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    Haig and His Men

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    Haig and His Men Source Based I think that Source A does not prove that Haig did not care about the lives of his men. It just shows that he knows that you cannot fight a war without having casualties. You know that he knows this because he says "No amount of skill on the part of the higher commanders, no training however good, on the part of the officers and men, no superiority of arms and ammunition, however great, will enable victories to be won without the sacrifice of men's lives."

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    Terrorism and Morality by Haig Khatchadourian In “Terrorism and Morality,” Haig Khatchadourian argues that terrorism is always wrong. Within this argument, Khatchadourian says that all forms of terrorism are wrong because the outcome deprives those terrorized of their basic humanity. To this end, Khatchadourian says that even forms of terrorism that are designed to bring about a moral good are wrong because of the methods used to achieve that good. Before Khatchadourian spells out why terrorism

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    Blaming Haig for the Slaughter of the Somme 1. Source A is a balanced source. It is from a book called Field Marshal Haig, which was written by the historian Philip Warner in 1991 makes this source Secondary Evidence because it was written some time after the war. It contains both pro Haig and also anti Haig parts. Here are some of the pro Haig points, "If the criterion of a successful general is to win wars, Haig must be judged a success". This statement praises General Haig in the way

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    Analysis of Defining the ‘American Indian’ by Haig A. Bosmajian “One of the first important acts of an oppressor is to define the oppressed victims he intends to jail or eradicate so that they will be looked upon as creatures warranting suppression and in some cases separation and annihilation” (Bosmajian 347). The writer, Haig A. Bosmajian, begins his essay with these words in “Defining the ‘American Indian’: A Case Study in the Language of Suppression.” In his essay, which targets mainstream

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    Haig As a Leader

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    Haig As a Leader I think Haig was a bad leader who made many critical mistakes during the battle of Passchendaele. From looking at the sources I can see many bad views of Haig as a war leader, although some good views can also be detected. In source A it is evident that Haig always ensured that his army was well equipped by asking the War Cabinet for more ammunition. I also know that Haig was

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    The Work of Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig (1861 - 1928) 'Kill more Germans' summarised Haig's strategy as Commander in chief of the British forces in France during most of World War One. His war of attrition resulted in enormous numbers of British casualties and his leadership remains controversial. As a young officer, Haig fought in the Sudan, in the Boer War and held administrative posts in India. From 1906-1909 he was assigned to the War Office, where he helped form the Territorial

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    Field Marshall Haig

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    Field Marshall Haig Sir Douglas Haig replaced Sir John French as commander of the British army. He faced many problems from the state French had left the army in. He faced the task of planning battles and training his army. His tactics were first put to the test at the Battle of the Somme in 1916 and the casualties began to rise into unacceptable numbers. The British army put their faith into Haig because of his reputation as a great leader. He had had past success' during the Boer War

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    Haig v. Agee: Power to Revoke Passports Whether a passport can be revoked or not has been a major question since the mid- 1800's. Haig v. Agee is a landmark Supreme Court case charging that the Secretary of State can not revoke a passport on the grounds that the power has never been granted by the Congress to the Secretary, and that revoking a passport violates the first and fifth amendments of the Constitution of the United States. Not only does the Secretary of State have implied powers, but

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    General Douglas Haig

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    General Douglas Haig deserve his reputation as the “Butcher of the Somme?” as a plentiful amount of historians criticise him for why multitudinous soldiers died during the battle of the Somme, essentially due to his poor battle plan, but alongside every event there is two sides to what has happened. The battle of the Somme arose because the British and French armies were required to relive German pressure off the French town of Verdun as well as gaining an expansion of territory. Haig was chosen to

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    Haig as a Successful Commander Field Marshal Douglas Haig was one of the most controversial people of the Great War. While he brought eventual victory, he is accused of being responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of young men during 1916 and beyond. I will begin by looking at source C and the opinions of the fighting man on Haig. Fred Pearson was an infantryman that fought under Haig, and so might not have ever met him. His thoughts on Haig are in an angry, annoyed tone, saying

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