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    Hate crimes

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    Victims of hate crimes vary in the indiscretions placed against them, whether it is from a simple slander to a vicious attack. But they all have the same mutual notion that the crimes that were committed against them are far above other crimes because they were carried out in hate. I believe that the idea of creating a separate punishment for crimes of this nature is absolutely nonsensical and inane in theory. In the attached article, it states that “Congressional negotiators stripped a measure to

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    Hate Crimes in America

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    Hate Crimes in America Hate crime is not a new phenomenon. Hate crimes have been prevalent in society for as far back as one can document it. In the United States alone, racial and religious biases have persisted for centuries. Even from the time that the first settlers landed in America, hate crimes have existed. The westward-moving English settlers were perpetrators of hate crime against the Native Americans. The Know Nothing Party in the 1850s held extreme anti-Catholic sentiments.

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    The History Behind Hate Crime and the Existing Legislation Many political scientists and researchers to a number of policy arenas in the United States ranging from corporal punishment to the quality of urban life have applied Daniel Elazar’s concept of political cultures. For a vast majority of these policy programs, a considerable correlation has been found to exist between the region examined and its approach to a specific policy. Elazar focused on three primary political cultures: the Moralist

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    Hate Crime

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    Hate Crime Violence motivated by a bias against victims’ characteristics which include race, religion, ethnic background, national origin, gender, or sexual orientation, represents a serious threat to all communities. Experts estimate that a bias-related crime is committed every 14 minutes. Criminal justice officials and state policy makers need to realize that it is key to make or adjust hate crime legislation. This has been a heated debate for centuries. The key to solving the ever-growing

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    picketers carried signs saying, "God Hates Fags" and "Fags Deserve to Die." Matthew Sheppard is one of the thousands of victims who have suffered from the form of violence known as hate crimes. Someone commits a hate crime every hour. In the most recent data collection, 2014, a reported 17, 876 hate crimes were committed. This is a national crisis that we cannot allow to continue. Today we will discuss the problems associated with this horrendous crime, causes for it, and finally steps we

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    Hate Crime Essay

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    of a crime may exist, society wonders if the types of victims affected by these crimes have any effect on their court jurisdictions. The 14th amendment to the Constitution clearly states that no person can have unequal protection of the law, but new regulations passed by Congress seem to come into conflict with this idea. As the history of hate crime legislation has progressed, so has the number of people hate crime laws protect. For this matter, many citizens with lawsuits deem these new laws unfair

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    Hate Crime Laws

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    sentenced ring leader John King to death by lethal injection (“Man Executed for Dragging Death of James Byrd”). While this particular case may give the appearance that perpetrators of hate crimes receive appropriate punishment, almost a decade later, one particular case demonstrates the inequity in the application of hate crime punishments: In 2007, Sean Kennedy of Charleston, South Carolina, left a bar around 3:45 am and was confronted by Stephen Moller, who called him a “faggot” and then punched him

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    1955, a fourteen-year-old African American boy named Emmett Till took a trip to visit relatives near Money, Mississippi. He had dealt with segregation in his hometown of Chicago, but his experiences could not even begin to compare with the extreme hate crimes that occur in Mississippi. While showing some local boys a picture of his white girlfriend back home, one of them said, "Hey, there's a [white] girl in that store there. I bet you won't go in there and talk to her." Emmett went into the store and

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    Hate Crimes

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    Hate crimes are not a new concept for society, because hate crimes have always been around. While the study of hate crimes and the laws that have been passed because of hate crimes is relatively new, hate crimes have always been around. Hate crimes were committed as far back as the 1800’s and even back to The Civil War. Hate crimes are prevalent in society today just like they were in the past; because whether the crimes are aimed towards Muslims, the gay community, or any other minority group; they

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    Hate Crimes and The Mitchell v. Wisconsin Decision The American Heritage Dictionary defines hate as intense dislike or animosity. However, defining hate as the basis for a crime is not as easy without possibly jeopardizing constitutional rights in the process. Hate crime laws generally add enhanced punishments to existing statues. A hate crime law seeks to treat a crime, if it can be demonstrated that the offense was a hate crime differently from the way it would be treated under ordinary criminal

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