    Touch the Earth, A self-portrait of Indian existence by TC McLuhan This book is meant to describe the experience of the North American Indian as their way of life was altered by the intrusion of white man upon this continent. The writings are composed of selections taken from letters and orations by Indians primarily from the eighteenth century until the mid-twentieth century. This historical perspective of their experience with nature is not necessarily a well-known account as far as popular

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    Indian Cuisne

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    by water but connected at the north end of the country the the rest of Asia. On it's south is the Indian Ocean. On the west, the Arabian Sea and on the east the Bay Of Bengal. It is connected to countries such as China, Nepal and Pakistan which also have had an affect on India's cuisine. India is also subdivided into 28 States and 7 Union Territories which each have different variations of Indian cuisine . Bhapa This technique is simply steaming, usually in banana leaves or in foil. This

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    Tecumseh: Great Leader of the Great Plains Indians A. Introduction B. Early life 1. Birth and influences 2. American Events C. Plan For an Indian Confederation D. Forming the Confederation 1. Religious Support 2. Campaigning throughout the frontier 3. Treaty of Fort Wayne E. Battle of Tippecanoe F. Weakening of the Confederation G. Looking for British support H. War of 1812 1. Allying with the British 2. Asisiting the British war effort 3. Campaigning with the Upper Creeks 4

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    The Genocide of the Chiricahua Indian Tribe

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    Genocide of the Chiricahua Indian Tribe United States history is taught in public schools from the time we are able to understand its importance. Teachings of honorable plights by our forefathers to establish this great nation are common. However, specific details of this establishment seem to slip through the cracks of our educational curriculum. Genocide by definition is the deliberate and systematic destruction of a racial, political or cultural group. The Chiricahua Indian Tribe of the American

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    In the 1830's the Plains Indians were sent to the Great American Deserts in the west because the white men did not think they deserved the land. Afterwards, they were able to live peacefully, and to follow their traditions and customs, but when the white men found out the land they were on were still good for agricultural, or even for railroad land they took it back. Thus, the white man movement westward quickly begun. This prospect to expand westward caused the government to become thoroughly

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    A couple of years ago, I had invited my best friend Jenene, to attend an Indian wedding. I thought it might be fun for her to experience the different foods, clothing, personalities, and religious beliefs that were particular to my culture. Later on that evening she had pulled me to the side and told me that the culture that she was raised in was completely different from mine. She was raised in New York all of her life and she had never experienced such a distinct culture. At that time I told her

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    American Indian Wars

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    American Indian Wars There is perhaps a tendency to view the record of the military in terms of conflict, that may be why the U.S. Army’s operational experience in the quarter century following the Civil War became known as the Indian wars. Previous struggles with the Indian, dating back to colonial times, had been limited. There was a period where the Indian could withdraw or be pushed into vast reaches of uninhabited and as yet unwanted territory in the west. By 1865 the safety valve was fast

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    American Indians

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    “’Indians’: Textualism, Morality, and the Problem of History';, an essay written by Jane Tompkins, a professor of English at Duke University, outlines Tompkins dissatisfaction on how American Indians are portrayed throughout history. As children, we are taught that in “1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue';, and that Peter Minuet bought all of Manhattan Island from the Indians for only twenty-four dollars worth of trinkets. In high school, we were taught that in World War II

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