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    Futility

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    While mining over abundant quotes, sonnets in a seemingly different language, and soliloquies with enough meter and meaning to write a doctorate, the main thing I’m left wondering is: What exactly was Shakespeare’s intent in writing Hamlet? He too, like the readers of today, was a mortal being. He too felt feelings of revenge and purposelessness, and questioned being and capability. As any other human has strived to comprehend at some point in their humble lives, I believe that this is one of Shakespeare’s

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    Futility of Life in The Death of Ivan Ilyich

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    Futility of Life in The Death of Ivan Ilyich Count Leo Tolstoy is considered Russia’s greatest novelist and one of its most influential moral philosophers. As such, he is also one of the most complex individuals for historians of literature to deal with. His early work sought to replace romanticized glory with realistic views. A good example of this is the way he often portrayed battle as an unglamorous act performed by ordinary men. After his marriage, though, Tolstoy started to reexamine his

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    The Futility of Dreams in Of Mice and Men Everyone has a dream they hope to achieve, but dreams are not always possible to attain. In John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, two ranch hands, George and Lennie, find work in Salinas Valley. Lennie, constantly getting into trouble, inadvertently causes the two of them to be run out of town and thus have to find new work regularly. George and Lennie's search for work in the hope of accomplishing their dream of a small farm of their own displays

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    the American Dream. The novel is Fitzgerald's vessel of commentary and criticism of the American Dream. “Fitzgerald defines this Dream, he depicts its’ beauty and irresistible lure”(Bewley 113). Through Gatsby's downfall, Fitzgerald expresses the futility and agony of the pursuit of the dream. The aspects of the American Dream are evident throughout Fitzgerald's narrative. Take, for example, James Gatz's heavenly, almost unbelievable rise from "beating his way along the south shore of Lake Superior

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    Hopelessness, Futility and Escape in The Glass Menagerie The Glass Menagerie is set in the cramped, dinghy apartment of the Wingfield family.  It is just one of many such apartments in this lower-class neighborhood. Not one of the Wingfield family members desires to live this apartment. Poverty is what traps them in their humble abode. The escape from this lifestyle, this apartment and these relationships is a significant theme throughout the play. These escapes may be related to the fire escape

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    Futility of Life Exposed in T.S. Eliot's The Hollow Men The 'Hollow Men', by T.S Eliot, is a reflection on the emptiness, futility and misery of modern life. It is also a reflection on the problems involved in human communication, and on the meaning (or lack of it) to life. Eliot uses religious and desert symbolism, biblical and literary allusions, repetition, parody and deliberately sparse, controlled language to convey the themes of the poem. The poem opens with two epigraphs - "MISTAH

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    The ideal of the ‘American Dream’ has hardly changed over the past century. The dream is a unique American phenomenon. It represents a nebulous concept that is exemplified by a number of American values. Many deem wealth and success to be the means to this paradigm. When stability, security and family values also become part of the suburban lifestyle, the American Dream comes close to becoming reality. Nick Carraway, the candid narrator of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby analyzes the

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    Critical Review of Carn

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    Eventually, Josie's destructive lifestyle and the political conflicts between England and Ireland result in tragedy for both characters. McCabe does an excellent job at developing the characters of Josie, Sadie, and the town of Carn itself. He shows the futility of their hopes, which ultimately results in tragedy and despair. The reader can relate to the characters, and by the conclusion of the novel, the reader will feel as if s/he knows the characters personally. Josie Keenan lives a life without hope

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    All Quiet on the Western Front One of the main themes in All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque is Futility of War. The novel takes place during the Great War and takes place in France. Paul Baumer is the main character in the book along with many of his friends. In the book the theme of futility of war appears in the beginning, middle and end of the novel and Baumer slowly becomes more aware of what war is really like. In the beginning Baumer enters the war as a recruit and begins

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    The Outsider in Don Quixote and Frankenstein

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    Regarding the seeds of creativity that produced her Frankenstein, Mary Shelley paraphrases Sancho Panza, explaining that “everything must have a beginning.” She and Percy Shelley had been reading Don Quixote, as well as German horror novels, during the “wet, ungenial summer” and “incessant rain” of their stay with Lord Byron at Villa Diodati in Geneva in 1816. In his introduction, Maurice Hindle notes the connection between the two fictional madmen: Both Don Quixote and Frankenstein start

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