Free Gothic Genre Essays and Papers

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    considered by many literary critics to be the quintessential gothic novel despite the fact that most of the more conventions of the genre are either absent or employed sparingly. As many of the literary techniques and themes of Mary Shelleys Frankenstein adhere to the conventions of the gothic genre it can be considered, primarily, a gothic novel with important links to the Romantic movement. The period of the gothic novel, in which the key gothic texts were produced, is commonly considered to be roughly

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    The Complexity of the Southern Gothic Genre Southern Gothic represents a grotesque and dark era that occurred in the American South after the Civil war. Many authors explored the many elements of this genre and its used to give a mysterious and gloomy aura to short stories. This genre creates suspense and mystery, but also reflects on social issues that were relevant in the early 19th century. “A Good Man is Hard to Find” by Flannery O’Connor and A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner are both examples

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    The Gothic Genre and What it Entails

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    1800. Gothic literature has been an area of critical contention since Horace Walpole's seminal Gothic novel, The Castle of Otranto, was published in 1764. Although vilified by much of the contemporary press the Gothic had its champions, many of whom were also its practitioners including Walpole, the subsequent generation's Anne Radcliffe and the Marquis de Sade who had his own brand of highly sexualized Gothic. Despite these voices, Gothic was still a marginalised genre in its incipient

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    tale As a Sub-Genre of The Gothic Here I will expound upon how the vampire tale is undoubtedly a sub-genre of the Gothic Genre. I will also attempt to tackle the tricky question of whether the vampire tale falls within the subsection of the terror gothic or the horror gothic. In order to emphasize my points and observations I will refer to two scenes in the short story appropriately titled The Vampire, by John Polidori. In the Vampire several elements of the Gothic are readily

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    Nineteenth Century Short Stories and the Gothic Genre The three short stories that I have chosen to compare and contrast are: The Signalman by Charles Dickens, An Arrest by Ambrose Bearcy and Napoleon and the Spectre by Charlotte Brontë. All these stories were completed by the mid to late eighteenth hundreds. The Signalman is set by a railway in Britain, along a lonely stretch of a railway line in a steep cutting. An Arrest is set in America and for the most part in a forest. Napoleon

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    The Development of the Gothic Genre in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Up until 1800, literature in general consisted of a spontaneous expression of idyllic images of love - ultimately categorised as "The Romantic Movement." From this sprouted Romanticism's antithesis - literary Gothicism. When it was first introduced in the late 18th century, Gothic literature featured accounts of terrifying experiences set in graveyards or ancient castles, and descriptive motifs such as flickering lamps

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    the late 19th century by H.G Wells. During this time the gothic genre was incredibly popular with every type of person as it was a great form of entertainment due to the fact they didn't have a television or a computer back then. The gothic genre started becoming most popular in 1837 and continuing untill 1901 during the Victorian period, they appeared in magazines as short,cliffhanger ending,eerie stories. The most famous examples of gothic stories are "Frankenstein" by Mary Shelly and "Dracula"

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    How Emily Brontë Fulfills the Expectations of the Gothic Genre Within this essay I will examine the social and historical background of Emily Brontë's upbringing, and the way her only novel, wuthering height, is related to the gothic genre. Emily Brontë was brought up in a time very different from our own; she lived on secluded moors and without many of our modern day privileges, and became very close to her family. Many of her close family members died within her lifetime, affecting her

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    How Does the Language in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Reflect its Gothic Genre The gothic genre was popular around the nineteenth century. It is often associated with dark, evil things and death. This seemed appropriate at the time as there were no electric lights or televisions so it was generally darker than it is in the present day. It brings to mind stories like Frankenstein, Dracula and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. It may have been popular at this time because it is typically based about ominous

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    Exploring Deep Issues Through the Gothic Genre in Mary Shelley's Chapter 5 of Frankenstein Introduction: Mary Shelly inquires into many issues using the Gothic genre. Shelly explores the theme of religion according to the society that she had lived in. Shelly also explores loneliness through Victor Frankenstein and the creation of Victor, the monster. Mary explores the taboo issues of Victorian society through her novel and looks deeply into the idea of 'playing God' using Victor; she investigates

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    Buffy the Vampire Slayer

