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    The Oedipus Complex in Galatea 2.2 Helen is in love with Powers; Powers is in love with C.; C. only wants to forget about Powers. This may sound like a soap opera, but in fact it is the love triangle present in Galatea 2.2. This love triangle mirrors Freud's Oedipal Complex almost perfectly. According to this theory, Richard Powers is Helen's mother. Like a mother he created her and then taught her how to think for herself. Also in this role reversal of the Oedipal Complex, Helen assumes the role

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    A Feminist Reading of Galatea 2.2 There is one common thread linking all novels written by males; their female characters are always depicted as the stereotypical female: weak, indecisive and emotionally unstable. The feminist approach to analyzing literature provides an explanation for this phenomenon. In this patriarchal society, women are viewed as the weaker sex, inferior. This can be the result of socialization or some negative interactions with women in the past. Richard Powers employs this

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    Formal Analysis of Galatea 2.2 The novel became important in 19th century as the middle-class became more educated and desired entertainment. With the coming of 20th century and its sophisticated technologies, the form of the novel expanded to include science fiction: a genre that combines mankind's awe of new technology and the age-old attribute of fantasy. Writers of science fiction found it necessary to employ the traditional style of the novel in their modern works. This is one of the main

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    The Galatea Theory

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    also lack the time for interaction, given that many fathers and mothers in non-English-speaking communities are working multiple jobs solely to survive (Tillman, 2009). Warm demanding theory, which rests on the empirical detection of the so-called Galatea Effect (Rosenthal & Jacobson, 1968), is that students improve to the extent that their mentors—whether teachers or parents—combine love with expectation. The warm-demanded—whom Ladson-Billings (1994) called the dream-keeper—is a figure who must balance

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    Pros and Cons of Long Distance Relationships

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    When I entered into my long distance relationship I was nervous, I had heard about how long distance relationships are unlikely to work in the long term. The first thing I did, living in the era of the internet, was to perform a Google search to see what exactly I could find to quell my nerves. It is evident from all the resources available—from the search “long distance relationship information” over 7.3 million results were found—that many others face similar fears. If we search for those people

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    Pygmalion’s disgust for women inspired him to create Galatea, a statue of unparalleled beauty. No one was like her, and soon Pygmalion himself became enchanted with his creation. With each stroke of his hammer and chisel, his affection grew. Despite her inanimateness, Pygmalion fell for the perfection of Galatea. Draping her with the finest of clothing, as well as adorning her with the loveliest of jewels, Pygmalion would continuously furnish Galatea with gifts ranging from seashells to flowers. Blinded

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    In the short story “Galatea,” Margaret Mary Bell meets William Bell when she’s at a playground with her sister. Margaret and William end up getting together and getting married pretty quickly. Suddenly one by one Margaret’s belongings disappear and she doesn’t understand why William is doing this. William ends up leaving Margaret and leaves her with nothing and no reasons why he took the stuff or himself away from her. She ends up finding out that William is the Collegetown Creeper. Margaret definitely

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    In a way like a powerful woman she makes her mind to support Freddy life long. Finally the poem takes so many references from Bible and it revolves around the events in Bible. On the other hand the play is based on a Greek Myth of Pygmalion and Galatea. But unlike the Myth here the heroine of the play rejects her trainer – creator – sculptor , Prof. Henry Higgins and leads her own destiny. In the poem – ‘Journey of the Magi’ the transformation is well decided and not induced but in the play – ‘Pygmalion’

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    Jealousy and Desire in Ovid's Metamorphoses Passionate lust is a blinding force. When jealousy and desire control actions, the outcome is never what it is envisioned to be. Ovid's Metamorphoses provides an clear example of love turned terribly wrong. Throughout the novel, overwhelming desire controls actions and emotions, leaving behind sadness and grief wherever it strikes. With this kind of love, nobody gets what he or she wants in the end. The first strong example of unsatisfactory

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    Ovid's Metamorphoses

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    Change is inevitable in life, whether it’s for good or bad. Ovid makes us reflect about something as basic as change, which can alter dramatically our lives, as we know them. According to Lively’s context for Ovid, Ovid in each of his literary career effectively transformed the world of elegy, playfully modeling each and every character along with its personality. He began a new approach of work in which he would change characters into new shapes, a feature of his approach to poetry that would reappear

