Free Grand Isle, Louisiana Essays and Papers

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    The Awakening, by Kate Chopin

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    all the additional women in her life because she questions her life ambitions and dreams and realizes that she does not fit into the usual role of a wife and mother. The Awakening begins on Grand Isle, an island off the coast of Louisiana and then to the state of Louisiana and then the story ends on Grand Isle. This story focuses on metaphors, symbolism, difference and the personal struggles that a woman might face during the nineteenth century where men are the dominating force and women stay home

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    The Awakening by Edna LeBlaine

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    changing environments in Edna’s world are representative of her changing inner life and ultimately her outer world. INTRODUCTION: Kate Chopin’s, The Awakening is set in nineteenth century Louisiana. The action takes place partly in New Orleans, a small and easygoing city, and partly in Grand Isle and the nearby island of Chêniére Caminada. The environment of the areas and the buildings affected the way the protagonist, Edna, experienced her inner life. With each change whether it is to a

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    Chopin and Edna Pontellier as Feminists Kate Chopin is known for her literary works that depict culture in New Orleans, Louisiana, and of women's struggles for freedom. She was born Katherine O'Flaherty in Missouri, and later married Oscar Chopin in 1870. He was a Creole cotton trader from New Orleans. Later they moved to a plantation near Cloutierville, Louisiana, where her husband died in 1882. She returned to Missouri with her six children, and began her writing career. She began writing

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    only as property to be displayed to other men, Edna begins to feel more and more constrained by her roles and struggles with the societal views on equality initiating her self-discovery of individualism and sexuality. While vacationing in Grand Isle, Louisiana Edna spends her time with a Creole friend while her husband is working and is exposed to an openness surrounding sexuality that she has never experienced before. Because Edna was not brought up in the type of culture where discussions about

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    The Importance of Setting in The Awakening

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    house is not home. Edna was not herself when enclosed behind the walls of the Pontellier mansion. Instead, she was another person entirely-- someone she would like to forget. Similarly, Edna takes on a different identity in her vacation setting in Grand Isle, in her independent home in New Orleans, and in just about every other environment that she inhabits. In fact, Edna seems to drift from setting to setting in the novel, never really finding her true self - until the end of the novel. Chopin

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    The Awakening

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    Orleans after her marriage and lived there for twelve years until the death of her husband. She returned to St. Louis where she began writing. She used her knowledge of Louisiana and Creole culture to create wonderful descriptions of local color, and she incorporated French phrases used by the Creoles. The Awakening begins at Grade Isle, a vacation spot of wealthy Creoles from New Orleans. Edna is there with her two sons and her husband Leonce who comes and goes because of business. Edna is not Creole

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    women of the time. Edna is bound by the confines of a loveless marriage, unfulfilled, unhappy, and closed in like a caged bird. During her summer at Grand Isle she is confronted with herself in her truest nature, and finds herself swept away by passion and love for someone she cannot have, Robert Lebrun. The imagery of the ocean at Grand Isle and its attributes symbolize a force calling her to confront her internal struggles, and find freedom. Chopin uses the imagery of the ocean to represent

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    Symbolism in Kate Chopin's The Awakening

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    life and her growing awakening and stresses her physical and external... ... middle of paper ... ... from it. Works Cited and Consulted Chopin, Kate. "The Awakening." The Complete Works of Kate Chopin. Ed. Per Seyersted. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 1969. 881-1000. Delbanco, Andrew. "The Half-Life of Edna Pontellier." New Essays on The Awakening. Ed. Wendy Martin. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1988. 89-106. Giorcelli, Cristina. "Edna's Wisdom: A Transitional and Numinous Merging."

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    Pontellier, a woman with an independent nature searching for her true identity in a patriarchal society that expects women to be nothing more than devoted wives and nurturing mothers. The Awakening begins in the vacation spot of Grand Isle. At first we believe that Grand Isle is a utopia, wealthy families relaxing at oceanside, but it is here where Edna first begins to realize her unhappiness. The first sign of dissatisfaction is when Edna allows herself to feel that her marriage is unsatisfying, yet

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    “dabbled” with sketching “in an unprofessional way” (Chopin 543). She could only imitate, although poorly (Dyer 89). She attempts to sketch Adèle Ratignolle, but the picture “bore no resemblance” to its subject. After her awakening experience in Grand Isle, Edna begins to view her art as an occupation (Dyer 85). She tells Mademoiselle Reisz that she is “becoming an artist” (Chopin 584). Women traditionally viewed art as a hobby, but to Edna, it was much more important than that. Painting symbolizes

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