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    Gaelic League

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    Gaelic League What are the Irish known for? Most people would automatically think of some trivial fact about something like the potato famine, others the stereotypical views of the Irish drinking habits, and undoubtedly good old Irish American pubs would definitely come to mind. Although these are definitely interesting parts of the Irish history there are many other aspects to this unique heritage that truly capture the spirit of the Irish tradition. The Gaelic League was started with the

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    The Gaelic League

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    The Gaelic League After the famine and the institution of Home Rule on Ireland as part of the United Kingdom, the partially broken country, Ireland, became in need of nationalism in its land, along with something that would set the Irish apart from England. Answering the call for leadership in a country with a desperate need for it, Douglas Hyde and Eoin MacNeill stepped up. In 1893, the two joined to form the Gaelic League. The effects of this organization change the success of Ireland as

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    The Call for the Gaelic League

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    The Call for the Gaelic League What would the United States be like if Americans couldn’t practice their customs, culture, or even appreciate their heritage? Granted the United States is a “melting pot” for several ethnicities, but some native countries and cultures have faced this type of dilemma. The Spanish influence on the Aztecs and the English on Native Americans are two examples of this imperialistic move. If only these cultures had a strong network of men and women who devoted their lives

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    The Preservation of a Culture: The Gaelic League Imagine what if much of today’s freedoms that we take for granted were never even there to begin with? In Ireland this is what most of the people were realizing when the Government was starting to take control. The Government was getting irritated and wanted to get rid of all Ireland’s language and culture. During the 1800’s Ireland was a thriving culture with much going on. Ireland had many things coming to an end and also starting a new beginning

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    EFFECTS OF THE GAELIC LEAGUE

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    EFFECTS OF THE GAELIC LEAGUE There has been discussion and problems in Ireland over the Irish language, culture, and Ireland’s economic development. Language and culture are among the most important elements of Irish heritage. One contribution that helped solve some of those problems was The Gaelic League. The Gaelic League had many effects in Ireland including reviving the Irish language, improving schools, making the social life of Ireland better and having less discrimination among other countries

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    Cause for Action

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    the long political conflicts. This very incident occurred at the end of the 19th century. It happened in Ireland to the Gaelic culture, but a man by the name of Douglas Hyde wasn’t about to let his culture disappear. Thus the Gaelic League was created. Many problems had to pave the way for this unique and distinctive league to form in 1893. It took a previous group, the Gaelic Athletic Association, to motivate the strong opposition of eliminating the Irish heritage. Also the Home Rule Act, set

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    Revival of the Irish Culture

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    national heritage perhaps unlike any other culture today. Many Irish homes are decorated with clovers, flags, and other Gaelic symbols even today. This enthusiasm for Irish culture has not always been around. In fact, this source of pride can be traced back to one cultural revival movement in Ireland during the 1800’s. During this time, the people of Ireland formed the Gaelic League to unify their country, and to give themselves a national identity of where they came from. Due to the persecution

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    Michael Collins

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    never absorbed into London's society itself. There were many people in London who felt that the Irish undercut the wages paid out to other workers and many in the Irish community felt ostracised. While in London, Collins joined Sinn Fein and the Gaelic League and in 1909, he became a member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood. In 1916, Collins returned to Ireland to take part in the Uprising in Dublin. He fought alongside others in the General Post Office. He played a relatively minor part and was not

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    in Ireland in 1833. During this time, the area was undergoing colonisation by the English and the play represents a microcosm of the events occurring all over the nation at the time. The consequence of this colonisation was inevitably that the Gaelic language native to Ireland was eventually lost and replaced by English. Friel develops a pre-disposed bias towards the colonised through the characterisation of both Hugh and Lancey and this creates an allegiance between the audience and the

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    The Gaelic Athletic Association After the Great Potato Famine in the country of Ireland, the culture and pride of the land began to disappear. The Irish had lost around one million people after this tragedy struck the land, and the Irish morale was low. People began to emigrate to other countries and British customs and language were beginning to take over. It became evident that the Irish needed a cultural revolution to restore all that had been lost in their culture. The solution to this problem

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