Free Hippocampus Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Hippocampus

    • 522 Words
    • 2 Pages

    was found to be a couple of sub regions of the hippocampus: CA1 and CA3. After briefly mentioning the importance of these two sub regions, I will focus my attention on the hippocampus as a whole. According to Eric Kandel, a professor and neuropsychiatrist, the hippocampus has three important regions: CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus. CA1 is near the output area of the hippocampus and its individual cells code for space. Since we know the hippocampus has a large involvement in memory, the CA1 region

    • 522 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Hippocampus Essay

    • 1137 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Through studies performed on sleep-deprived rats, experimental results have shown a decrease in cellular activity in the hippocampus. The hippocampus is responsible for most of the brain’s memory processing. When entering into sleep deprivation, the brain will experience consequences such as a failure for the hippocampus to encode, consolidate, or retrieve signals powering memory processing. As a result, researchers are looking for cellular characteristics that could lead to further details into

    • 1137 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Hippocampus Essay

    • 939 Words
    • 2 Pages

    What is the role of the hippocampus and associated areas such as the entorhinal cortex and medial septum in spatial navigation: Do theta oscillations have a significant effect on spatial navigation and could this shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms ? The hippocampus has been associated with memory formation and consolidation, through lesions studies of bilateral medial temporal lobectomy patients, such as the famously amnesic H.M. In 1971 with the discovery of place cells by O’Keefe and

    • 939 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Significant Role of the Hippocampus

    • 1158 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited

    Significant Role of Hippocampus Hippocampus is a small, curved region, which exists in both hemispheres of the brain and plays a vital role in emotions, learning and acquisition of new information. It also contributes majorly to long term memory, which is permanent information stored in the brain. Although long term memory is the last information that can be forgotten, its impairment has become very common nowadays. The dysfunction is exemplified by many neurological disorders such as amnesia. There

    • 1158 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    surface of everyday life for someone with a defective hippocampus. The hippocampus is part of the brain that deals with memory and on forming and sorting memories. The details of the right and left hippocampus, which lie in the limbic system of the brain have been studied to great detail by neuroscientist. The importance of mild stress is examined by many brain scientist as a good thing, but the effect of chronic stress on a person’s hippocampus was described as negative, and able to leave the two

    • 1163 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The hippocampus, as observed in voluminous studies associated with dementia, plays an important role in episodic memory (Aggleton and Brown, 1999; Ball, 1977). The aim of this larger project that I will participate in will focus on understanding how and in which

    • 1144 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Various clinical and psychological studies have shown that the hippocampus in the medial temporal lobe is responsible for important learning and memory. In the majority of studies, many researchers propose that the hippocampus is responsible for long-term memory (LTM). LTM impairments occur when damages to bilateral hippocampi are present and can result in anterograde amnesia (difficulty in forming recent memories), retrograde amnesia (difficulty in retrieving memories from the past), or both. However

    • 835 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Genus Hippocampus

    • 1965 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited

    Hippocampus The Genus Hippocampus belongs to the family Syngnathidae, order Syngnathiformes, class Osteichthyes, phylum Chordata, and kingdom Animalia. The genus Hippocampus is made up of more than twenty different species of seahorses (Beltran). They live preferably in the coral reefs or sea grasses where they can easily camouflage to avoid predators. They are found mostly in the tropical or temperate shallow water areas of the oceans around the world. Seahorses are most closely related to sea

    • 1965 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Hippocampus Essay

    • 687 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Organized in the class Actinopterygii, seahorses, Hippocampus spp., are marine dwelling organisms found in bodies of water which span from tropical to temperate zones around the Earth. As cited by Foster in Life History and Ecology of Seahorses, research by R. A. Fritschze suggests that the genus Hippocampus diverged at least 20 million years ago from its ancestral origins. Research pertaining to organisms organized under the genus Hippocampus are conflicting in regards to the number species contained

    • 687 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Hippocampus Integrates

    • 964 Words
    • 2 Pages

    the Hippocampus is being affected by plagues and tangles. The Hippocampus is usually one of the first areas affected by the disease (Brayne, 2014). Once the disease spreads to the Hypothalamus some of the symptoms that may become evident are functions that are effected by different hormones such as, hunger, sleep, temperature regulation, sex drive and mood swings (Baloyannis, Mavroudis, Mitilineos, Baloyannis & Costa, 2014). Finally, the amygdala which is in the same area as the hippocampus and

