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    Fishing Industry in Gloucester Gloucester Massachusetts is known for its fishing industry. Over 1200 people’s jobs in Gloucester lay in the fishing industry. The fishing industry first derived when people from Europe came over looking for a better life. Gloucester is America’s oldest seaport, and now it is fighting to survive. Now with new rules, and diseases in the sea, the fishing industry will never be what it was decades ago. One of the earliest settlements, Gloucester, Massachusetts, is famous

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    the understanding of the emotions of the characters in the play. This follows the parallelism between Gloucester and King Lear. In King Lear, the subplot of Gloucester corresponds to the major plot of King Lear. Both fathers have their own loyal legitimate child and their evil and disloyal child. They are both honourable men, who have children that return to them in their time of need. Gloucester and Lear are both tormented, and their favoured child recovers their life. In the early beginning of the

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    In Shakespeare's classic tragedy, King Lear, there are several characters who do not see the reality of their situation. Two such characters are Lear and Gloucester. Both characters exhibit a blindness to the world around them. Lear does not see clearly the truth of his daughters mentions, while Gloucester is also blinded by Edmond's treachery. This failure to see reality leads to Lear's intellectual blindness, which is his insanity, and Gloucester's physical blindness that leads to his trusting

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    An Analysis of Gloucester

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    views of the character, Gloucester in the play King Lear. It will show the different ways that Gloucester has his eyes ripped out. It will also show the different ways the lighting is used and what kind of scenery. It will also show the difference in the ages of the character. Let’s not leave out the wardrobe and the difference between both productions. It will show how Gloucester ages and has similar problems as that of the King. In the first part of the play Gloucester receives a letter from Edmond

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    and blindness associated with the characters of Lear and Gloucester illustrate the theme of self-knowledge and consciousness that exist in the play. These classic tropes are inverted in King Lear, producing a situation in which those with healthy eyes are ignorant of what is going on around them, and those without vision appear to "see" the clearest. While Lear's "blindness" is one which is metaphorical, the blindness of Gloucester, who carries the parallel plot of the play, is literal. Nevertheless

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    King Lear

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    King Lear Summary The play, “King Lear” by William Shakespeare, starts with noblemen Kent and Gloucester having a conversation and the audience finds out that Gloucester has two sons. Edgar who is his heir, and Edmund his unimportant son. This info. leads to the mini-plot. Then, Lear enters to say that he is going to end his life’s tasks and problems. He then points to the map, he tells the people there that he will split his land into three parts. They are going to be given to his three daughters

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    The Theme of Justice in King Lear

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    either a fatalistic or moralistic point of view, depending on their beliefs about the presence or absence of a higher power.  The theme of justice in relation to higher powers can be illustrated from the perspective of King Lear, Gloucester, and Edgar. When reading King Lear, it is helpful to understand the Elizabethan "Chain of Being" in which nature is viewed as order. Rosenblatt (1984) states that there was a belief in  an established hierarchy within the universe

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    Lack of Judgment by King Lear

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    The good are misjudged as evil and the evil are accepted as good.  It is not until the end of the play that the righteous people are recognized as such.  There is great treachery and deceit involved in the hierarchy of English rule. King Lear and Gloucester both make great mistakes by banishing their righteous children and trusting in treacherous characters. Lear made the great mistake in this play when he decided to divide up his kingdom among his three daughters. In order to determine which share

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    is induced in the audience. In "King Lear", it is noted from the beginning of the play that both Lear and Gloucester suffer from self-approbation and will consequently find revelation by enduring "the rack of this tough world". While Lear mistakenly entrusts the shallow professions of love from his "thankless" daughters - Goneril and Regan - instead of the selfless words of Cordelia, Gloucester shadows a similar ignorance by initially entrusting love in the evil Edmund, rather than Edgar, whom we consider

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    King Lear

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    defined as the inability of the eye to see, but according to Shakespeare, blindness is not only a physical quality, but also a mental flaw some people possess. One of Shakespeare’s dominant themes in his play King Lear is that of blindness. King Lear, Gloucester, and Albany are three prime examples, of how Shakespeare incorporates the theme of blindness into the story. Each of these character’s blindness is the primary cause of the bad decisions he makes; decisions which all of them will eventually come

