Free Fitzgerald Essays and Papers

Sort By:
Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays

Free Fitzgerald Essays and Papers

Page 50 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    answered.  'I hate careless people.  That's why I like you.' " (Fitzgerald, pg. 63)  Jordan is explaining to Nick how she is able to drive badly as long as everyone else drives carefully.  This quote represents the writing technique of foreshadowing, which is being used in one of its finest form.  Fitzgerald is foreshadowing to chapter seven where Daisy kills Myrtle Wilson because of her reckless driving.  Fitzgerald uses foreshadowing to strengthen the plot of his book.  In chapter

    • 1167 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Date War and Peace Article summary I searched a lot to find an article that talks about the Iraq invasion of Kuwait. The article by Peter Fitzgerald “The Invasion of War” explores the reasons of the war between Kuwait and Iraq, considering that they were great allies in the past. He suggests that the differences between these two countries were economic and diplomatic. In the past the two were great allies and they greatly assisted each other during wars providing a protective edge in their territories

    • 728 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    book The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald recognizes and describes many of the less alluring characteristics of the 1920's and the pursuit of the American Dream including dysfunctional relationships, materialism and classism. The American dream states that people can work themselves up "from rags to riches" by hard work.1 For this reason, the new society has developed dreams of the blind pursuit of material, wealth, and economic success. F. Scott Fitzgerald realizes this big change in society

    • 2005 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    mysterious source of wealth, and he uses this mystery source to buy his house, his clothes, and Daisy. Gatsby's house, as Fitzgerald describes it, is "a factual imitation of some Hotel de Ville in Normandy, with a tower on one side, spanking new under a thin beard of raw ivy, and a marble swimming pool and more than forty acres of lawn and garden" (Fitzgerald 9). This house, as Fitzgerald fabulously enlightens to, is an immaculate symbol of Gatsby's incalculable income. "The house he feels he needs in order

    • 1775 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    In The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald criticizes American society in the 1920?s for its tendencies to waste, advertise, form superficial relationships, and obsess over appearances. The work has been praised for both its brutal realism and its keen depiction of the age that The New York Times referred to as the era when, 'gin was the national drink and sex was the national obsession'(Fitzgerald vii).  ' . . . indifference is presented as a moral failure - a failure of society, particularly the

    • 1738 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Trapped in a Dream in The Great Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, is a unique in that Fitzgerald does not describe the events in chronological order. Instead, a first-person narrator, Nick Carraway, presents the story as a series of flashbacks. The novel centers around its title character, Jay Gatsby, a rich West Egg citizen who is known for his exuberant parties. Before he left to fight in World War I, the Great Gatsby fell in love with Daisy Fay. He eagerly awaited his

    • 1792 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    bought and sold grain alcohol over the counter.” (Fitzgerald 134). This is the opposite idea of the American Dream, which states that only the good, virtuous and hard working are rewarded. Gatsby also lies his way through life to conceal his wrongdoing. Gatsby claims that he belongs to a rich family whom provides his way to Oxford and from whom he inherits his riches. “’I am the son of some wealthy people in the Middle West-all dead now.’” (Fitzgerald 65). Only later on in the novel, does Nick uncover

    • 842 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    winning the perfect girl is corrupt at its very core. Nick, though, also realizes that without the dream, life is barren and worthless. The characters in this short novel are all very interesting because of the distinctive and well-defined features Fitzgerald endows them. The main characters-Daisy, Gatsby, and Nick-each are especially articulate. Nick, the narrator and "arbiter", throughout most of the novel remains outside most of the action and reserves judgment until late in the novel when he reaches

    • 1194 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    of carelessness of money and material goods that are usually unobtainable by most. Prime examples of this carelessness are the huge parties that Gatsby throws; everybody who is anybody would attend: the party guests “[arrive] at twilight . . .” (Fitzgerald 111) and stay until daybreak, and “sometimes they [come] and [go] without having met Gatsby at all, [come] for the party with a simplicity of heart that [is] its own ticket of admission” (45). Gatsby puts enormous amounts of money into these parties

    • 1092 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

    • 1214 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited

    F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Portrayal of the Twenties F. Scott Fitzgerald was accurate in his portrayal of the aristocratic flamboyancy and indifference of the 1920s. In his novel, The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald explores many aspects of indifference and flamboyancy. A large influence on this society was the pursuit of the American Dream. Gangsters played a heavily influential role in the new money aristocracy of the 1920s. The indifference was mainly due to the advent of Prohibition in 1920. One major

    • 1214 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Better Essays