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Free Glycogen Essays and Papers

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    Glycogen Storage Disorder

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    Glycogen Storage Disorder There are many different things that can go wrong in our bodies. A metabolic disorder can be one. There are many different kinds that maybe deadly if left untreated and others can be treated but still left to deal with for the rest of one's life. One disorder can be glycogen storage disorder this can affect many different age groups from new born to the elderly. It deals with the function of the body to obtain its greatest source from which it obtains energy from. It deals

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    Glycogen Storage disorder

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    because when the glycogen enters the lysosomes and is not broken down but it build up and this well then stop the lysosome from function correctly. Well the lysosome is an important part of the cell that collects all the unwanted waste of the cell. And it also collects waste and secretes it back into the cell into smaller quaintly to be used. So as the glycogen starts to build up and dispute this function it well create the problem of breaking down complex sugars such as glycogen to glucose that is

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    Glycogen Storage Disease

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    Introduction: Glycogen storage disease is the result of a defect in the synthesis or breakdown of glycogen that is found in muscles, the liver and many other cell types. This disease may be genetic or acquired and is usually caused by a defect in certain enzymes that are important in the metabolism of glycogen. To date, there are 11 different classifications for glycogen storage disease but this paper will focus on glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD I), also known as von Gierke’s disease, after

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    overactivity of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) may be implicated in the impaired insulin action2. Although GSK-3 is a distal element of the insulin signaling pathway (which includes insulin receptor substrate 1 or IRS-1), when it is overactive, this affects both insulin signaling and the removal of glucose from the blood stream by skeletal muscle. Firstly, when GSK-3 is activated it phosphorylates glycogen synthase (GS) and, as GS is inactive in its phosphorylated form, this inhibits glycogen synthesis

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    Muscle glycogen accumulation after endurance exercise in trained and untrained individuals is a paper written about a study that measured the glycogen accumulation in the tissues of muscles of trained and untrained people after they performed strenuous exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine if a group of trained individuals was more capable at excelling at strenuous exercises in comparison to a group of untrained individuals. The scientists conducting the test hypothesized that trained

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    Glycogen Storage Disease Type II

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    Glycogen storage disease Type II, also known as Pompe disease and Acid maltase deficiency, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that results from the deficiency of the enzyme acid α-glucosidase (Ibrahim 1). This deficiency results in the accumulation of glycogen in certain organs and tissues, especially muscles, impairing their ability to function normally. The disease is classified by the time of onset: classic infantile onset and non-classic late onset (Van Der Beek 82). Pompe disease was

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    The goal of this scientific study was to determine if the delayed onset of fatigue, as a result of consuming carbohydrates, was associated with stopping muscle glycogen depletion. Therefore, this web page is dedicated to presenting the important points of the study and to expand on those ideas in order to encompass a more general function of carbohydrates in our daily activities. The basic outline of the experiment consisted of a control group and an experimental group; both groups contained endurance-trained

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    performance. Endurance athletes, e.g. marathon runners, rely on their stores of glycogen as a source of energy during competition. Carbohydrate loading is a legal method of boosting the amount of glycogen in the body prior to a competition. Six days prior to a competition the process begins. For the first three days the athlete consumes minimal carbohydrate and exercises so as to deplete the body’s glycogen stores. In the last three days the athlete consumes primarily carbohydrate and reduces

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    Diabetes

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    is essential to process carbohydrate, fat, and protein. Insulin reduces blood glucose levels by allowing glucose to enter muscle cells and fat cells and by stimulating the conversion of glucose to glycogen as a carbohydrate store. Insulin also inhibits the release of stored glucose from liver glycogen and slows the breakdown of fat to triglycerides, free fatty acids, and ketones. Additionally, insulin slows the breakdown of protein for glucose production. Hyperglycemia results when insulin deficiency

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    Regulation of blood glucose in the human body Cannon (1989) used the term homeostasis to describe the consistency of the internal environment and the regulatory integrated mechanisms are directed to maintain it. He also stated that it was how the system responded to an emergency by trying to meet the sudden external demands which have been placed upon the human body (1). Homeostasis is important within the human body because it maintains the optimum environment required for various processes to occur

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