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    The Sound and the Fury

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    The Sound and the Fury: Chronology of Despair Three little boys watch wearily and fearfully as their sister shimmies quickly up a tree to peer through the window of a dilapidated Southern farmhouse. Our attention focuses neither on her reaction to the festivities commencing in the house, nor on the danger suspended nervously in the dusky air as the tiny image worms up the tree trunk. Sensing the distress apparent in the boys’ words and actions, our eyes rivet to the same thing that fills their

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    Sound and The Fury

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    Sound and The Fury William Faulkner's The Sound and The Fury is a complicated story of  tragedy, lies, and destruction.  The whole Compson family is filled with negativity and bad decisions.  The family is broken down little by little until it is finally destroyed.  Ms. Compson is supposed to be in control but she is a  neurotic self-centered woman that escapes responsibility by depending on Dilsey for every need.  Ms Compson also created hostility between the Family. Jason, the head

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    An Innocent Archetype War brings out the worst in men; soldiers can only stay innocent for so long until they have to survive the new blood and gore clouded world they’re thrown into. Norman Ellison, portrayed by Logan Lerman in the war movie Fury, is a perfect example of crumbling innocence as he’s forced to kill to live another day. As a young innocent new recruit, who has only been in the war for eight weeks, and trained as a typist, Ellison can 't fathom the fact that he is actually on the

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    The Strength of Dilsey in The Sound and the Fury In The Sound and the Fury, the fated Compson family is a portrayal of both the declining old South and the new South that rose demonically out of its ruins. Through the Compsons, Faulkner personifies at once the mournful self-pity of a fallen gentry, and in Jason, the embittered rage and resentment of those who come after the fall. Throughout the novel, Dilsey is the one quiet fortitude in this irredeemably tragic and fallen family.

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    Structures Used in The Sound and the Fury

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    Structures Used in The Sound and the Fury In “Christian and Freudian Structures”, Carvel Collins points out some interesting systems used by Faulkner in The Sound and The Fury. Collins refers to the first system Faulkner uses as a Christian structure, which shows how all three Compson sons are in parallel with Christ. When discussing the Christian structure, Collins says that it is important for the reader to know that three of the four sections are set on Easter Sunday and the two days preceding

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    Societal Symbology in The Sound and the Fury A group of independent scientists and historians had determined that mankind was destined to self- destruct in twenty years, despite the best efforts of those who would change the world. Within days of the dire pronouncement, civilization had reverted to its component personality types - revealing the fundamental essence of every person who had heard the news. There were those unable to deal with the imminent doom of the human race, who went home

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    Shakespeare in the Sound and the Fury

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    Shakespeare in the Sound and the Fury The "Tomorrow" soliloquy in Act V, scene v of the Shakespearean tragedy Macbeth provides central theme and imagery for The Sound and the Fury.  Faulkner may or may not agree with this bleak, nihilistic characterization of life, but he does examine the characterization extensively. Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow Creeps in this petty pace from day to day To the last syllable of recorded time; And all our yesterdays have

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    William Faulkner's The Sound and The Fury

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    Heart's Darling: Faulkner and Womanhood In William Faulkner's The Sound and The Fury, Caddy Compson is the anchor character because Faulkner himself is so obsessed with her that he is unable bring her down off a platform enough to write words for her. Instead, he plays out his obsession by using her brothers as different parts of himself through which to play out his fantasies and interact with her. Faulkner writes himself into the novel by creating male characters all based on aspects of his own

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    The Cemetary and Loss in Faulkner’s The Sound and Fury On the sixth page of the novel The Sound and The Fury, Caroline Compson informs her son Jason that she and her other son Benjy are "going to the cemetery." The sense of loss that runs through much of Faulkner's work, especially The Sound and The Fury, can be found in the quiet, black-and-white world of the dead. In a cemetery one is reminded of lives lost and lost lives. Faulkner honors both in his novel. The story reveals a multilayered cacophony

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    The Sound and The Fury

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    The Sound and the Fury This novel revolves around the rise and the fall of the aristocratic 19th century Southern Compsons that advocated conventional Southern values. In that dynamism and the muting family norms, the rival upsurge was the changing role of men and women. This is true, as men used to enjoy their authority, dominance, power, masculinity, valiancy, virtuous strength, determination, and courtliness over women and in the society while the role played by the women was similar to putting