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    Tracing Changes in Pythagoras' Speech in Ovid's Metamorphoses Change in Ovid, as well as in life, seems to be the only constant.   Change is the subject of the Metamorphoses and Ovid's purpose in recounting myths is established from the very beginning: "My intention is to tell of bodies changed to different forms... with a poem that runs from the world's beginning to our own days" (1.1-4).  From this foundation, Ovid launches into his stories, using metamorphosis more as a vehicle for telling

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    Ovid's story of Erysichthon is told in the epic Metamorphoses at lines 738-878 in book 8. Erysichthon was a man who is guilty of a sacrilege involving the sacred grove of the goddess Ceres. The goddess punishes him by casting the dreadful Famine upon him, where she would hide and consume Erysichthon with a voracious hunger. This punishment for cutting down the sacred oak of Ceres is severe indeed, bringing misfortune not only to him, but upon his whole country. He even resorts to selling his own

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    Ovid essay

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    The Metamorphoses (Latin: Book of Transformations) is a Latin narrative poem written by the Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso. The Metamorphoses compromises of 15 books and is considered by many historians to be Ovid's magnum opus. The Metamorphoses is a mythical-historical work which chronicles the history of the world from its creation to the deification of Julius Caesar. The Metamorphoses is not only a historical document but also a political document as well. Throughout his work, Ovid criticizes

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    Apollo's Human Gardening in Ovid's Metamorphoses In Ovid's epic poem Metamorphoses, he uses many transformations of humanoids to explain the existence of many natural entities such as animals, plants, rivers, and so forth. Ovid uses the Roman gods to be the active agents in many of the metamorphoses, although some of them are caused simply by the will of the being. In the Melville translation of Metamorphoses, the stories "The Sun in Love" (book IV, ln226-284) and "Hyacinth" (book X, ln170-239)

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    Ovid's Metamorphoses

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    Prima ab origine mundi, ad mea perpetuum… tempora carmen, “from the very beginning of the world, in an unbroken poem, to my own time” (Metamorphoses 1.3-4). Publius Ovidius Naso also known as Ovid wrote Metamorphoses, which combines hundreds of stories from Greek mythology and Roman traditions. He stitched many of them together in a very peculiar epic poem in fifteen books. The central theme of the book is transformation “from the earliest beginnings of the world, down to my own times.” Ovid sweeps

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    The Greek Creation Epic, The Metamorphoses by Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid), describes the formation of the Earth and mankind in ex nihilo, the Latin phrase defined as “out of nothing”. Ovid’s Metamorphoses tells a story of Earth’s creations as a god transforms a natural object Chaos into Earth and then populating it with humans and animals. This famous Greek mythical creation story has its similarities and differences with other creation stories we’ve studied such as Enuma Elish, Gensis 1 & 2, Hesiod’s

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    a wife like the girl he has carved from ivory. Luckily for him, Venus knows his heart’s desire and she brings the statue to life. Pygmalion and his wife marry and live happily ever after. Though the girl is never named by Ovid, later on the name Galatea is attributed to her. There are certain aspects of the Pygmalion myth that are rather sickening when taking into account the message behind the myth. The entire basis of the Pygmalion plot stems from a character making another - literally, such as

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    Pygmalion Research Paper

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    for so long and so hard that you would come alive.” He redirected his attention to the heavens and cried, “Thank you Aphrodite! Thank you.” Galatea knelt down next to her love on the cold stone floor, with her hands still in his they praised and thanked Aphrodite together for her sweet gift of life. Pygmalion, gazing into Galatea’s eyes, said, “Sweet Galatea, I have waited for far too long. Please say you’ll be my wife. You are the only women I could ever fathom spending eternity

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    Pygmalion Research Paper

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    pay for them te-ooo: make no mistake”. She maintains her personal character throughout the book, through witty remarks and regaining her independence. Galatea differs from Eliza because she is purely a product of Pygmalion. Galatea was not a woman before he made her, she looks the way he wants her to look and is the woman he wants her to be. Galatea did not have the same opportunity as Eliza to became her own person and build her own personality. She is happy to be with Pygmalion no matter the circumstance

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    from the tale Calvin has written and why. In the classic tale it is Aphrodite who brings Galatea to life, yet in the modern portrayal there is no explanation, leaving the viewer with questions. It could be that the typewriter that Calvin had used was magical, or that a spirit like Aphrodite had helped him out, however it was never answered in the movie. There are also very discrete changes, like the form Galatea held before becoming human, and there are bigger changes like the introduction of a love

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