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    In books 1 and 2, Aeneas shows traditional Homeric leadership qualities, for example the desire for honour gained through fighting in battle as well as eternal glory and immortality. However Aeneas begins to display proto - Roman qualities within the books, including his display of Piety: having a sense of duty towards the Gods, city state and family. On the one hand, Aeneas is a good leader as he is caring and encouraging to his men. We see this is book 1 as Aeneas and his companions dock their

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    Odysseus ' principles and characteristics are a prototype of an ideal Homeric Greek leader. Odysseus is noble, clever and loyal. Through his distress and blunders, he gains knowledge that was not only crucial for his survival but for his companions too. Odysseus’s cleverness constantly allowed him to avoid death because he relied on trickery, rhetoric and disguise. “The society depicted in The Odyssey is one where male values were dominant and where all socially relevant transactions took place between

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    Beast Similes in the Iliad Michael Clarke, in his article “Between Lions and Men: Images of the Hero in the Iliad” (1995), explores the true meaning behind Homeric similes, specifically those relating men and beasts. By studying these “beast-similes”, Clarke hopes to reveal their influence on the depiction of heroes throughout the poem, as well as the poem’s theme of heroism. The author begins the article by stating the common idea that the similes of the Iliad are simply adornments made to amplify

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    The Mysterious Homer, Author of The Odyssey and The Iliad A sketchy figure by the name of Homer is given credit for the two great epic poems of ancient Greece. The Odyssey and The Iliad influenced Greek culture, education, and morality. Little is known about Homer and many scholars question whether he existed at all. (Encarta) Some say two different unknown authors wrote the two poems. (Britannica) Others say that many oral poets were responsible for the finished products. (Britannica) In this

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    Homer and the Poetic Elevation of Man In Richard Martin’s introduction to the Richmond Lattimore translation of The Iliad he writes, “The Iliad is about heroes as humans, and what constitutes humanity.” (p. 2). This is an intriguing assertion for a piece of poetic work that deals with historical violent conflict. However, through an increasingly complex interplay between the moral quandaries of man and Gods, as well as the talented execution of poetic devices and style, Homer, arguably, is able

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    “Even here, merit will have its true reward…even here, the world is a world of tears and the burdens of mortality touch the heart” (1:557-559). With these words, Aeneas contemplates his divine-fated destiny that finds its heroic beginning amongst the destruction of Troy. Aeneas, the classical hero who willfully submits to his purpose-filled fate, is created by Virgil in order to transcribe the foundational origins of Rome though the mutation of the Greek into the Roman, the Eastern cultural and

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    In the Iliad, the oldest and greatest of the Greek epics, Homer tells of the wars fought between the Greeks and the Trojans. Much of this book's main focus takes place during the Homeric period in which the Trojan War began. In a pre industrial society, Homer describes the way mortals and immortals sought their existence throughout the Trojan War. Homer's style of writing in Iliad enables a modern reader to perceive how the Ancient Greeks thought of warfare, of religion, and of the role of women

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    Historical records objectively illustrate the danger that arises from unsafe ideas, and these ideas must consist of correct ones to ensure the survival of a community. Therefore, a political community must consist of individuals who understand the essential concepts of life. However, if the needs of a political community are not met the critical ideas about life for a populace will not fully come into fruition. It is thereby where texts like Aristophanes’ Clouds, Plato’s Euthyphro, and Apology that

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    Hector by Apollo. The gods are perpetrators in the waging of war against their male/female counterpart deities- their mortal counterparts merely fighting for them by proxy. The behaviour of the gods cannot be condoned as ethical even in context of the Homeric ages- their behaviour is depicted by Homer as amoral and uncaring. Plato developed religion in the true sense of the word, as a consequence of behaviour not in accordance with the human soul. As mentioned, the gods do not perform a perfunctory role

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    Gender in the Odyssey

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    Odysseus' values and character traits serve as a paradigm of the ideal Homeric Greek man. The "god-like Odysseus" is crafty, valiant, wise, and eloquent. He gains much of his knowledge through travel, the meeting of different cultures and peoples and learns from suffering and mistakes. He is an aristocrat and a warrior of all warriors. We first learn of many of these traits in Homer's Iliad. Agamemnon, the commander of the Greek army always calls on Odysseus for assignments that required someone

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