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    are present in Beowulf rom beginning to end, even in the better half of the poem, Part I. Perhaps this is part of what makes it an elegy – the repeated injection of sorrow and lamentation into every episode. In his essay, “The Pessimism of Many Germanic Stories,” A. Kent Hieatt says of the poem Beowulf: The ethical life of the poem, then, depends upon the propositions that evil. . . that is part of this life is too much for the preeminent man. . . .  that after all our efforts doom is there for

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    Cultural Identity and the Language of Food

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    simply means to devour. According to the American Heritage Dictionary (AHD), the word banquet has been fluctuating for a long time. The Old French word banquet, the likely source of our word, is derived from Old French banc, “bench,” ultimately of Germanic origin and originally from the Indo-European *bheg (Shipley, 31). The sense development in Old French goes from “little bench” to “meal taken on the family workbench” to “feast.” The AHD cites the English word banquet as first recorded in a work

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    Sutton Hoo and Beowulf

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    first was excavated in 1939, and Beowulf has not been the same since. Mound One contained a a great ship burial, the richest treasure ever dug from British soil, and the most important archaeologicl evidence found in Europe for the era of Germanic migrations during the fifth to seventh centuries (Clark 34). This find made the ship-burial of King Scyld in the opening of Beowulf very realistic and true to historic fact: Scyld then departed             at the appointed time, still very

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    tales written by the Grimm Brothers are known for being "German fairy tales." So what makes these tales so Germanic and others tales not? How do Grimms' "German tales" compare to others? Through evaluating two works by the Grimms, The Brave Little Tailor and Aschenputtel, we will answer these questions. The characteristics that the Grimm fairy tales possess do seem to be quite Germanic. The German people are usually very stubborn, more violent than not, and very sarcastic. In The Brave Little

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    The making of Beowulf involved the choosing of formulas mostly, from a common body of narrative, rather than individual words, and largely on the basis of alliterative needs. In his esay, “The Pessimism of Many Germanic Stories,” A. Kent Hieatt says: The Germanic peoples seem to have inherited a common body of narrative, which is a key to understanding the often incomplete and puzzling allusions and interpolated stories forming a large part of Beowulf” (45). In his essay “The

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    the reasons behind the unification of Germany. A gradual process of economic interdependence from the early stages of the Industrial Revolution saw the Germanic states move towards economic unification, before they engaged in political unification. This economic growth became increasingly reliant upon the strong bonds throughout the Germanic states. This illustrated an emerging identity of a strong Germany separate form Austria. Schleswig and Holstein are two German duchies (remains of old

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    The Perfect Ruler in the Epic Poem, Beowulf

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    The classic poem Beowulf presents the concept of the perfect king/leader/ruler. This is presented in two modes: the ideal Germanic king and the ideal Christian king. Literary scholar Levin L. Schucking in “Ideal of Kingship” states: “I have already tried to prove that the author of Beowulf designed it as a kind of Furstenspiegel (“mirror of a prince”) – perhaps for the young son of a prince, a thought with which Heusler later agreed” (36). So the author of Beowulf had in mind a human ideal of

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    Nazism

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    Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945 (the "Third Reich"), and it is derived from the term National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus, often abbreviated NS). Adherents of Nazism held that the Aryan race were superior to other races, and they promoted Germanic racial supremacy and a strong, centrally governed state. Nazism has been outlawed in modern Germany, yet small remnants and revivalists, known as "Neo-Nazis", continue to operate in Germany and abroad. Originally, Nazi was invented by analogy to

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    Women in Anglo-Saxon England

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    Women in Anglo-Saxon England Anglo-Saxon literature was based on Germanic myths about battles, heroes, diseases, dragons and religion. Writers did not pay much attention to female issues, and there are only few poems that talk about them. Beowulf and “"The Wife’s Lament"” are two examples that briefly consider women’s lives in that time. Anglo-Saxon history and poetry portray women’s lives as uneasy and dependent on their husbands’ positions. Women had to endure arranged marriages, abuse and

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    Gothic Culture

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    objective of my writings. First lets take a look at what Goth is and where it began. Gage Canadian Dictionary defines "Goth." as "an uncivilized person, barbarian."( 1975:425) the origin of the word dates back to the third or fourth centuries when a Germanic tribe called the VisiGoths overran the Roman Empire and settled in what is now Sweden and the surrounding area (Shultz,1984:325). The word gained its modern meaning during the Italian Renaissance when the word was used to describe the architecture

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