Free Great Railroad Strike of 1877 Essays and Papers

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Free Great Railroad Strike of 1877 Essays and Papers

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    The Great Railroad Strike In the first half of the 19th Century the working class in the newly industrializing American society suffered many forms of exploitation. The working class of the mid-nineteenth century, with constant oppression by the capitalist and by the division between class, race, and ethnicity, made it difficult to form solidarity. After years of oppression and exploitation by the ruling class, the working class struck back and briefly paralyzed American commerce. The strike, which

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    Panic of 1873

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    government policies were making the credit problems worse. The severe economic downturn was going to cause political and social changes which lasted for decades beyond the end of the depression in 1879. The Panic of 1873 resulted in labor unrest, violent strikes, political upheaval, huge concentrations of wealth, and desperate migrations to Indian-populated parts of the West, and ended the Reconstruction-Era protections for blacks in the South. The United States economy had become so co-dependent with other

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    where the railroads wrought havoc upon the daily lives, health, and safety of those who lived in the cities. The trains on the railroads in the cities disrupted the lives

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    The Great Railroad Strike of 1877, which began on July 16th 1877, was the first national labor strike in the United States. The strike spread along the network of American railroad lines. Unorganized railroad workers, reacting to pay cuts and a loss of control to their company bosses demanded a work stoppage that was meant to halt all railroad traffic. Railway officials attempted to keep the trains running with militia and replacement workers but failed at the outset because of increasing popular

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    RESEARCJ

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    attention of thinking minds throughout the civilized world." -J. A. Dacus, on the Great Railroad Strike, 1877 Rapid industrialization during the nineteenth century revolutionized commerce, communication, politics, and American social life. But in the wake of such transformation, one emerging group was left behind: the common laborer. When workers finally revolted in 1877, their cause, which became known as the Great Railroad Strike, marked the first national labor event in United States history and served

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    how it helped shape us is vital for progress. The great country we live in was not formed overnight; it took many years of trial and error to get it right and we are still learning. There are many major events that have shaped our country, a few being the first transcontinental railroad, the Railroad Strike of 1877, the Niagara Movement, the annexation of Hawaii, and the creation of the Federal Reserve System. The first transcontinental railroad led the way for the advancement in modes of transportation

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    They were able to get Illinois to pass a bill that set maximum rates that could be charged by railroads and grain-storage services. The laws were not without opposition and soon enough they were challenged in court. The most well-known case involving the Granger movement came about in 1877 when a Chicago grain storage firm called Munn and Scott appealed the 1871 law (“Munn v. Illinois”). The case made it all the way to the Supreme Court. Munn

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    Ajaylae Banks 4th Period 13 Dec. 2016 How successful was organized labor in improving the position of workers? Industrial Workers and farmers experienced many technological advancements after the second industrial revolution. The building of railroads helped farmers and industrial workers, making agribusinesses and the shipping of goods possible.Technological advances, such as the telegraph, typewriter, telephone, electric motors, and barbed wire, spurred significant growth in industrial activity

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    The History of Labor Unions

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    problems ranged from being replaced by machines to the introduction of corporations. Even though the laborers had to face these problems, many of them address these problems. They addressed the problems by creating unions and by having strikes. Even if the unions or strikes were successful or not, they laborers always strived for better living. Works Cited Tindall, George Brown., and David E. Shi. America a Narrative History. 8th ed. Vol. 2. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2007. Print. Farless, Patricia

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    AP US DBQ

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    various strikes and protests to show their viewpoint in the hopes that they would be noticed. In their first attempt to get noticed, workers formed the National Labor Union in 1866. This union joined together various workers in order to create a group that would fight for what they wanted: higher wages and shorter workdays. As the years went by, the National Labor Union did their best in trying to achieve their goals, all while other groups took the matters into their own hands. In 1877, in what

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