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    Great Awakening

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    The Great Awakening was when religion was sweeping throughout New England with more conversions and church membership. This spiritual awakening took place from 1735 up until 1745. (Brief Outline Notes on the Great Awakening, 1735-45 ) Most of this had taken place within the American Colonies, especially New England.(McCormick, pars. 9) . The Great Awakening had many causes, however the consequences benefitted many. Many people were moving farther and farther away from religion, the Great Awakening

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    people; Jonathan Edwards, a congregational pastor in Massachusetts, Theodore J. Frelinghuysen, a Dutch Byterian Pastor in New Jersey; Gilbert Tennent, a Presbyterian Pastor in New Jersey; and George Whitefield, a traveling Methodist Preacher from New England. The most widely known leader was George Whitefield. At the beginning of the very first Great Awakening appeared mostly among Presbyterians in Pennsylvania and in New Jersey. The Presbyterians initiated religious revivals during these times. During

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    Tennent, and George Whitefield left the largest marks. Edwards in Northampton, England brought the Great Awakening to New England where Whitefield was touring. From the years 1739-1741 Whitefield travelled, east, west, north and south preaching from Georgia to New England cities. Whitefield was a member of the Calvinistic Methodist Church and his journal is a key first-hand account of his travels. Whitefield spoke from balconies and rooftops assembling hundreds of individuals. Whitefield writes,

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    The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity that came from their belief of the life and teachings of John Wesley. George Whitefield and John's brother Charles Wesley were also leaders of this movement. It started as a revival in the Church of England in the 18th century then it turned into a separate Church after Wesley's death. Because of missionary activity, the movement spread throughout the British Empire, the United States, and several other places. Today it

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    THE FIRST GREAT AWAKENING The First Great Awakening was an extremely important religious revival that moved through the American colonies. This spiritual revival took place in the American colonies around 1730 to 1760. The First Great Awakening was able to gain a lot of momentum because of the influential preaching that taught the citizens of these colonies that the only way to salvation was by accepting Jesus Christ as their Savior. Many of the colonists believed that they lived proper and

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    revivals which historians have termed the Great Awakening. The Great Awakening was a movement that set out to revive the piety of the faithful and to convert nonbelievers. (American Promise, p.131). Influential people like Jonathan Edwards and George Whitefield preached powerful sermons to win the hearts of the nonbelievers and refresh the believers that were losing their faith. “Whitefield’s preaching transported many in his audience to emotion-choked states of religious ecstasy.”(American Promise

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    ‘Wesley and the People Called Methodists’, by Richard P. Heitzenrater takes an intense and lengthy look at John Wesley and the start of the Methodist movement. The book, with the exception of the English reformation for context, covers the time from Wesley’s birth till his death; however Heitzenrater does not share a lot of intimate details of Wesley’s personal life. The book shares the beginnings of Methodism without assuming any former knowledge that the reader may have about the foundations of

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    Great Awakening

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    By the beginning of the 18th century, there was an unmistakable feeling in the American Colonies that its intemperate society had become too comfortable and assertive, and had forgotten its original intentions of religious prosperity. The result was a revitalization of religious piety that swept through the American colonies between the 1730s and the 1770s, a movement known as "The Great Awakening". This revival was part of an evangelical upsurge occurring simultaneously in England, Scotland, Germany

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    I have been a firm believer that if one does not understand where you come from you can have little understanding of where your heading. The first thirty-two pages of the book on “Methodism and the Christian Heritage in England” gave a background as to Wesley’s foundation that so many authors overlook. The first page summed it up best in: “The long course of English ecclesiastical history met the force of a new concern for renewal, both individual and institutional. A long tradition of propositional

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    colonies known as the Great Awakening. These passionate and dramatic revivals performed by James Whitefield and others led to religious dissension. Many ministers disagreed with the message, approach, and influence being spread by Whitefield and his New Light clergy members. Old Light ministers believed they were providing the lower class and minority groups the ability to critique the religious elite. In George Whitefield's, Marks of a True Conversion is an example of one of his powerful and intense

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