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    that of aboriginals in Canada. The question that is asked is should there be an aboriginal self-government? If the government were to go ahead and give the natives there own government they would be losing money and would most likely have angry taxpayers after their asses for the rest of there sorry political lives. The government would also have to deal with a swarm of Quebecans that would be harassing them because of their decision to give the natives their own government, because of their 1995

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    and The Government's Ignorance of Farmer's Needs Saskatchewan farmers have been continually ignored in Canada's institutional landscape. Never has the situation been more evident as it is with the possibility of Quebec separation. The Canadian governments ignorance of farmers' needs has caused a cynical view of the political process in the eyes of farmers. One of the major sources of the cynicism is that Canadian federal institutions are developed so that most political of the clout is developed

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    have chosen to compare are China and Canada. Their systems of government are very different and have different powers and rolls in their country. Canada has a system of government very similar to our own. While china's government appears to be similar as well, but it is quite different. Canada's government democratic and is parliamentary in form but, very much like our own. Like all large governments it is representative democracy. Canada has a central government designed to deal with the country as

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    “Multiculturalism” entered public speech in the late 1960s and early 1970s in Canada that focused on unique cultural diversity, nationalities, and ethnicity across the nation. Multiculturalism and Immigration are important factors in the development of Canada to attain a strong multicultural example of economic stability, social and political growth which leads to the emergence of Canada’s identity and culture. The artefact design indicates the deep understanding of Canadian Multiculturalism which

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    Outline and assess the concept of “reinventing government”. What does it mean and what are its strengths and weaknesses? Does the reinvention thesis provide Canadian governments with a viable way to reform and restructure the nature and working of public administration in this country? Why or why not? The reinventing government concept was best explained by two Americans, David Osborne and Ted Gaebler. They made this concept known across a wide popular audience and also enhanced the perceived legitimacy

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    Neoliberal Government Policies in Canada

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    impact that the shift to neoliberal government policies has had on workers in Canada. I have chosen to explore this topic through looking at the restructuring of unemployment insurance in the 1990’s neoliberal era when it came to be called employment insurance (McBride, 2005, pg. 90). Tentative Thesis: I plan to argue that the transition from the Keynesian based unemployment insurance to the neoliberal employment insurance has had a negative impact on workers in Canada. Tentative Answers to the Questions

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    Native Sovereignty

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    marked the beginning date of the Oka Crisis in Quebec Canada. It lasted until September 26th 1990 resulting in one fatality of a local police officer. The violent clash was triggered by something as simple as a golf course extension and as complicated as native burial traditions. It had drawn world attention, catapulting native land rights into the mix. The Oka Crisis is just one of many conflicts between the Aboriginals and the Canadian government. A major issue that has been of much debate in the

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    Canada's Interning the Japanese: Justified?

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    invading Canada in World War Two cause racism to arise in Canada. After Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941 (Bolotta et al, 2000), Canadian citizens feared the Japanese immigrants living in Canada may aid Japan in attacking. Worried about its citizens and problems that may arise, the Canadian government prevented the problem by interning Japanese Canadians. The issue with this solution was the Canadian Government was not justified in interning the Japanese Canadians. The Canadian government had no reason

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    Prime Minister of Canada stands alone from the rest of the government. The powers vested in the prime minister, along with the persistent media attention given to the position, reinforce the Prime Minister of Canada’s superior role both in the House of Commons and in the public. The result has led to concerns regarding the power of the prime minister. Hugh Mellon argues that the prime minister of Canada is indeed too powerful. Mellon refers to the prime minister’s control over Canada a prime-ministerial

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    Refugees: How to Solve the Problem

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    grandfather was left behind. Since my grandfather was stateless, he went to multiple embassies and tried to claim refugee status. To his advantage, he worked for British American Tobacco and would sell it to the soldiers as a bribe. The Canadian government at the time recognized that most of these refugees were highly educated, English-speaking and would assimilate into Canadian culture with ease. Also benefitting the economy. Unfortunately, my family ended up in the Eastern townships in Quebec (my

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