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    Chaucer's The General Prologue Chaucer-the pilgrim starts out “The General Prologue” with detailed descriptions of each pilgrim as he views them. When Chaucer-the pilgrim arrives at the Pardoner, he becomes very focused on his physical appearance and what is seems to be missing. There is something odd about this Pardoner and Chaucer-the pilgrim can’t seem to grasp just what that is. He describes that the Pardoner is all on fire to do is job, just arriving from Rome (Bretful of pardon, come from

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    General Prologue

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    General Prologue When the seasons are filled with fresh, milk-white snow to pack happy snowmen together, and lively decorations to usher the New Year in and keep the evil spirits away; when also the frenzied salary-men are able to relax from jobs and pursue pet hobbies, it is joyous winter. In the spirit of celebration, pilgrims from the world over who are part owners in Chang Securities have come to the San Francisco company headquarters for the anniversary of incorporation. And so by chance

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    Regardless of era, travel has always been a key theme, or plot driver, throughout much of the world’s literature. Geoffrey Chaucer’s General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales is no exception. In the General Prologue, Chaucer uses the travelling history of some of the key pilgrims on the pilgrimage to characterize the pilgrims and help the audience understand more about the character, simply through grasping their experiences in different places throughout their lives. The noble Knight, whose crusades

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    The General Prologue - The Canterbury Tales The General Prologue The most popular part of the Canterbury Tales is the General Prologue, which has long been admired for the lively, individualized portraits it offers. More recent criticism has reacted against this approach, claiming that the portraits are indicative of social types, part of a tradition of social satire, "estates satire", and insisting that they should not be read as individualized character portraits like those in a novel

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    The Function of The Narrator In The General Prologue In General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales the character of Chaucer as the narrator serves as our guide to the action. Chaucer narrates as if he is in the moment himself, just meeting these pilgrims for the first time, and he makes the audience as though they are right there with him. At other times, though, Chaucer is a narrator who seems to know more than he ought to. For example, he tells us that, when the Shipman wins a fight, he murders the

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    The Wife of Bath, The Wife of Bath Prologue, and The General Prologue These selections from The Canterbury Tales best exemplify the ideals and traits of women (as portrayed by Chaucer). In, The Wife of Bath Prologue, the narrator brags of her sexual exploits as well as her prowess of controlling men. The narrator is quite forthright in her enjoyment of this manipulation; she comments on her technique of lying and predomination of men. The General Prologue further serves to display the daunting

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    In “The General Prologue”, Chaucer's portrait of the pilgrim Friar satirizes the estates through his seduction of women, his misuse of begging, and his disassociation with the class he should be living among. The ironic descriptions and estates satire of the Friar portray how corrupt the Catholic Church was at this time. The pilgrim Friar is in the class of the clergy, but acts as if he is of a higher class. He does not act as how a Friar should be; he is not who he should be. Any other friar is

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    a device which the author uses to display an apparently indifferent account of the pilgrims. While he offers mostly positive feedback, the sarcasm of Chaucer himself is apparent, despite the mask he uses. So Chaucer's model characters in the General Prologue are not presented to us merely within this context, but rather they are shown to us more interestingly; in the progression of Chaucer's unravelling of their moral facades and noble status. Chaucer is intentional in his positioning of the Knight;

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    Yongzheng Qi Professor Benjamin J Philippi English 201 16 September 2015 Irony in the General Prologue In The General Prologue, Chaucer’s narrator depicts a number of pilgrimages who represent different estates: the chivalrous and righteous Knight, the fashionable young Squire in the military estate; the graceful and merciful Prioresse, the rich Monk who breaks down the tradition, the slick Friar in the clergy estate; the indebted Merchant, the knowledgeable Clerk in the professional estate. That

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    ​If one has ever read the General Prologue of Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, they will find the attitude of Chaucer to be very opinionated and complex toward the members of the clergy. Some of the clergy consists of the Monk, the Prioress (also known as the nun), and the Friar. Chaucer has gone into depth of each one of these members in each section of the Prologue. From reading each section and analyzes his attitude towards each member, it is portrayed that Chaucer has a complex attitude

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