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    The Function of the Greek Chorus

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    milestones, and popular morality. The Greeks' skill in weaving stories and imagery was so intricately powerful that a complete universe was created in their legends. The chorus was one of the primary tools for elegantly setting the stage for such detailed works. In Mythology, Edith Hamilton exalts the works of Aeschylus, which heavily employ the chorus for context, saying “With Homer, they are the most important source for our knowledge of the myths.” (17) The chorus provides insight to classicists,

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    Greek Theater Chorus

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    "Chorus in Greek Theater." Encyclopedia of Ancient Literature, Second Edition. Facts On File, 2014. Ancient and Medieval History Online. Web. 16 Nov. 2015. A typical chorus is a group of singers usually performing with an orchestra, and is refer to by most people in modern day time as a choir. In Ancient Greek a chorus is usually consist of a group of men who would sang and danced. According to Facts On File “s Greek theater had its origins in religious liturgy, the chorus also sprang from associated

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    force of vengeance links the chorus to each of the play’s protagonists. For both plays, the choruses begin with a strong support of their heroes with a belief that the course of action that those characters are pursuing for the sake of avenging the wrongs done to them or their families is just and right. The chorus of Medea, however, moves away from that original conviction in the moral justification of revenge. Over the course of The Libation Bearers, the chorus also begins to express doubt in

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    The Role and Structure of Greek Tragedy in Philip Roth’s Eli the Fanatic When one’s in pain—physical, mental, or emotional—one always believes it is worse than everyone else’s. Yet when an acquaintance bemoans a bad day, one still manages to wave it off: it could not be worse than one’s own pain. Even if it is a past pain and there are only scars, those scars are tenderer than the friend’s current sores. Individuals forget that anguish can be shared and another’s intervention can diminish it

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    revenge while Hamlet died while taking a revenge. In Agamemnon, even if the chorus already gave him a hint that not everyone will be glad to see him because they did not like his superstitious sacrifice of Iphigeneia, Agamemnon still enters the house walking on a crimson silk, a hubristic act, trusting that Clytemnestra is in fact happy to see him. This simple error of trusting Clytemnestra called hamartia, an element of greek tragedy, had lead to his death. After 10 years of battling with Troy, he

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    Religion, Greek Tragedy, and Heroism: An analysis of Miguel de Unamuno & San Manuel Bueno, Martyr: In Miguel de Unamuno’s novella San Manuel Bueno, Martyr, readers learn about the life of Don Manuel, a Catholic priest secretly holding atheist beliefs and doubts in the afterlife. Despite these disbeliefs, Don Manuel works tirelessly to help his community and is regarded as a saint by all who meet him, hence the handle “San Manuel,” which literally translates to “Saint Manuel.” Don Manuel’s struggle

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    In the Blood

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    In the Blood and Greek Tragedy In the Blood (1999), by playwright Suzan-Lori Parks, tells the sad tale of protagonist Hester La Negrita, a homeless, black single mother to five fatherless children. At its core, the play is a powerful allegorical treatise, social commentary and criticism of America’s welfare system and its treatment of the poor. It exposes the double standards, brutality, prejudice, and sexual persecution of those whom are branded morally bereft and, therefore, most vulnerable to

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    Controversy in Greek Tragedy Medea The Greek tragedy Medea is a tale of a woman scorn and the wrath that follows. The story is one of outright deceit, crippling revenge and questionable justice. It is typical of Greek tragedies in its simplicity, but atypical in the way it justifies horrific revenge. Medea is one of Euripides' most enduring plays. It and only a handful of others have survived the several thousand years since their conception. Medea is a typical Greek tragedy. The opening

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    Agamemnon is a Greek play that has a wonderful balance of drama and action. Despite all of the thrilling and impressive dialect, the story remains a tragedy. It has several deaths mentioned and recalled, as well as thick plots being plotted, and a gripping storyline. All of these things are tragedies because of the human emotion behind them. It is what makes this story interesting. One of the tragedies in this play is that Agamemnon kills his own daughter. When the gods demanded her life in exchange

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    Christian Tragedy and Samson Agonistes

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    blindness of all Christians who seek the path of salvation without divine guidance, and his tragedy is the tragedy of all those who convince themselves they have found it on their own. While Milton is very much working under the circumscription of Greek tragedy, his choices of interlocutors for Sampson speak to his fascination with a major paradox of Christianity: that man cannot work out his faith alone, and yet he must. By removing all direct divine presence from the poem, Milton explores the consequences

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