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    Themes in Faulkner’s Go Down, Moses The three main themes I can place in Go Down, Moses are the role/significance of family structure (familial relationships), the idea of property/ownership, and the relationship between man and nature. The story “Was” presents a story involving the black branch of the McCaslin family tree (Tomey’s Turl is biologically Carothers McCaslin’s son who has been betrayed by his father who allows him to be raised as a slave). It establishes a major theme (the idea

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    Southern Racial Inequality in Faulkner’s Go Down, Moses All the stories in Go Down, Moses had a common thread: the McCaslin family. One story, however, stood out from the rest for lacking a McCaslin main character. This story was, of course, “Pantaloon in Black.” At first, I thought this story of grief was almost a beautiful love story. When Rider lost his wife and first love, he was so grief-stricken he didn’t even care to live. However, the conclusion on the story took any beauty out of this

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    Man’s Interaction with the Environment in Faulkner’s Go Down, Moses I found the short stories in Go Down, Moses to be long, boring, and hard to comprehend. As usual Faulkner writes his stories with no regard to punctuation. His run-on sentences are confusing and unnecessary. However, I did notice the theme of man and his interactions with the environment stressed throughout these stories. “Was” starts us off with ‘Uncle Ike’ McCaslin in his old age and tells the story of his elder cousin

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    Black vs. White and New vs. Old in Go Down, Moses In the novel Go Down, Moses, William Faulkner examines the relationship between blacks and whites in the South. His attempt to trace the evolution of the roles and mentalities of whites and blacks from the emancipation to the 1940s focuses on several key transitional figures. In "The Fire and the Hearth," Lucas Beauchamp specifically represents two extremes of pride: in the old people, who were proud of their land and their traditions; and in

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    Contrasting Lucas Beauchamp of Go Down, Moses and Joe Christmas of Light in August Lucas Beauchamp, found in Intruder in the Dust and Go Down, Moses, is one of William Faulkner's most psychologically well-rounded characters. He is endowed with both vices and virtues; his life is dotted with failures and successes; he is a character who is able to push the boundaries that the white South has enforced upon him without falling to a tragic ending. Living in a society which believes one drop of black

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    “The Cask of Amontillado” Revenge can be sweet, but in this case it is just down right grotesque! In Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” it talks about a gentlemen named Montressor and how he is angry at Fortunato for insulting him in the past. Montressor will not let this go unpunished, so he thinks up a clever scheme to get back at him. This plan is in a way, ingenious but most definitely insane and crazy. This story dates back into the 1800’s. The time of year, Mardi Gras. A good friend

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    Grapes of Wrath

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    The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck is a novel depicting the struggle and distraught brought towards migrant workers during the Great Depression. The Grapes of Wrath follows one Oklahoma family, the Joads, as they journey down Route 66 towards the earthly paradise of California. While on route to California, the Joads interact with fellow besieged families, non-hospitable farmers, and common struggles due to the Depression. Steinbeck uses these events to show strong brotherhood through biblical

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    Thursday Night

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    campus. All of this changed though, one Thursday during my second semester. I was in my last class for the day, chemistry laboratory. My friend Laura, who was also in the class had been trying to convince me to go to a party with her all semester. I, all semester, had been making excuses to not go. This day though, she finally convinced me by exclaiming, "But SueEllen, it's the last party of the semester!" I succumbed to her persuasiveness and went back to my dorm to prepare. My room-mate, Melissa, was

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    American culture is incubated and hatched in the cafeteria. Students go to the dining hall to get the food their bodies need for proper nourishment. But, food is by no means the only thing that students get at the cafeteria - they are also served with social interaction. The cafeteria is a place which some students love and which others dread. It is generally an integral part of children's social lives from elementary school all the way into college. Why is the cafeteria so important? Because, in

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    Using Computers in My Work What comes to mind when you hear the word computer? When I realized what profession that I wanted to go into I didn’t realized just how much computers will affect me. I decided around the age of sixteen or seventeen that I wanted to become an executive protection specialist, also known as a bodyguard. I never really gave it much thought about it. After putting some thought into it I discovered that computers in general, especially laptops, will play an important

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