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    The Sound and the Fury

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    The Sound and the Fury Title: The title of this novel is The Sound and the Fury. This title is derived from one of Shakespeare’s most intriguing plays, Macbeth. Within Macbeth, Shakespeare describes life as “a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury.” And if life is “a tale told by an idiot,” there is justification as to of why Faulkner begins the book through the eyes of Benjy, a thirty-three year old retard. Author: The author of The Sound and the Fury is William Faulkner. He grew up in

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    The Sound and the Fury and The Crying of Lot 49 It is fitting to discuss the recollection of the past in an age advancing to an unknown futurity and whose memories are increasingly banished to the realm of the nostalgic or, even worse, obsolete. Thomas Pynchon and William Faulkner, in wildly contrasting ways, explore the means by which we, as individuals and communities, remember, recycle, and renovate the past. Retrospection is an inevitability in their works, for the past is inescapable

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    The Sound and The Fury

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    Sound and the Fury is a compelling novel written by William Faulkner. It was released in 1929, during an era called the Roaring 20s. This was a time during which literature reflected drastic changes in society, as well as the consumerism that emerged from the invention of the automobile. Faulkner, contrastingly, explores the themes of love and morality in this novel. But most importantly, its message of sorrow and moral decay are incomparable to any other novel. In The Sound and the Fury, through the

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    Bleikasten’s Literary Analysis of Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury By focusing on the figure of Caddy, Bleikasten’s essay works to understand the ambiguous nature of modern literature, Faulkner’s personal interest in Caddy, and the role she plays as a fictional character in relation to both her fictional brothers and her actual readers. To Bleikasten, Caddy seems to function on multiple levels: as a desired creation; as a fulfillment of what was lacking in Faulkner’s life; and/or as a thematic

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    The Sound And The Fury

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    THE SOUND AND THE FURY William Faulkner's background influenced him to write the unconventional novel The Sound and the Fury. One important influence on the story is that Faulkner grew up in the South. The Economist magazine states that the main source of his inspiration was the passionate history of the American South, centered for him in the town of Oxford, Mississippi, where he lived most of his life. Similarly, Faulkner turns Oxford and its environs, "my own little postage stamp of native soil

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    A Psychoanalytic Approach to Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury In Faulkner's work, The Sound and the Fury, Caddy is never given an interior monologue of her own; she is seen only through the gaze of her brothers, and even then only in retreat, standing in doorways, running, vanishing, forever elusive, forever just out of reach.  Caddy seems, then, to be simultaneously absent and present; with her, Faulkner evokes an absent presence, or the absent center of the novel, as André Bleikasten and

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    William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury

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    William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury In William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, the image of honeysuckle is used repeatedly to reflect Quentin’s preoccupation with Caddy’s sexuality. Throughout the Quentin section of Faulkner’s work, the image of honeysuckle arises in conjunction with the loss of Caddy’s virginity and Quentin’s anxiety over this loss. The particular construction of this image is unique and important to the work in that Quentin himself understands that the honeysuckle

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    Sartre and Brooks’ Literary Critiques: Analysis of Memory and Time in Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury “History is the witness that testifies to the passing of time.” Cicero presaged the study of historical memory and conceptions of time, which assumes that what and how we remember molds our past into something more than a chronological succession of events. Ever more appreciative of the subjectivity of recollection, we grasp that without memory, time passes away as little more than sterile

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    The author of The Sound and the Fury, William Faulkner is considered to be one of the greatest and most influential modernist writers of the twentieth century. The Sound and the Fury happens to be one of his most critiqued and studied pieces. Most essays written about the book focus on either the ideas that the mother is egotistical, cold, selfish or that the daughter retrogressive, impure, and soiled. Faulkner blames the decay of the family unit on the daughter Caddy’s virginity and the loss of

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    Quentin's Struggle in The Sound and the Fury

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    Quentin's Struggle in The Sound and the Fury Too much happens...Man performs, engenders so much more than he can or should have to bear. That's how he finds that he can bear anything.         William Faulkner (Fitzhenry  12) In Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, we are given a character known as Quentin, one who helps us more fully understand the words of the author when delivering his Nobel Prize acceptance speech "The young man or woman writing today has forgotten the problems

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