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    Family Themes in Shakespeare

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    obsession with being praised blinded him to the child who was really the only one who loved him, Cordelia. The same with the Earl of Gloucester, he was blinded by his illegitimate child, Edmund, who set out to turn him away from his heir, Edgar. Within the story, these two children and a few loyal servants try to help and eventually try to save the King and Gloucester, but they are both too stubborn to recognize the goodness and true bond in these people. The story of King Lear deals with the turmoil

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    Lear revolves mainly around the conflict between the King and his daughters, although there is a definite and distinct sub-plot dealing with the plight and tragedy of Gloucester as well.  One of the main themes that Shakespeare chooses to focus on in King Lear  is the dysfunctional nature of not only the royal family and Gloucester, but the heartache and emotional strain that goes along with being a parent and having to make a decision that will divide your children.  This play focuses on not only

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    King Lear

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    is the betrayal of the king and of Gloucester, and the reconciliation between them and their loved ones in the end, and the authority versus the chaos in the city on England and finally the Justice issue in which both the bodies of the good and the bad lay next to the each other in the end of the play. 2.     Shakespeare implies a parallel between the two themes of Blindness and Madness. The two characters who suffer the most in the play are Lear and Gloucester. Their stories are similar in many

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    misconceptions which result in a long sequence of tragic events. The foundation of the story revolves around two characters, King Lear and Gloucester, and concentrates on their common flaw, the inability to read truth in other characters. For example, the king condemns his own daughter after he clearly misreads the truth behind her “dower,”(1.1.107) or honesty. Later, Gloucester passes judgment on his son Edgar based on a letter in which he “shall not need spectacles”(1.2.35) to read. While these two characters

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    The Tragic Character in King Lear In William Shakespeare’s King Lear, the similar events that Lear and Gloucester experience result in a parallel plot sequence for the story. Lear and Gloucester are similar characters because they are experiencing similar problems while playing the role of a father. Their children also have a similar eagerness for power, a problem that both Lear and Gloucester should not have to deal with while addressing serious mental and physical dilemmas. And although the two

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    this theme is through the characters of Lear and Gloucester. Although Lear can physically see, he is blind in the sense that he lacks insight, understanding, and direction. In contrast, Gloucester becomes physically blind but gains the type of vision that Lear lacks. It is evident from these two characters that clear vision is not derived solely from physical sight. Lear's failure to understand this is the principal cause of his demise, while Gloucester learns to achieve clear vision, and consequently

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    Role Reversal in King Lear

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    destruction of two families. At the end of this play two of the protagonists, King Lear and his loyal friend the Earl of Gloucester, die after having suffered through major injustices at the hands of their own children. These characters’ deaths are incredibly tragic because they are brought on by their own actions instead of by the circumstances that surround them. Lear and Gloucester are not bad men but rather good men that make the fatal mistake of not acting according to their positions in life. In

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    King Lears Blindness

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    KING LEAR, Shakespeare illustrates that wisdom does not necessarily come with age. The mistakes that Lear and Gloucester make leave them vulnerable to disappointment and suffering at a time in their lives when both should be enjoying peace and contentment. Although both Lear and Gloucester achieve wisdom before they die, they pay a dear price for having lived life blindly. Lear and Gloucester both illustrate that wisdom does not always come with age. Lear asks his three daughters to express their love

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    the kingdom?  Was the Earl of Gloucester really that rotten of a father that he drove his son to do all of this? According to my reading of the text, the Earl of Gloucester probably paid mightily to send Edmund "out nine years" (presumably studying abroad) (I.i.32).  Gloucester admits that he had "so often blushed to acknowledge him," but he seems to take some pride in how Edmund turned out, regardless of his conception (I.i.10).  It is assumed that Gloucester loves Edgar better than Edmund

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    Fools In _King Lear_

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    fool. Edmund, for instance, may be seen as a fool in the sense that he is morally weak. His foolishness lies in the fact that he has no sense of right or justice, which rewards him with an untimely, ironic death. He discusses this as his father, Gloucester, leaves to ponder the "plotting" of his son Edgar. Edmund soliloquizes, "This is the excellent foppery of the world, that when we are sick in fortune... ...we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars, as if we were villains

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