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    Opening a Window A Room with a View by E.D. Forster explores the struggle between the expectations of a conventional lady of the British upper class and pursuing the heart. Miss Lucy Honeychurch must choose between class concerns and personal desires. Honeychurch is a respectable young lady from a well-known family. She travels with Miss Charlotte Bartlett to Italy at the turn of the century. In Italy they meet Mr. Emerson and George Emerson. George is young man who falls in love with Lucy. Mr.

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    E. M. Forster

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    		Many aspects of writing catch a reader's attention and keep one interested in a book. E. M. Forster put many of these aspects in his books making them well written and quite interesting. He combined great characters, a decent story line, and his prolific knowledge of writing to make his books readable and enjoyable. 		E. M. Forster was born on January 1, 1879, in London, England. After an education at Tonbridge School and King's College, Cambridge, he spent a year traveling in Europe

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    Forster and Women

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    Passage to India, Forster expresses this male dominance by writing, “He took no notice of them, and with this, which would have passed without comment in feminist England, did harm in a community where the male is expected to be lively and helpful” (Forster 52). They say that to be female is to be passive, agreeable, timid, emotional, and conventional. The feminist theorists’ argument of a male centered society is definitely present in the novel A Passage to India. E.M. Forster reveals cultural

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    Howard's End by E. M. Forster Howards End by E. M. Forster deals with the conflict of class distinctions and human relationships. The quintessence of the main theme of this lovely novel is: "Only connect!…Only connect the prose and passion…and human love will be seen at its height. Live in fragments no longer." This excerpt represents the main idea that Forster carries through the book: relationships, not social status, are--or at least should be--the most important thing for people.Howards

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    William Edward Forster

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    Section A – Plan of Investigation I will analyze the question of “How did William Edward Forster contribute to the Education Act of 1870 in England?” How he contributed to the act and what changes he did within the act will show how the act became a new advantage in England for the middle-working class. A speech made by William Edward Forster about the Education Act and a memorandum of October 21, 1869 will be used to discuss his contribution and all the provisions made to the act. The book The

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    A Passage to India by Forster

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    Passage to India, Forster expresses this male dominance by writing, “He took no notice of them, and with this, which would have passed without comment in feminist England, did harm in a community where the male is expected to be lively and helpful” (Forster 52). They say that to be female is to be passive, agreeable, timid, emotional, and conventional. The feminist theorists’ argument of a male centered society is definitely present in the novel A Passage to India. E.M. Forster reveals cultural

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    Analysis of A Passage to India by Forster Forster's novel A Passage to India portrays a colonial India under British rule, before its liberation. For convenience's sake, Western civilization has created an Other as counterpart to itself, and a set of characteristics to go with it. An "us versus them" attitude is exemplified in Forster's representation of The Other. Separation of the British and the Indian exists along cultural lines, specifically religious/spiritual differences. Savage or ungodly

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    In the short thirty-nine years of the life of Harry Forster Chapin (1942-1981), he managed to distinguish himself as a creative genius in multiple fields, ultimately leaving a distinct mark on this world, though he received only moderate public recognition. Professionally, he was a musical performer and songwriter, a film editor, and a political activist and lobbyist, able to reach remarkable heights in all three fields. In the field of music, Chapin rose to stardom as a rock and roll performer and

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    A Passage to India by E. M. Forster

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    name, the characters a reader or viewer remembers are Aziz, Adela, Ronny, Mrs. Moore, and many more. There is one character within the story that fails to receive the credit that is due to her: India herself. Throughout the entire novel, E. M. Forster provides thoughts and words for India, though she cannot truly speak. David Lean also attempts to create a separate persona for India in his film. The two of them, in their unique ways, managed to create an extra character with its own personality

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    A Passage to India by E.M. Forster Upon a most rudimentary evaluation, A Passage to India is simply a story, a tale of two countries through which we follow a handful of central characters. As readers, we watch as these characters

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    A Passage to India by E.M. Forster In E.M. Forster's novel A Passage to India, characters often seem grouped into one of two opposing camps: Anglo-Indian or native Indian. All the traditional stereotypes apply, and the reader is hard pressed to separate the character from his or her racial and ethnic background. Without his "Britishness", for instance, Ronny disappears. However, a few characters are developed to the point that they transcend these categories, and must be viewed as people in their

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    Humankind in The Three Forster Short Stories Forster is writing in a time when society was changing dramatically. When rural life in the countryside was leaving while urban life was starting. While this is happening mechanically it was also happening in a mental aspect and the way people live and look at life is changing. What Forster sees is dangerous results. He was probably writing in a time like the Industrial revolution when a lot of lives were taken for the good of experimentation

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    Where Angels Fear to Tread, by E.M. Forster

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    “Fools rush in where angels fear to tread,” is a saying is commonly used to emphasize how ignorance can result in decisions that lead to unfavorable situations. Likewise, in Where Angels Fear to Tread, Edward Morgan Forster uses irony, point of view, and satire to effectively emphasize how stereotypes, prejudices, misunderstanding of cultural differences, and hypocrisy could lead to unfavorable circumstances. Where Angels Fear to Tread begins as a light and comedic novel but later develops to become

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    World Forster Creates in The Machine Stops In "The Machine Stops" Forster creates a world set in the future, where machines rule. In fact, machines run life so much so that human beings, by this time, have adapted accordingly to life and the lifestyle it brings. "In the arm-chair there sits a swaddled lump of flesh - a woman, about five feet high, with a face as white as a fungus," Forster writes. This is a pretty horrific description because it shows us that in the world Forster has created

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    varying degrees. In the story The Machine Stops (Forster, 1909), there is a contrast to the two main characters approach to technology. Vashti, impatient with her son, Kuno, at the slightest delay as indicated when he dawdled for 15 seconds, "Be quick!" She called, her irritation returning. "(Forster 1) Kuno finds it acceptable to dawdle. Kuno scolds his mother for dependence on The Machine, “The Machine is much, but it is not everything.” (Forster 1) This is similar to the approach that was discussed

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    I enjoyed the novel Rebecca thoroughly because of its many plot twists, suspense, universal themes and realistic characters. This novel ties closely with the novel Jane Eyre , in theme, plot and characters. My second novel A Room With A View has similar women characters and themes but has a very dissimilar plot line. All three of the novels are set in Italy in the early 1900’s. All three authors wrote love stories that included a strong willed man and an inferior woman. I found Daphne DuMaurier

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    Indians, and the Anglo-Indian relationship. Frederick P. W. McDowell confirms this sentiment when saying "Forster, in his description (of characters), is the witty satirist..." (100). Most of the English officials are presented satirically. Turton, Burton, McBryde, and Major Callendar are all victims of Forster's scornful eye. Even the wives of these men cannot escape the light mockery of Forster. For example, the Turtons are introduced as unquestionably arrogant, although Mrs. Turton is far more haughty

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    Charles Dickens’s David Copperfield

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    autobiographical. John Forster one of Charles Dickens close friends and the author of Dickens biography wrote, “too much had been assumed…of the full identity of Dickens with his hero; but certainly a good deal of Dickens’s character and experience went into the book”(Unknown 2). Forster’s remark deals mainly with some of the public’s belief that the entire story of David Copperfield was autobiographical. Charles Dickens began work on David Copperfield after John Forster questioned him about his

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    as its main theme: “It truly takes a human being to really see a human being.” Monster’s Ball had the potential to be a gripping tale of love lost and love found, but that potential is lost in a sea of subplots that drowns the main narrative. Forster is left with a film that is little more than a star vehicle for Berry’s and Thornton’s most compelling performances to date.

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    The Second Coming The Second Coming reminds me of the Marabar Caves in A Passage to India because of the "disconnectedness" that is portrayed.  The poem quickly begins: "Turning and turning in the widening gyre [cycle of history] The falcon cannot hear the falconer'; Here Yeats reminds us all about the cycle of life that is constantly in rebirth.  Everything is constantly "turning" in a "widening gyre" and yet the "falcon cannot hear the falconer"  Life is connected in the sense that it is constantly

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