    • 964 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Seahorse Hippocampus Introduction Seahorses are a prime example of species whose atypical biology and unusual global distribution leads to a series of evolutionary questions. Seahorses (genus Hippocampus) are a marine species that have extensively been studied because of their abnormal behaviors in the marine environment compared to other marine creatures. Many of the seahorse species have large ranges, both longitudinally (over a great horizontal distance across the ocean), and latitudinal (great

    • 913 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Retrograde Amnesia

    • 975 Words
    • 2 Pages

    individuals affected by them. The first of the two I’ll be talking about is anterograde amnesia, anterograde meaning after, is the form of amnesia where you can't form new memories or in proper terms you are unable to use or have lost use of your hippocampus the organ in your brain that is responsible for converting short-term memory to long-term memory. There are many causes for this type of amnesia, generally it is caused by some sort of injury to the brain like, head trauma, illnesses, alcohol intoxication

    • 975 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Hippocampal Memory: An Internet Based Look

    • 1215 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited

    part in a specific area of the brain. This evidence has come from lesion studies as well as from victims of the disease Alzheimer's. In regards to memory, one are of the brain might be significant, that is the hippocampus. (http://www.epub.org.br/cm/n01/memo/mechanisms.htm) The hippocampus is a structure in the temporal lobe of the brain. It was the first place where long term potentiation was found. Long term potentiation is believed to affect the brain's plasticity. That plasticity is what might

    • 1215 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Memory loss, closer than you think if you drink © spanaut Available from: https://www.flickr.com/photos/cs___/2057057016/ Have you ever been drunk and forgot what you were doing while you drunk? Or did you remember that you have ever been drunk a lot without being told by your friends or others? ‘No.’ Is it the answers to both questions? It is a normal experience as getting drunk may brings us to a state of alcoholic blackout. And alcoholic blackout shows that there is a high relationship between

    • 1124 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Limbic system

    • 617 Words
    • 2 Pages

    sophisticated set of brain structures found above the brainstem and below the cerebrum while lying on both sides of the thalamus. It includes a group of brain structures that surround the brainstem such as the amygdala, hypothalamus, thalamus and hippocampus. These are the main structures, but there are also some minor related areas such as the cingulate gyrus, ventral tegmental area, basal ganglia, and the prefrontal cortex. Function: The limbic system is responsible for many human emotions or drives

    • 617 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    severity of injury to the hippocampus determined whether patients developed amnesia or not. This associates with Leonard 's injury, in order for Leonard to suffer from anterograde amnesia, the attacker must have hit him hard enough on the head to cause damage to the hippocampus and the frontal lobe. In the scene where Leonard attacks the assailants, he is struck in the front of the head, thus explaining the damage to the frontal lobe and the amplified damage to the hippocampus, located in the center

    • 1306 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    brain and the brain of an autistic person. Dr. Joseph Piven from the University of Iowa noticed a size difference . In the autistic brain, the cerebellum is larger and the corpus callosum is smaller. Another study showed that the amygdala and the hippocampus are different in an autistic brain. In an autistic these structures have densely packed neurons and the neurons are smaller than those in a healthy brain. Also, in the cerebellum there is a noticeable reduction in the number of Purkinje cells.

    • 1255 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Amnesia: Who Are You Anyway?

    • 1206 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 11 Works Cited

    involve the limbic system, which includes of the hippocampus in the medial temporal lobe of the brain) (1). The hippocampus encodes memory for events and episodes. Memories, either short term or long term, are not stored in the hippocampus. But instead, information gets pro... ... middle of paper ... ...duced Blandness... http://www.macalester.edu/~psych/whathap/diaries/diariesf96/Kai/diary12.html 4)TRAUMATIC AMNESIA, REPRESSION, AND HIPPOCAMPUS INJURY DUE TO EMOTIONAL STRESS, CORTICOSTEROIDS

    • 1206 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 11 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Influence Of Insulin

    • 1142 Words
    • 3 Pages

    otherwise. The hippocampus has been shown to contain significant levels of insulin receptors as well as GLuT4. These findings suggest that insulin may have an influence on hippocampal neurons as well. The problem is, that

    • 1142 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    and because of this, it is classified into two classes – retrograde and anterograde – respectively. Amnesia has multiple causes, of which include brain damage and degenerative diseases, impairing areas of the brain such as the temporal lobe or hippocampus. Because amnesia is of biological, physiological origins and deters cognitive processes such as memory creation, it implies an interaction between the two bodily processes in amnesia. This applies inversely to extensive memory usage, namely spatial

    • 1562 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays