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    Galen

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    Galen Galen was one of the greatest doctors of the ancient world. Galen performed dissections on monkeys, pigs, and other animals, and established comparative anatomy as a field of anatomy. Galen was born in Pergamum (Present day Turkey), a city of the Roman Empire. He began to study medicine at the age of 14. He firstly began at Rome but later went to the great city of Alexandria. At about A.D. 157, Galen became a physician for trained fighters called gladiators. This was an indirect

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    Claudius Galen of Pergamum

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    Claudius Galen of Pergamum Claudius Galen was a second century physiologist, philosopher, and writer who is often considered the most important contributor to medicine following Hippocrates. Even though Galen is fairly well known, his fame does not compare to that of Hippocrates, so Galen's reputation and work are often underscored by Hippocrates' notoriety. While Galen's name is mentioned in most sources about ancient medicine, usually only a small portion of the piece is dedicated to his

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    Claudius Galenus, better known as Galen, hailed from an old Greek city by the name of Pergamum. Pergamum was a Greek center for learning and medicine where he, born into wealth, had ample time to study. After his father died he went to study in Smyrna (located in present day Izmir, Turkey) and then Alexandria to finish his medical studies. His first position as a physician was in service to gladiators in Pergamum, where he honed his skills in anatomy and surgery. When he traveled to Rome, news

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    world is important. On the topic of free will and moral responsibility, Strawson argues for the pessimist viewpoint while Susan argues for the compatibilist viewpoint. A clear formulation of the problem that Strawson and Wolf are discussing STRAWSON Galen Strawson is not easily a hard determinist. His position is that free will and ultimate moral responsibility is certainly impossible weather determinism is true or false. Strawson does not state that free will is impossible because determinism is true

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    Hippocrates And Galen

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    Hippocrates And Galen Hippocrates (460? - 370? B.C.) is acknowledged as the father of modern medicine. He was born on the island of Kos, and taught medicine there before dying in Larissa. He is known as the founder of holistic medicine, because he was the first to attribute illness to be one of the four elements - fire, water, earth, and air - rather than an affliction given by the gods. However, locals believed Hippocrates was a descendant of Asklepios, god of medicine. Hippocrates himself

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    Roman and Greek Medical Ideas There was a great deal of continuity between the medical ideas of the Greeks and Romans, but there was also some change. Although the Greeks were the first to suggest that the Gods did not cause and cure illness, there were still some believers in 'faith healing'. This was the same in the Roman times. A prime example of this belief is when the plague hit Rome in 295 BC. The people were beginning to get desperate, after they had tried many herbal cures, so they

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    ‘The Development of Anatomy and Physiology in the Renaissance’: “All’s bones that is bones” Did you know that during the European Dark Ages and some of The Enlightenment, surgeons and regular townsfolk would perform bloodletting, a practice that involved cutting oneself to drop blood levels and ‘cleanse’ the body of illness and psychological disorder? It was introduced and developed by several ancient Greek scientists, who thought that similar to menstrual cycles cleansing a body, releasing blood

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    and examine the human brain. During a time when many people and physicians followed Galen's teachings blindly Vesalius made a great change in the medicine world. He went against many beliefs and looked towards facts. He, on many occasions, corrected Galen even though he knew this would anger many people. He spent a large portion of his life dissecting human bodies of both men and women. He recorded in detail all his findings for future generations to study and learn. He taught his students that doing

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    Shakespeare, self proclaimed poet and renowned playwright, lived in the age of the Renaissance. More specifically, the time at which the Tudor family ruled England, during these times, there were deep-rooted religious cleansings and ongoing witch hunts, that sought out anyone and everyone that did not follow suit. Shakespeare (1564-1616A.D.) was born in, and lived through the medical renaissance, which was the point between 1400 and 1700A.D. that innovated the medicines used in Europe. These treatments

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    Around 6th through the 2nd century many physicians would perform experiments on animals, just to satisfy their curiosity. They would study their anatomy to understand the differences between animals and humans. Galen of Pergamum (129-216 CE) was one of the first to ever dissected and vivisected animals for his testing. Vivisection is when resesrcher operate on living animals to study the animals body when it is a life.  He would dissect sheeps, pigs, goats, and monkeys to better his surgical skills

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    History Of Ancient Rome

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    of Rome. Luke all the great stories that end in ruin and defeat, the story of the fall of the Roman civilization is sad, perhaps because it is a reminder of the inevitable end of all things (Prioreschi). References Claudii Galeni Pergameni. Galen on Anatomical Procedures. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine, 1956. "Medicine in Ancient Rome." Medicine in Ancient Rome. 2014. Accessed November 12, 2014. Nordqvistv, Christian. "What Is Ancient Roman Medicine?" Medical News Today. August

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    The study and development of Anatomy and Physiology dates back to ancient Greece, through the Middle Ages, and into our 21st century. However, many scientists believe that Anatomy and Physiology traces back to the early Stone Age. Cave paintings from the Stone Age depict an understanding and knowledge of the anatomy of animals. Scientists assume that the cave dwellers applied that knowledge to their own bodies. Ancient Egyptians also had a vast knowledge of the human body due to the mummification

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    Defying Your Elders

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    and its importance. Beginning in ancient Alexandria the urge for more updated knowledge was sought out for. Herophilus and Erasistratus began the use of dissection to diverge from humoral thinking and provide new knowledge by any means necessary. Galen began to combine humoral and anatomical thinking while dissecting animals, which led to many wrong assumptions. Finally, and possibly most importantly Andreas Vesalius used dissection to publicize his way of approaching the body. With his hands-on

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    my essay

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    The first way that Paracelsian medicine changed the selling of medicine was because it was an alternative to the longstanding theories of Galen, which caused tension to grow between followers of Paracelsus and those who followed the more traditional Galenic teachings. This animosity isn’t surprising because Galen had been used as the medical source for fifteen hundred years; suddenly having to deal with a competing theory would be a difficult adjustment for many to make. Yes, there had been issues

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    Human anatomy and physiology and the understanding of it has come a long way. Our bodies has many different parts to it. Due to advances’ in medicine and technology we have a more scientific understanding of what our bodies are made of and the functions/ roles our body parts have and also the effects of medicine on our bodies. Most of us has a basic understanding of what our body is made up of including cells, organs, tissues, and other systems . There are also other “common” knowledge’s and facts

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    How much did medicine and treatment progress (change and continuity) between 1350 and 1750? In medicine there were many things that changed and some that stayed the same between 1350 and 1750. Initially I will be looking at medicine and treatment in the Ancient World as a prelude to its importance during the Renaissance period, and also the influence it may have had in the Middle Ages. During Ancient times, cure and prevention of illness and disease were not very well developed – people would

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    Ancient Greek Medicine

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    from the brain and not from the heart, and he saw that the body needed to be treated as a whole and not just a series of parts. The theory of the four humours originated from the works of Aristotle. The idea of Humours is usually credited to Claudius Galen, a Greek physician of the second century A.D. But although he organized the idea more accessibly, he was probably not its creator. Centuries earlier, in the fourth century B.C., Hippocrates wrote of the bodily humours in his Hippocratic Corpus. The

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    Animal Testing Essay

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    efficacy of products for human use. Humans should continue animal testing because animal testing is the only choice of truly understanding human nature and keeping people alive. Animal testing first began in the 2nd century, AD. A roman physician, Galen, endlessly tested animals to advance human science. Later, an Arab physician, Ibn Zuhr tested surgical procedures on animals to understand how to safely practice on humans. Later on, Andreas Vesalius would teach his students about organs by publicly

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    The theories of Hippocrates and Galen are of vital importance to the development of medicine, as they shaped medicine for many centuries to come. Hippocrates was the first to dismiss the notion that magic, spirits, or the Gods could cause or cure disease, reforming the course medicine took. Galen followed in the footsteps of Hippocrates, working relentlessly on human anatomy, endeavoring to fathom how the body functions and what happens when something goes wrong. Without Hippocrates’ belief in diseases

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    discoveries, surgery techniques, and common diseases and treatments. Medical knowledge was scarce, but what little they had was contributed by these physicians and their curious minds. The ancient greek physician, Galen, concluded that all illnesses are caused by inner unbalance. Galen deduced that there are 4 bodily fluids

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