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Free Hardboiled Essays and Papers

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    detective genre had changed. It is very interesting to note how the conventions of 1940’s hardboiled private eye fiction translate into the 1970’s. The low-rent drabness of the genre loses much of its allure. The dark shadows and long nights of urban Los Angeles become the bright lights and warm sunshine of Malibu beaches. The detective’s normally snappy dialogue turns into joking asides. Marlowe’s hardboiled narration becomes the self-conscious mutterings of a lonely man talking to himself. The romantic

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    poem ‘Stealing’ by Carol Ann Duffy confronts us with various characters related with crime giving us an intuition into the motivation and perspectives of unique individuals. Day presents both Claudia Valentine, a subverted representation of the hardboiled detective and also Harry Lavender a typical criminal mastermind. Likewise Duffy presents an ambiguous individual who glamourises criminal acts against society. Eventually expressions within the two texts ensure that readers understand the actions

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    The Sign of Four is a detective novel written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, which was published in 1890. It is Conan Doyle’s second novel to feature detective Sherlock Holmes. Sherlock Holmes is a master detective, known for his deduction skills, disguises and most importantly, his use of the city as means of solving mysteries. The cityscape plays a significant role in the narrative of The Sign of Four. Conan Doyle uses real places found in London in The Sign of Four. It gives the novel a degree

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    riddled with double-crossing characters, bootleggers and crooked authority figures that obviously challenge universal moral codes of conduct. More importantly, some characters remain more morally ambivalent then others. Although, this is a troupe of hardboiled detective novels from the time, and the Film Noir genre where nothing is as it seems, there are particular characters and events that stand out. The language and situations are so double sided that the reader is forced to question the weave of their

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    David Guterson's Snow Falling on Cedars Whilst setting up a puzzle to be solved, good crime fiction also takes the opportunity to explore and comment on the world it is depicting by conforming to and subverting the conventions of crime fiction. This can be seen in David Guterson’s Snow Falling on Cedars in which he utilizes and adapts the conventions of the courtroom drama, enabling him to not only present a murder mystery, but also to explore the prejudices on an American 1950s audience

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    The Big Sleep: Movie vs. Novel

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    that can be constructed however the artist (Hawks in this case) wants. The novel is the inspiration; the film, the work itself. Howard Hawks chose to film The Big Sleep in the genre of film noir; this seemed like the obvious choice for a hardboiled detective novel. Film noir is the "'dark film,' a term applied by French critics to [the] type of American film, usually in the detective of thriller genre, with low-key lighting and a somber mood" (Bordwell 479). By using this genre of filmmaking

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    Twin Peaks: Postmodernism

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    Twin Peaks as a postmodernist text David Lynch employs parody and hyperrealism in his hit 1990s Tv series, Twin Peaks: a detective story that melts into a soap opera with hints of sitcom. Twin Peaks (which is apparently set in modern day but somehow incorporates elements of 50s style and dress) fully embodies the potentialities of postmodernism through its humorous and hyperbolic portrayal of characters and themes. Postmodernism revels in comedy and exalts the spirit of play; it cheerfully deviates

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    Introduction: Disorder - both in narrative and of narrative - is omni-present today, and trauma and syndromes proliferate: Tourette Syndrome1 has become a trope for the whole post-modern condition... Amnesia is more widespread than in living memory... Attention Deficit Disorder adds up... These disorders and their names are more familiar to us than ever before, and the terminology of trauma and symptomology no longer belongs to a narrow professional (medical or therapeutic) register. We are

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    Finding James Cain's Life in Mildred Pierce

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    Roy. Cain: The Biography of James M. Cain. Southern Illinois: University Press, 1987. Marling, William. Hard-Boiled Fiction. Case Western Reserve University. Updated 2 August 2001. (http://www.cwru.edu/7177060/artsci/engl/marling/hardboiled/Cain%20James.HTM) Murray, Bill.  James M. Cain: July 1, 1892 - October 27, 1977.(http://www2.rmcil.edu/users/dhaynes/hum120/caincainbio.htm) Skenazy, Paul. Cain James M. (James Mallahan), 1892-1977. New York: Continuum

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    Crime Fiction Essay

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    There are many factors and events that led to the development of the crime fiction novel of the 1920s. From as far back as July 4, 1776 America has been coined the land of opportunity—a free land for all people and all purposes. It was also a country full of immigrants seeking that same prosperity. The only problem was that this “American dream” didn’t come as quickly as most thought it would. This resulted in the growth of America’s gun culture which was already deeply imbedded in this country’s

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