Free Hesiod Essays and Papers

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  • Works and Days by Hesiod

    1171 Words  | 5 Pages

    Sometime around 750-600 B.C.E., the Greek poet Hesiod produced what is generally thought to be the oldest surviving Greek poetic works. During this time, Greece was near the middle of its Archaic period, a period of technological, social, political, and cultural innovations. This was the period in which the first true alphabet system arose, the system which allowed Hesiod and other poets like him to record permanently the oral stories and lyrics so important to Greek culture. This was also the time

  • The Greek Attitude Towards Women as seen in the Works of Hesiod

    722 Words  | 3 Pages

    Works of Hesiod Hesiod leaves no doubt that the existence of women is on balance a terrible thing for men. Zeus ordered Hephaistos to create women as a punishment for his having been decieved.. Women were to be a poisoned gift for men, which "all shall take to their hearts with delight, an evil to love and embrace" (W&D, 57-59). In the Theogony women are called "a great plague" because they are "ill-suited to Poverty’s curse, but suited to Plenty" (592-93), among other flaws. While Hesiod offers

  • Hesiod’s Theogony

    1326 Words  | 6 Pages

    enhance other stories and conceptions. Across the globe, people know well the story of the one who deceived Zeus and stole fire for man, but few recognize its role in Hesiod’s work as a whole. The story of Prometheus serves two primary purposes for Hesiod and his audience. First, it solidifies Zeus’s position as king of the gods, providing one of the first characterizations of his temperament, and second, it serves as a mode of explanation for those evils in the world which plague mankind. Caught

  • The Greek Nyth Prometheus

    546 Words  | 3 Pages

    Hesiod and Aeschylus both tell the tale of Prometheus, the god that stole fire from Olympus and gave it to man. Each author takes a different position on the matter: Hesiod condemns Prometheus and man, while Aeschylus celebrates them, which is evident in several characteristics of the myth. First, the role of the female in the relationship between man and gods in each myth is different. Hesiod, for example describes woman as “an evil'; created by the gods to punish man for accepting fire. Woman

  • Deception in Sophocles' Philoctetes and Hesiod's Theogony

    1354 Words  | 6 Pages

    Deception in Sophocles' Philoctetes and Hesiod's Theogony For many centuries, the art of deception has been a powerful tool for achieving goals, and it has spawned the ancient debate of the ends justifying the means. In the tragedy Philoctetes by Sophocles and in Hesiod's Theogony, there are many instances of deception, particularly on the part of men in the texts. For each of them, the deceit is justified as a means of building and maintaining a reputation or obtaining power. Ultimately

  • Succession in Myth

    1106 Words  | 5 Pages

    In a succession myth, the familial relationship between the gods is significant. In the three works: The Babylonian Enuma Elish, The Hittite Illuyanka Myths (version 2) and the Greek Theogony by Hesiod; it can be argued that the succession of the gods is a reflection of their power and that this power eventually leads to a redistribution of position within the gods. In the Babylonian Enuma Elish, each generation of god is proclaimed to be stronger than the last and eventually this culmination of

  • Succession in Myths

    712 Words  | 3 Pages

    In a succession myth, the familial relationship between the gods is significant. In the three works: The Babylonian Enuma Elish, The Hittite Illuyanka Myths (version 2) and the Greek Theogony by Hesiod; it can be argued that the succession of the gods is a reflection of their power and that this power eventually leads to a redistribution of position within the gods. In the Babylonian Enuma Elish, each generation of god is proclaimed to be stronger than the last and eventually this culmination of

  • Comparing the Epic of Gilgamesh, Hesiod's Theogony, and Ovid's Metamorphoses

    3429 Words  | 14 Pages

    authoritative one, especially considering it has come from a mortal, like us, who is part god. Because Gilgamesh is part god, we realize that if he can accept his lot in life, his mortality, then we mere mortals should be able to do the same. In Theogony, Hesiod prepares his audience to accept the story by telling (ad nauseum) that the Muses have worked through him to create... ... middle of paper ... ...M.E.L. Early Mesopotamia and Iran. McGraw-Hill: New York, 1965. Ovid. Metamorphoses. Trans. Rolfe

  • The Destructive Power of Love in Hesiod's Theogony

    1149 Words  | 5 Pages

    root cause of a lot of problems. The most obvious destructive result of love is its role in the creation of both harmful powers and vicious creatures.Ê Echidna, daughter of Keto and Phorkys and great-granddaughter of Night, is one such monster.Ê Hesiod describes her as ?half fair-cheeked and bright-eyed nymph / and half huge and monstrous snake? (298-299).Ê Despite her dark nature, she is not immune to Eros? lure.Ê She ?[lies] in love / with Typhaon, that lawless and dreadful ravisher? (306-307)

  • Plato Republic The Noble Lie

    1183 Words  | 5 Pages

    from such a system and presents the idea in the form of an allegorical myth. His allegory was based in part on the prevalent belief that some people were literally “autochthonous,” born from the soil, and partly from the stories of the philosopher Hesiod who chronicled the genealogy of the gods and goddesses as well as their accomplishments and exploits. Hesiod’s account of the Golden, Silver, and Bronze races which had succeeded one another before the current to “The Republic’s” age of Iron forms

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