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    Buffy the Vampire Slayer Mentors feature prominently in the Gothic genre. From Dr Van Helsing in Bram Stoker's Dracula, who leads the young heroes into their quest to annihilate the Count, to Rupert Giles, the Watcher in Buffy the Vampire Slayer, older and more experienced adults have provided essential guidance for the younger protagonists of the genre. The differences in media of expression and the subsequent adaptations from novel to television series has not affected the presence of this

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    Using the Gothic Genre in Frankenstein and A Modern Prometheus In the novel of Frankenstein - The Modern Prometheus, Mary Shelley chooses to use the gothic genre as it reflects many of her past experiences, and in some cases, flaws in her upbringing. The plot of Frankenstein reflects Mary Shelley's past experiences as many essential elements can be extracted from the storyline such as ; Mary Shelley herself was a motherless child, as her mother, feminist writer Mary Wollstonecraft died 9

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    Disentangling Genres

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    distinguishes one literary genre from another, aficionados of a particular genre sometimes answer, "I know it when I see it." It may be true that some devotees develop a sixth sense in identifying a literary work as belonging to a specific genre. However, uncommunicated intuitive knowledge does little to either define relatively new or fledgling genres, or distinguish  break- away genres, such as exploration and science fiction from the similar or closely related "parent" genres of travel and adventure

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    Deception and Destruction of Purity in The Italian Purity in the Gothic genre can be perceived from so many points of view. It involves sex, beauty, perception, and people's position in society. "The Italian" has many characters that behold either one or more of these traits. In this paper, we will explore how Ann Radcliffe uses purity and the deception and destruction of it to enhance her character's role in the Gothic genre. "The sweetness and fine expression of her voice attracted his attention

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    Buffys Deeper Meanings

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    by storm, it is becoming increasingly obvious that Buffy does more than just kick vampire butt. Star Sarah Michelle Gellar not only entertains teens nation wide, but also questions morals and values – the same values that have been plaguing the gothic genre since Bram Stoker’s Dracula – and socialises with the majority of young Australians’ lives. Popular culture is becoming increasingly consumed by a moralistic tone, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer is the perfect example. Ever since Stoker wrote his

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    An essay on different genres including the Ghost genre and the Fantasy & Adventure genre I have chosen two completely different genres to base my essay on. Firstly, I have the mysterious and gripping Ghost Genre; the books I have studied are “The Woman in Black”, “The Langoliers” and the spooky film, “The Others”. The second genre is Fantasy & Adventure. The book I am studying is “Lirael”, a recent book written by Australian author Garth Nix. “The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of The

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    series written by Chris Carter. The series can be described as a 'hybrid' genre because it reflects a number of different genres. The obvious genre is Science Fiction because one of the main themes of the series is the paranormal. However there are strong elements of the Mystery/Detective genre as the two main characters, which are FBI investigators, seek to find the truth of the paranormal. There is also a Horror/Gothic element to the series because many investigations include searching for

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    affected them and fulfils their expectations of the thriller genre; also, particularly, what makes them feel fear , what has played on their psychological well-being. We gave out 40 questionnaires in total. A number of questions were asked that focused on the main conventions of a thriller. We analysed this research and it became extremely useful, for example, we found that in the target audience most people enjoyed the sub genre of the psychological. From this information we could model our

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    amina

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    pp. 32-41, The University of Chicago Press. Scruggs, Charles. (2004). ‘“The Power of Blackness”: Film noir and its critics’, American Literary History, Vol. 16, No. 4, pp. 675-687. Oxford University Press. Solomon, Stanley J. (1974).‘Film study and genre courses’, College Composition and Communication, Vol. 25, No. 4, pp. 277-283.National Council of Teachers of English. Warshow, Paul. (1977). ‘More is less: Comedy and sound’, Film Quarterly, Vol. 31, No. 1, pp. 38-45, University of California Press

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    Young Goodman Brown:  Genre and Plot Young Goodman Brown is a short story; that is, it is a relatively brief narrative of prose fiction (ranging in length from 500 to 20,000 words) characterized by considerably more unity and compression in all its partstheme, plot, structure, character, setting, moodthan the novel. In the story we are considering, the situation is this: One evening near sunset sometime in the late seventeenth century, Goodman Brown, a young man who has been married only three

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